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Bit holder for Impact Driver?

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  • Bit holder for Impact Driver?

    Is there such a thing as a one or two bit - "bit holder" that attaches to an impact driver somehow or to a drill somehow?

    I often use two different drive bits with my impact driver (a Phillips bit and square drive bit, or a Phillips and star drive) when making something, and if I take one out and set it down, it rolls away or gets knocked off of the table, or just plain hides. This frustrates me. Some drills and impact drivers have a very ineffective magnet holder that only work if you don't move the ID.

    Have any of you had this problem and Did you solve it?

    I am looking for some kind of bit holder that attaches to the impact driver so that the extra bit is WITH the ID or drill during the construction time. I could certainly use this with drill bits also.

    I have thought about those rubber key chuck holders but they are made for chuck holder only.

    ADDED IN: I have one ID that has a "clip". It does not work well. Short, bits get stuck in it and are hard to retrieve. I mostly use bits 2 inches long or longer. The longer ones stick out of those built in clips and get bumped easily, making the fall out.

    Any discussions or recommendations would be appreciated.
    Last edited by leehljp; 11-26-2018, 01:53 PM.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

  • #2
    I have something called a bit bag or bit pouch or something like that that I got for Christmas a few years ago. It is a small zippered bag with a velcro strap to attach it to the drill. It also has a magnetic front that is supposted to hold screws but I use the magnet for the bits I'm currently using. The velcro strap makes changing out the battery a little slower, but not enough to be an issue.
    Chr's
    __________
    An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
    A moral man does it.

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    • #3
      Lee,

      Here's a handy little item that might help: http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...=1,42363,42356

      I've also seen hardware holding wrist bands, like this one from Rockler: https://www.rockler.com/magnetic-wri...iABEgJN9_D_BwE

      And this one from Walmart: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Magnetic-...SABEgKqrvD_BwE

      My old Ridgid 14.4 V has a single bit spring-clip on the back, just above the handle and it came with a double-end bit. Also, my old Ryobi drill driver has similar clips located up above the trigger, if I'm remembering correctly.

      Hope this helps,

      CWS
      Think it Through Before You Do!

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      • #4
        Thanks for the input fellows!

        I don't know why I haven't seen or paid attention to the magnetic wrist pads before, but I looked on Amazon after seeing the post and there were quite a few magnetic wrist pads listed. Might be just what I need - probably 2 in case I misplace one.
        Hank Lee

        Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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        • #5
          I have a drawer full of magnetic bit holders that I seldom use. Nothing worse than to loose a bit ina deep recess. I just buy contractor packs of bits in various types and lengths and not worry about the bit holder.
          capncarl

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          • #6
            Could you hot glue a rare earth magnet somewhere on yours?

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            • #7
              A hex bit rolls off the table? What kind of angles are you working at. Maybe you should buy a new square to make your table

              According to my quick shop research just done, a hex bit will easily stay in place on a slope of up to 20 degrees. Although a little bit before that it will roll off if given a nudge or a shake.. Geometric theory says it should be able to make 30 degrees before it automatically rolls off.
              If you place the bit pointing in the direction of the slope, its even harder to make it roll off..

              OK, go to HF and buy one of the stainless magnetic parts holders - it has a powerful magnet and a nice rubber base that will hold your steel bit with a grip of death and will stay put due to the rubber base. Good place to put your fasteners, too! Don't they roll off your work surface sooner than the bits?
              .
              https://www.harborfreight.com/4-inch...ray-90566.html
              Often times you get a coupon for one along with the 20% off coupon. I have three. Cheap even if you don't have the free coupon, use the 20% off coupon.
              They have a 6" one, too very cheap that's bigger.

              Click image for larger version  Name:	90566_I.jpg Views:	1 Size:	64.6 KB ID:	835350
              Last edited by LCHIEN; 11-29-2018, 03:02 AM.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
                A hex bit rolls off the table? What kind of angles are you working at. Maybe you should buy a new square to make your table

                According to my quick shop research just done, a hex bit will easily stay in place on a slope of up to 20 degrees. Although a little bit before that it will roll off if given a nudge or a shake.. Geometric theory says it should be able to make 30 degrees before it automatically rolls off.
                If you place the bit pointing in the direction of the slope, its even harder to make it roll off..

