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  • A New Ryobi Tool

    OK SWMBO thinks I should ditch the self propelled walk behind Honda mower and get a riding mower. While checking out the available machines that would work on our 80x160 lot,I came acrossthe Ryobi RM480e rider. It's a 48 volt electric mower that can do 2 acres on a single charge. It's a bit expensive at 2,500 buckos, but it's getting very high ratings from a multitude of reviewers. As an eary adopter of Ryobi's BT3000, I recognize out of the box design and engineering, so. I'm wonderig if anyone has seen or used one?. The problem is that few HDs have them in stock. The nearest one ion a store floor is 45 miles away. They will deliver them to your door. but I'd like to touch/feel one before dropping 25K of my pension on it.
    Jim Frye
    The Nut in the Cellar.

  • #2
    Seems quite high in price.
    just another brick in the wall...

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    • #3
      Yeah, it's more than the 30" riders and some of the 42s, but an analysis that I read showed that it has a lower cost of maitenance and owersbip over 5 years or more. Most of the rear engineed riders consume about a gallon of gas per hour, and the RM480e would cost me about 10 - 15 cents to fully charge. Plus no oil, belts, filters, and related gas engine maintenance is necessary. The twin blades are driven by two electric motors, and the machine is driven by a third motor via a differential.
      Jim Frye
      The Nut in the Cellar.

      Comment


      • #4
        Mowers are a perfect example of getting what you pay for. Buy a cheap mower from the big box store and in a few years you will have to buy another one. Spend a few minutes researching mowers online and it will be revealed that most manufacturers sell numerous grades of nearly identical looking mowers. Suprisingly the nice looking green mower wonít hold a candle to a green mower that one of the many lawn service companies bought at the green tractor dealership. After going three Snapper Comet mowers, each with a retail price of somewhere near $850, I purchased a Honda HT3813 (2 cylinder, water cooled, shaft drive lawn lawn tractor), around $3200. This was in1988, now in 2018 I still own this mower and still occasionally use it. It still has the original tires, deck drive belts, and looks nearly as good as the day it was purchased. It is truely about worn out but I wonder how many $850 Snapper Comets I would have gone through during those 40 years?

        The Ryobi 480e may be as good as the BT3, and it may be a good residential mower. This could be a viable replacement for the junk residential gasoline riding mowers. I would question where you would get this machine serviced and get repair parts?
        Another fear would be that the money saved on fuel would be lost at the first battery replacement.

        capncarl
        Last edited by capncarl; 07-13-2018, 07:28 AM.

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        • #5
          For that money and that sized lot, I might be looking to see what a neighborhood kid would charge me using his tools and his gas.

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          • #6
            CapnCarl, I hear you. I used to buy the bottom of the line mower as a trim mower about every 5 - 7 years. They just don't last. I bought a Husqvarna 6 summers ago for about $300 and that thing runs better after 6 years than a new bottom of the line 3 hp Briggs and Straton 21" Walmart/HomeDepot special. When I bought the Husqvarna, I also bought one of those cheap mowers. The cheap one has died and I coaxed every minute I could out of that motor. (I usually keep two push mowers for trimming around flowers bed, trees and bushes and garden that are too close for my 42 inch to get through or around.)

            A second part to this is the "Owner". I know Jim will take care of his. It was interesting on the old Ryobi Forum to see the folks come on and then see their personalities evolve: In one, you could see a person who protected his tools; in the other you could see a person who did not take care of his tools and blame the tool (Ryobi BT3000) for his slamming a 2x4 or 4x4 down on the top and blaming the tool for its breaking - i.e. can't take the responsibility for not taking care or mis-use. Jim will take care of his. (I will admit that there WERE some quality control issues on occasion, as were pointed out often on even Uni-Saws.)

            I have an 18 year old Craftsman LT1000. I have had to replace parts on it over the years, but the motor runs smooth, belt drive is the same one. I have had to replace the solenoid twice, battery twice, blades twice and I need a new seat, replaced the fuel cap/gauge once. This is a middle of the pack mower at best.

