Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

BT3100 Maintenance-Best way to access saw parts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BT3100 Maintenance-Best way to access saw parts

    Good morning,

    I have a BT3100 and the blade raise and lower mechanism has started to become more difficult during the last several uses. I found in the extensive FAQ document the points to lubricate. However, is there an easy way to gain access to these points. The saw is currently attached to the stand, and getting under there last night made it clear this was going to be more than a 30-minute project to clean and lubricate this.

    Does anyone have any tips as to the best way to tune up your saw (e.g. remove from stand and invert on a bench??) ?

    Thanks,
    Rob

  • #2
    The most important is to lubricate the vertical ways that the locker bracket (motor and arbor) ride on the shims. For me this means taking off the blade and running the raising mechanism allt he way up, then all the way down a couple of times wihile I work in the Johnson's Paste Wax.

    The second part is to keep the elevation screw clean and lubed.... Don't let it get jammed with sawdust; I use a 2 HP dust collector pulling on the rear dust chute and also pulling on a dist pan I've fastened across the bottom of my saw - not well sealed or anything, just so it sucks up all the dust that would normally settle on every part inside the saw. This keeps the interior really clean and I have not had any parts jamming. in my 1998 BT3000.
    If you need to the innards can be accessed by pulling off the left or right side panels... The right is going to have some wires attached,
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 07-19-2019, 01:34 AM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • #3
      My 1993 BT3000 is still on itís original shims. I do much the same as Loring described, except Iíve used graphite powder puffed into the sliding area. Also used it on the elevation screw. My saw is all closed up except for the front tilt quadrant and connected to my 165 cfm ShopVac. See the articles in the archive section on how to enclose the saws.
      Jim Frye
      The Nut in the Cellar.

      Comment


      • #4
        Itís too bad this saw is built like a washing machine, no practical way for the owner to maintain or service. If Ryobi had enough forward thinking to build in an access panel so the owner could service the innards probably half of the belt and adjustment screw posts wouldnít be here and just maybe they would still be making and selling this great saw.
        capncarl

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by capncarl View Post
          Itís too bad this saw is built like a washing machine, no practical way for the owner to maintain or service. If Ryobi had enough forward thinking to build in an access panel so the owner could service the innards probably half of the belt and adjustment screw posts wouldnít be here and just maybe they would still be making and selling this great saw.
          capncarl
          You can remove the ends of the cabinet to gain easier access to the innards. Six screws each end. I did this when I had to replace the belts I melted on my BT3000. I never did understand why Ryobi discontinued the BT3100. For $300 it was a bigger steal than the $500 BT3000. I think if they had brought out more accessories for it, it might have lasted longer on the market. I was told a long time ago that they sold over 600,000 of the BT3000s. One problem was the saw was so out of the box designwise, a lot of folks didn't understand it's capabilities. It didn't look like a traditional tablesaw, so therefore, it couldn't be any good.
          Jim Frye
          The Nut in the Cellar.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by capncarl View Post
            Itís too bad this saw is built like a washing machine, no practical way for the owner to maintain or service. If Ryobi had enough forward thinking to build in an access panel so the owner could service the innards probably half of the belt and adjustment screw posts wouldnít be here and just maybe they would still be making and selling this great saw.
            capncarl
            I agree with what Jim said above. People's perception taints the truth about things when reality is totally different. As mentioned, It has panels that can be take off; it can be laid back or turned upside down, - I have done all three. The first time I wanted to check on something underneath, I spent more time trying to figure out what I wanted to do than I did removing a panel or turning the saw upside down.

            That said, and getting back to "wrong perceptions", Norm Havens used to collect notes on problems with the Unisaw. The Unisaw had about as many problems in QC (Quality Control) as the BT3x, but because it was a radical design, the BT was looked down upon. Erroneous conclusions were drawn and spread. My dad had a 12" Unisaw that had a slight vibration that did not affect his using it for the making of custom sized pallets and skids, but if used for something like cabinetry, it had to be re-adjusted and calibrated about once a week. When he bought it, it was about 15 years old and the previous owner had the same problem; I did not have to do that with my BT3000 or 3100. I sold the Unisaw shortly after he passed.

            The 3000/3100 doesn't hold its settings well if bounced around in the back of a pickup, but neither does a biesemeyer fence do well if one accidentally drops a 2x4 on top of it when try set the 2x4 on the table for ripping.
            Hank Lee

            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

            Comment


            • #7
              You can remove the ends of the cabinets to gain access to the innards? ?? WHY DIDNT YOU POST THIS AS SOON AS Indywar2 asked the question?

              Comment


              • LCHIEN
                LCHIEN commented
                Editing a comment
                I posted that you could remove the end panels, in post #2 of this thread.

