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  • #46
    Just another update to annoy people. I last used the mower on 11/15/18 and put it away for the winter, even though we haven't really had any winter weather here yet. Per Ryobi's instructions, the mower has been plugged into the charger since then. I've since learned from Ryobi that the charging system (a processor in the charger and one in the mower) monitor the batteries continuously. If the pack voltage drops below 51 volts or every 30 days (whichever comes first), the system will do a "maintenance charge" automatically. I've monitored the system and this charge runs for about 3 hours when it kicks in (less than $0.05). Also replacement batteries can be had for $150 (HD wants $202) each at this writing. Since I use less than 10% of the charge each time, the battery gurus predict I will get at least 10 years out of the original set. The gas, oil, filters, and belts savings will pay for a total battery replacement more than two times over in that period. Oh yeah, they just released a front mounted snow plow for this mower. Now we just need snow to justify one. Our next car may well be all electric too.
    Last edited by Jim Frye; 01-03-2019, 08:06 PM.
    Jim Frye
    The Nut in the Cellar.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Carlos View Post
      I'm not sure if that was a typo or too many mixed negatives, but Lipo/Li-Ion batteries should NOT be left on the charger. If you want them to last, and be safe, you remove them from the chargers as soon as practical to do so.
      I think it depends upon the chargers themselves. Some chargers (of Li-Ion) cut off once charging is complete and some do not. I, or rather LOML has a Li-Ion charger for her cordless vac that says specifically to take the battery out after charging, but Ryobi's Lithium Ion battery charger says this:
      "
      • "INTELLIPORT TECHNOLOGY: This charger features a maintenance mode that knows when a battery is fully charged. Once full, this unit keeps those batteries conditioned for peak performance and maximized battery life. This uses less power than other charging units that never stop loading power into a battery, wasting energy and your money."
      Last edited by leehljp; 01-03-2019, 10:46 PM.
      Hank Lee

      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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      • #48
        You can never go wrong by removing them from the charger. You might or might not have a problem if you leave them on. Also, in nearly all cases, the charger remains warm, and cooler batteries last much longer (as shown in one of the charts I previously posted). I don't know how common it is, but there have been a few charger fires also, with batteries left in them.

        The wife has an 18650 charger that claims to be intelligent and safe to leave the batteries on. She complained of batteries going bad quickly, and I found that they stayed warm after charging. I told her to set a timer for the charge cycle and always remove them. The current battery set is now at double the life of the previous ones.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Carlos View Post
          You can never go wrong by removing them from the charger. You might or might not have a problem if you leave them on. Also, in nearly all cases, the charger remains warm, and cooler batteries last much longer (as shown in one of the charts I previously posted). I don't know how common it is, but there have been a few charger fires also, with batteries left in them.

          The wife has an 18650 charger that claims to be intelligent and safe to leave the batteries on. She complained of batteries going bad quickly, and I found that they stayed warm after charging. I told her to set a timer for the charge cycle and always remove them. The current battery set is now at double the life of the previous ones.
          Boy does this get confusing:

          -> "Follow the directions of the manufacture . . . and you will be safe "
          or
          -> "Don't follow the directions of the manufacture . . ."

          I leave my Ryobi lithium batteries in and when I forget and go back in the shop 3 to 4 days later, they are not hot; they are not warm. They are room temp. That seems to fit your requirements and Ryobi's operational specs.

          As to your note on warm batteries, I do agree. When batteries stay warm in a base, there is some trickle charging going on. That is common sense judgements - something is a-miss. But I haven't experienced that with my power tools lithium chargers - Ryobi or Hitachi.


          Hank Lee

          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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          • #50
            It's never wrong to remove them at the end of the cycle. It's sometimes wrong to leave them. Simple as that.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Carlos View Post
              It's never wrong to remove them at the end of the cycle. It's sometimes wrong to leave them. Simple as that.
              Ryobi should hire you so that you can teach them something!
              Hank Lee

              Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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              • #52
                I wasn't talking about Ryobi or any one battery or charger. In general, for all batteries, it is ALWAYS safe to remove them when done. It may or may not be safe to leave them. Therefore it's an easy and logical habit to just always remove them. If I walk by and see a "ready" light I pop the batteries out.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by leehljp View Post

                  Boy does this get confusing:

                  -> "Follow the directions of the manufacture . . . and you will be safe "
                  This is the right answer - follow the manufacturer's directions. Leaving the batteries in can damage them and can be unsafe, if they are not designed for that, and taking the batteries out can damage them and be unsafe, again if they are not designed for that. The manufacturer knows the design and what is best for that design, so it is best to follow their directions.
                  --------------------------------------------------
                  Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by woodturner View Post
                    and taking the batteries out can damage them and be unsafe
                    lol!!

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