                OK, go to HF and buy one of the stainless magnetic parts holders - it has a powerful magnet and a nice rubber base that will hold your steel bit with a grip of death and will stay put due to the rubber base. Good place to put your fasteners, too! Don't they roll off your work surface sooner than the bits?
                Loring, I appreciate the laughs this morning!

                As to the magnetic parts holder, I never gave it a thought for some reason. But most of the time it is a single bit or driver that I am interchanging with another. The magnetic parts holder should do perfectly in most instances. But I will probably need 3 or 4, And spray paint them neon green, yellow or orange for quick find! thanks for the suggestion.

                ATGCPAUL: I thought about that but have not done it.
                Hank Lee

                Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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                • #9
                  Hank, only need one, just toss the bit in the general direction of the tray and it gets sucked right up by the magnet.
                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How about glueing a magnet to the he back of your dust collector remote that you keep around your neck?

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                    • #11
                      I read this thread with interest as I have a different "solution" that may or may not match how you want to work. We all do things differently.

                      1. I generally try to work near some surface now. I have a rolling cart, some small folding tables, and of course the typical workbench. All places where I can set something down. Sometimes just on the surface, sometimes in small rectangular plastic trays (which hold parts and driver bits).

                      2. Two drivers. I have a 12v and 20v driver, 12v and 20v drills. I make use of multiple drivers and drills so I'm not changing out bits much. Sure, sometimes you need the power of 20v for everything, but often not. Same with drills, like having the pilot in one and the counter-sink in the other.

                      3. Magnetic wrist wrap, $9 on Amazon. Holds screws and bits to my wrist. Used only when working away from a surface.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Carlos View Post
                        I read this thread with interest as I have a different "solution" that may or may not match how you want to work. We all do things differently.

                        1. I generally try to work near some surface now. I have a rolling cart, some small folding tables, and of course the typical workbench. All places where I can set something down. Sometimes just on the surface, sometimes in small rectangular plastic trays (which hold parts and driver bits).

                        2. Two drivers. I have a 12v and 20v driver, 12v and 20v drills. I make use of multiple drivers and drills so I'm not changing out bits much. Sure, sometimes you need the power of 20v for everything, but often not. Same with drills, like having the pilot in one and the counter-sink in the other.

                        3. Magnetic wrist wrap, $9 on Amazon. Holds screws and bits to my wrist. Used only when working away from a surface.
                        Carlos,
                        You described my general method of work. I keep 4 routers around (and need 1 more) so that I don't have to switch bits and have to precisely re-set them 3 or 4 times in a project. As to drills, I used to haver two cordless impact drivers and two cordless drills. (I gave one each to a grandson who uses them regularly.) It sure is nice to not have to switch drill bits or driver bits every 2 to 3 minutes when work starts flowing, But that "flowing" only happens two or three times a year, so I can manage with one each of drill & impact driver.

                        I ordered (from Amazon) a wrist magnet (yellow) so that I could spot it easily and to see how well I work with that. I will pick up a couple of magnet dishes the next time I am at HF. I need one for the shop and one for in the house. (And I will spray them a neon color to be able to spot them quickly.)

                        I have contemplated some kind of magnetic holder on the DD and ID to hold bits but the shape of the DD and ID themselves dictate whether the use will be efficient or not. I haven't stopped to look at them in detail to see where to locate a magnet so that it does not interfere with normal use.
                        Hank Lee

                        Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's funny, I own only a single router. But I rarely use it anyway. I like square edges on almost everything. I'd hate to be without multiple drivers and may actually pick up one more.

                          You don't need to spray the magnetic holders, they are shiny silver and easy to spot. Just keep in mind they magnetize everything, which could be good or bad for different applications. But they sure are useful, so I have a bunch in both sizes. I generally prefer the smaller one.

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