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  • Router dust collection new idea

    Hey, I just saw this in Rocklers catalog https://www.rockler.com/dust-right-r...ado-dust-chute



    Click image for larger version  Name:	rockler router dust collector.jpg Views:	0 Size:	121.0 KB ID:	839975
    The traditional dust port on the router fence only works for edge routing. Who hasn't been groove routing and seen this line of dust shooting out in front of the workpiece?
    So I'm thinking I could make one of these for my shop vac hose. Fastened to the bottom edge of the end of the router table in line with the bit and just below the top so long workpieces can run off the end of the table. Probably the bristles aren't necessary if you have a good suction.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

  • #2
    I remember seeing Rockler's "coming soon" announcement of this in my local store; it seemed like a good/smart idea. Between then and now however I discovered another option for those with the Incra router lift mechanism: replacement insert rings that have slots in them to allow the router cabinet's dust collection to create vacuum near the bit. See Replacement Incra inserts. I bought a set and they work pretty well. Do they work as well as the Rocker idea? I don't know; I don't have the Rockler scoop. A few small holes/slots in the router table just outside the insert plate might work too.

    A while back I used thin plywood to make a box around my router for dust collection reasons. And to help quiet things down a little. These Incra rings would be useless without a box surrounding the router.

    I've often wondered if drilling small holes around and just in front of a table saw blade would help with dust collection, reducing the need for a dust hose on the blade guard itself. Especially on a BT3 style saw with a shroud around the blade concentrating the dust collection vacuum.

    mpc
    Last edited by mpc; 07-25-2020, 02:00 PM.

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    • #3
      If you look at the way a router bit cuts, it is not surprising that most of the cuttings want to get thrown out the side by the spinning action of the bit and its its on a near zero clearance insert the main way for cuttings to go in a grooving operation is out the groove just made. Thus the picture of the dust being thrown out the front is what you get in my experience.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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      • #4
        The holes around the blades does some dust collection. I find that it does attract splinters and cause problems with wood feeding by the blade.

        Is the Rockler Addo chute 2” or 4”? I use a 4” hose with and elbow on it, right of my dust collector header, in front of my table saw blade. The blade always squirts a good stream of dust out the front and this fitting would do great for that if it was 4”. The brush bristles are good to take up a small gap, whereas the 4” elbow outletI is prone to grab the wood

        edit... I see it is 2 1/2”, oh well, not much good comes from reducing down from 4” to 2 1/2”
        The 4” fitting I use does interfere with the movement of rip fence, so more invention work is necessary to make this type fitting work on a table saw.
        Last edited by capncarl; 07-25-2020, 05:27 PM.

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        • #5
          I find very little going exactly how they pictured it. I have a 4" DC port into the cabinet below the table, in a sealed area, so it sucks from around the blade. And a 2.5" DC into the opening in the fence. This catches almost everything. The stuff that ends up not being caught simply doesn't shoot off the end of the table like that. Of course, everyone's uses will vary, but I find it dubious unless you don't have good DC already.

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          • #6
            In my experience when routing a dado or grove in the surface of a board on the route table only the first 2 or 3 inches of the cut are blown clear. This has been with hardwoods, soft woods, MDF, and plywood. The chips are just too light to retain velocity and overcome the resistance of the sides and bottom of the groove to go that far. I always have to dig the chips out of the groove where they are firmly packed.
            just another brick in the wall...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Black walnut View Post
              In my experience when routing a dado or grove in the surface of a board on the route table only the first 2 or 3 inches of the cut are blown clear. This has been with hardwoods, soft woods, MDF, and plywood. The chips are just too light to retain velocity and overcome the resistance of the sides and bottom of the groove to go that far. I always have to dig the chips out of the groove where they are firmly packed.
              On the first of 3 or 4 boards to cut a dado, I do as the OP shows, and then realize like Mark does that it only sticks in the groves after the first several inches. THEN I get smart and set up my TS for the right depth and fence to run a couple of grooves down the board(s) and then use the router for full dados. The one or two saw kerf grooves sets up router dados well. I don't seem to make dados enough to remember this. But invariably, I seem to use this habit.

              I know some of you will ask why not just do a dado on the saw in the first place. For some, that will work well, but I hate changing out saw blades for dados (with all of its adjustments for precise dados) for 10 to 15 minutes work. If I am going to do considerable work, I will go with the dado blade.
              Hank Lee

              Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Black walnut View Post
                In my experience when routing a dado or grove in the surface of a board on the route table only the first 2 or 3 inches of the cut are blown clear. This has been with hardwoods, soft woods, MDF, and plywood. The chips are just too light to retain velocity and overcome the resistance of the sides and bottom of the groove to go that far. I always have to dig the chips out of the groove where they are firmly packed.
                After adding dust collection under the router, I almost never end up with junk inside of a dado.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carlos View Post

                  After adding dust collection under the router, I almost never end up with junk inside of a dado.
                  Carlos you must have real dust collection. I only use a shopvac. I don't think it moves enough air to suck all the chips down.
                  just another brick in the wall...

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                  • #10
                    It doesn't take a huge flow, as long as you don't have leaks and aren't cutting a huge path. I do use a rather good DC now, but had good results with a large shop-vac too. My cabinet is totally sealed though, and the only air entries are the area around the blade and behind it. The vac sucks the wood onto the table.

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                    • #11
                      OK, I did a little playing around.everyone is basically right that the cuttings from a grooving bit remain in the groove or are sucked below the table plate once the first few 2-4 inches of the groove is cut, rather than shooting out the front as the Rocker illustration shows.

                      I did this for some 1/2" diameter straight bits both the straight flutes and with spiral upcut bits - didn't really seem to make a difference but of course the downcut bits are supposed to leave clear edges. And the upcut bits remove cuttings from the groove. As usual I use upcut and downcut with reference to the router position being on top (handheld) as is the custom.

                      So I did make a dust collection tray for the end of the router table since a lot of dust does accumulate on mine from various cutting operations.
                      Click image for larger version  Name:	20200805_183544_resized.jpg Views:	6 Size:	64.6 KB ID:	840168

                      It clamps to the bottom edge of the outfeed side of the table and is angled up slightly but its edge is below the table height and is still useful for sweeping dust off the table with a small brush and it gets sucked up without falling on the floor.
                      I wish it worked like the Rockler picture but it doesn't. I think the basic Rockler device advertised won't work as intended.
                      Last edited by LCHIEN; 08-06-2020, 01:42 AM.
                      Loring in Katy, TX USA
                      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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