            • #8
              Originally posted by capncarl View Post
              You can remove the ends of the cabinets to gain access to the innards? ?? WHY DIDNT YOU POST THIS AS SOON AS Indywar2 asked the question?
              Sorry, it didn't occur to me at first that someone might not have, or read, the Operator''s Manual. Page 36 shows it pretty plainly. And you can also remove the blade shroud cover with a few screws to get better access to the locker bracket. The OM and the parts list show it. And the saw cabinet is bolted to the stand with four nuts/bolts at the corners of the cabinet/stand.
              Last edited by Jim Frye; 07-20-2019, 02:53 PM. Reason: Added blather
              Jim Frye
              The Nut in the Cellar.

              Comment


              • #9
                Capncarl, when he asked about "tune up" and "invert", to be honest, I was trying to figure out what he wanted. I tune up my saw from the top - the sliding miter table, the fence, squaring etc. I lube the sliders from the top too. I have my 3000 on a Bosch Gravity-Rise table saw stand, with means the saw is on its side when not in use. I just clean and lube from there when I see it its needed - maybe once a year.

                When I brought my saw home from Japan, I think that was the first time I took the panels off and in fact took everything apart except the motor, motor mount and sliding mount rails. I left that intact.

                I should have answered as best I could understand, and apologize.
                Last edited by leehljp; 07-20-2019, 04:58 PM.
                Hank Lee

                Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                Comment


                • #10
                  I'm always amazed that people don't bother with manuals on most anything. The most amazing is cars. You spend tens of thousands on something you hope to keep for quite a while, and can't be bothered to put an hour into reading? I've lost count of how many times someone has said they didn't know their own car had some little feature.

                  Back to the topic, once you're in there, consider a good dry lube like the one linked below, or Triflow. The Dupont stuff is fantastic around the shop, and doesn't attract/hold dust.

                  https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

                  Comment


                  • cwsmith
                    cwsmith commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Carlos,

                    I spent my career illustrating and writing parts catalogs, installation, operation, and maintenance manuals; not for Ryobi, but for several other companies like Ingersoll-Rand, IBM, GE, Hilliard, Corning, and several others that don't come to mind at present. The joke often injected from Engineering was that, "Nobody reads this stuff". Still, you do it like its the most important thing to the customer and to the product. Personally, I find Ryobi's literature to be pretty darn good.

                    CWS

                • #11
                  RTFM! Iíve been focusing lately on the Ryobi electric riding lawn mower I bought last fall. I have a neighbor two doors down that has one also and we are both immersing ourselves deeply in the new technology and design. More ďout of the box designĒ like the BT3000. I bet at least 20 - 30 percent of the questions on these products can be answered by the web page descriptions on HDís web pages or the .pdf manuals listed on those pages. I fail to understand how one can spend $2,700 to $4,100 for something and not spend the time to read about it when itís right in front of your face. Oh yeah, read. Nobody seems to be willing/able to read anymore. I recall one question asking if there was a video covering how to remove the batteries. Yes, the Use and Care Manual details the step by step process en a couple of pages.
                  Last edited by Jim Frye; 07-20-2019, 09:21 PM.
                  Jim Frye
                  The Nut in the Cellar.

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    I sold my Ryobi saw, the Craftsman 21829 6 years ago. I donít think the craftsman version had removable panels..... thus my statement about being made like a washing machine. On a lighter note, In my previous house our laundry room was wide enough for a washing machine and a dryer and maybe a broom jammed in between them. After fighting a mysterious water leak on the washing machine where I replaced the water pump, hoses and belts, the dang thing still leaked. Rather than take the personnel door off, remove a storage cabinet and all manner of clutter..... again so I could turn the whole machine upside down... again. I chose to make my own access opening in the front of the machine. I borrowed the biggest hole saw one of my contractors had that my drill would turn, a massive 10Ē saw, and cut a round hole in the lower front. My wife wasnít impressed with me cutting up her washing machine.m I was able to easily find and fix the problem. I wouldnít hesitate at all cutting an access hole in my saw or other piece of large equipment to be able to service its innards.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Every washing machine I've worked on had a removable front panel, so I was confused by the washing machine comment.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        I hate to bust your bubble, but our latest washing machine doesnít have a removable panel either.
                        All the guy wanted is someone with knowledge of the saw to advise him how to repair it, not a lecture on reading a manual that he may not have.
                        Enough of this chatter, itís not doing this site any good. Iím sorry I contributed to it.
                        I would suggest that this post be removed before some of the other sites discover that we have become as bad as they are!
                        capncarl


                        Click image for larger version

Name:	CD1EA7A6-C89E-4F03-8336-F3A82BAA5200.jpeg
Views:	142
Size:	79.7 KB
ID:	837052

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          FWIW, and to clarify things for any future visitors, the Craftsman 21829 had the same cabinet as the BT3000 with removable ends, just painted red. Don't be offended Capn, folks were just trying to make things clear.

                          Also FWIW, our new GE washer does not have a removeable front either. The top is hinged to raise up and the back is removable for service. all connections are in the top console area above the removable back panel.
                          Jim Frye
                          The Nut in the Cellar.

                          Comment


                          • LCHIEN
                            LCHIEN commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Agree. 21829 same basic build as the BT3s.
                        Working...
                        X