            If I can do that, Jim Frye will make that new Ryobi Mower last for his lifetime and pass it on to whoever he sees that will take care of it in the future!
            Hank Lee

            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

            Comment


            • #7
              Well, gee thanks Hank! I also wondered about service and repair for this mower in the long run. A quick check for Ryobi Authorized Service Centers for outdoor equipment turned up one a mile and a half from me (a green/yellow dealer) and the one farther in town that I've used for decades. Guess I'm lucky.
              As for battery replacement, The ones used in the 75ah model list for about $50 dollars each (total of four) and the nearby Battery Wholesale shop sells them, if you don/t want to Amazon them. The cost of gas over 5 - 7 years easily pays for battery replacement. And like a Tesla, the batteries slide out on a tray for service. I also checked with a relative who builds/sells custom golf carts and he says one should get 5 to 7 years out of these batteries if you care for them properly. Battery care is stupid simple: don't run them down to dead and keep them on the charger when not in use. These are the same type of batteries that are used in golf carts, wheel chairs, and mobility scooters, so it's not bleeding edge tech.
              Last edited by Jim Frye; 07-13-2018, 09:07 AM.
              Jim Frye
              The Nut in the Cellar.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
                For that money and that sized lot, I might be looking to see what a neighborhood kid would charge me using his tools and his gas.
                Hard to get a neighborhood kid to do lawns these days. A great many of our neighbors use lawn services for lawn care. The streets are literately clogged every day with their trucks and trailers. I still like to do my own thing and the activity keeps me a bit more fit. My knees are a bit iffy these days and that's why SWMBO thinks I should have a rider. I'm loath to give up the 1 1/4 mile walk I get when I mow with the Honda walk behind. After all, I'm only 71.
                Jim Frye
                The Nut in the Cellar.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Jim, for less than the price of the Ryobi, you could get a Husqvana robot mower from Lowes and sit on the porch while your lawn mows itself. A friend of mine who lives in town has one and has had no issues with it in 4 years. Unfortunately, I'd need a fleet of 4 of the high end mowers and an army of other robots to pick up sticks, apples, and walnuts in my yard in order to use it.

                  Robot Mower
                  Chr's
                  __________
                  An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
                  A moral man does it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I didn't catch this yesterday, so a little late to the show with an opinion, but here goes:

                    First, I really like all my Ryobi tools, but in very recent years it seems that the introductions and departures seem to be an annual event, with what I thought were new models being replaced in just a year or two. That seems especially the case with outdoor products, but I perhaps I'm wrong about this, as I really don't attempt to keep up.B
                    That said, the question in my mind would be how long are you going to get parts, batteries, etc. from an expensive tool like this, when it may have been dropped or replaced in another two years or so? (I'm greatly disappointed in the fact that with a classic tool like by BT3100, and several TTI-made Ridgid tool purchases are now without parts.)

                    I do agree with those who state that it's hard to find someone to come and mow your lawn, especially if you want it done on a regularly scheduled basis. I have my house here in Binghamton (60 x 120), my house in Painted Post (60 x 110.. and a steep bank) and for three years my MIL's house over on the east side here (finally sold it last year), which was 50 x 100). I simply could not find a neighborhood teen who might want to do it, so I mowed the two houses here every week and the Painted Post house every other week.

                    I have a mower in Painted Post, and so don't have to transport one there (150 miles round trip), but for the in-laws, I'd have to ramp the mower into the van and take it to the other side of town. Frankly, it's exhausting, especially on these close to 90-degree days. BUT, you can't find a kid anymore!. The lawn services are ridiculously priced, asking $60 or more, for a job that can be done in thirty minutes. For awhile I had a guy in Painted Post, and our arrangement was that he'd mow in the middle of the month and I'd mow at the end of the month. But other than that first month, whenever I'd go there, it was apparent it hadn't been mowed in weeks. I'd call him and get one explanation or another and he'd say he'd come up and mow it in a few days. I told him I just mowed, so come in two weeks and my neighbor would tell me that he'd show up a couple days after I mowed, run his mower around anyway, then not show up again. We obviously couldn't get in sync and after three months I dropped him, and haven't found anyone since.

                    Personally, I can see the attraction of a rider, especially electric, but that Ryobi just seems expensive to me. I'm going to be 74 in another week or so. Seems like I've been mowing lawns for lawns for more than sixty years. Unfortunately the way my lawn is, I could never justify a rider and I guess my excuse is that need the exercise, or so I keep telling myself! Finding a neighbor kid sure would be nice though,

                    CWS
                    Last edited by cwsmith; 07-13-2018, 07:48 PM. Reason: Poor first drafts always need an edit.
                    Think it Through Before You Do!

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                    • #11
                      That price is insane for something that isn't self-driven and automatic. We were considering planting a small grass area for our dogs, and I was looking at the Dewalt for $400. This would be the first time I've had to mow a lawn as an adult. I hate grass, wife wants to make the dogs happy.

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                      • #12
                        I just thought about the battery life of SLA batteries. My seven year old Honda 21" electric start walk behind still has its original SLA battery and it works just fine. This battery does not have an external charger, so it can't be kept charged during winter storage, yet it still works great all summer. You just have to pull start it for the first use each spring. Unfortunately, the tires are completely bald (a common thing with Honda self propelled walk behinds). Doesn't affect mowing on level ground.
                        Last edited by Jim Frye; 07-13-2018, 07:38 PM.
                        Jim Frye
                        The Nut in the Cellar.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by twistsol View Post
                          Jim, for less than the price of the Ryobi, you could get a Husqvana robot mower from Lowes and sit on the porch while your lawn mows itself. A friend of mine who lives in town has one and has had no issues with it in 4 years. Unfortunately, I'd need a fleet of 4 of the high end mowers and an army of other robots to pick up sticks, apples, and walnuts in my yard in order to use it.
                          I've looked at the robotic mowers, including the new Honda unit, but grading on my property is far too uneven for them to work properly. My lawn is full of ruts and furrows from the slit seeder the landscaper used when the twits did the lawn. I was hoping the extreme weight of the RM480e (595 pounds plus my 220 pounds) will flatten things in the spring when the ground is soft.

                          This whole topic got started because SWMBO thinks I should have a rider to ease my aging knees. Right now, I walk to mow, walk to spread lawn food, and walk to do yard work. With a rider, I can tow the spreader, a lawn cart, and even an aerator. There is talk amongst some users of mounting a snow blade on it. My issue is that the second best (by ratings) small rider is the Cub Cadet CC30h and even though it's nearly half the price, it's not as good a mower as the Ryobi. The RM480e (and ex) came out in February of 2017, so maybe I can hold her off until next year and see what happens with the unit. The old Honda will run for many years and I'll just cheat my Son out of getting it for a while. He'll just have to make do with his cheapo big box store mower.

                          Jim Frye
                          The Nut in the Cellar.

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                          • #14
                            Something that I donít see anyone who mowes concerned much with is sharp blades. Everyone runs their mowers engines wide open, saying they factory manual says to do this! I say, duh dude, if I was selling lawnmowers I would want you to run wide open so I can sell you a new mower every 4 years I have 5-6 sets of blades for my mower that I keep sharp and install a fresh sharp blade every 4-5 cuts. This allows me to cut with my 3 1/2 acres with the motor running about 1/2 speed, getting a good cut with less noise and save the wear and tear on my motor. The mower still runs faster than my back can stand.

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                            • #15
                              Yes, I have two sets of blades for the mower and switch out about every 6 uses. It takes me five to silx minutes to draw file the edges on both blades (the Honda uses dual blades off set by a few degrees) and balance them. The sharp blades don't tear the grass so it doesn't turn brown on the ends and makes the lawn look greener. The sharp blades also mulch much better. The Honda runs at a constant rpm, but the sharper blades cut easier and the engine doesn't have to compensate because it loads up less. The walking speed is controlled by thumb paddles. It's sort of like a CVT transmission.
                              Jim Frye
                              The Nut in the Cellar.

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