Non-turned: Rifle Cleaning Stand

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  • Sam Conder
    Woodworker Once More
    • Dec 2002
    • 2502
    • Midway, KY
    • Delta 36-725T2

    Non-turned: Rifle Cleaning Stand

    Depends on how much wood putty I have on hand.

    Sam Conder
    Sam Conder
    BT3Central's First Member

    "I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work." -Thomas A. Edison
  • Stytooner
    Roll Tide RIP Lee
    • Dec 2002
    • 4301
    • Robertsdale, AL, USA.
    • BT3100

    #2
    I can get greater than a 1/64th" accuracy with the micro-positioning device. I am pleased with a 64th accuracy on my chessboards, box joints and tenons. 1/4" for rough carpentry is pretty sorry. [}]

    1/16" or better is desired.

    Lee

    Lee

    Comment

    • twistsol
      Veteran Member
      • Dec 2002
      • 2901
      • Cottage Grove, MN, USA.
      • Ridgid R4512, 2x ShopSmith Mark V 520, 1951 Shopsmith 10ER

      #3
      If LOML can see the joint, it's too big. LOML can spot a virus at 200 yards, but can't see coloring books, magazines, or toys on the living room floor.

      Consulting - If you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made prolonging the problem.

      Chr's
      Chr's
      __________
      An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
      A moral man does it.

      Comment

      • Sawduster
        Established Member
        • Dec 2002
        • 342
        • Cedar Park, TX, USA.

        #4
        quote:Originally posted by Stytooner

        I can get greater than a 1/64th" accuracy with the micro-positioning device. I am pleased with a 64th accuracy on my chessboards, box joints and tenons. 1/4" for rough carpentry is pretty sorry. [}]

        1/16" or better is desired.

        Lee

        I concur. Anyhting less than 1/64th is probably irrelevant. Remember, we are working with a living media. It is gonna move. All the hoopla over .005 " of runout on a saw blade is crap.

        Now rough work? Had a fella on my crew years ago when I hung drywall for a living. His previous experience had been doing piecework in CA where even then they were specialized. One crew hung the ceilings, another came in and did walls. Different piece rates for each. His favorite saying was, "It'll tape." We worked by the hour, and the little extra time it took to leave a corner intact, or a butt joint closed made up for the additional time it took the finishers to fix the mess.

        Putting in a window over the weekend with an opening underneath for an AC I had a horizontal member that did not friction fit where a hammer tap was needed to get it in place. In fact it was so bad that I could actually see a little light along part of the edge. Tossed that 2 X 4 to the shorts pile and recut it so I didn't have to hold it by hand to measure the length of the uprights that went under it. With that kind of attention to detail I'd get fired on the typical framing crew, but the window, when set into the opening was plumb and level without shims underneath, and the AC fit right snug in the opening under it.

        Jerry

        "Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
        ~ Thomas Paine ~





        Jerry

        \"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.\"
        ~ Thomas Paine ~





        http://www.sawdustersplace.com

        Comment

        • jrhardie
          Established Member
          • Dec 2002
          • 123
          • Soddy Daisy, TN, USA.

          #5
          When I was doing plywood and 2X4 woodworking I would be satisfied with "close enough". Then after buying expensive QSWO and other furniture grade lumber I decided to get some decent measuring tools and have been very happy with the results. I typically use a couple of Incra tools now and the tolerances have come way down.

          Jim in TN.
          \"The gene pool could use a little chlorine.\"

          Jim in TN.

          Comment

          • RodKirby
            Veteran Member
            • Dec 2002
            • 3136
            • Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
            • Mao Shan TSC-10RAS

            #6
            I go for 1/256", but then I'm funny that way [)]

            If I measure/mark/cut right, my BT3000 does it every time [8D]

            A Professional is someone who does what they say they will do.
            Downunder ... 1" = 25.4mm

            Comment

            • Stytooner
              Roll Tide RIP Lee
              • Dec 2002
              • 4301
              • Robertsdale, AL, USA.
              • BT3100

              #7
              Rod, I had no doubt about your tolerances.


              Lee

              Lee

              Comment

              • leehljp
                Just me
                • Dec 2002
                • 8441
                • Tunica, MS
                • BT3000/3100

                #8
                Since our beloved saw will cut in such small increments, I measure in frog's hairs, smidgins and whats that new measuring system . . Poofteenth.

                Hank
                Hank Lee

                Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                Comment

                • DUD
                  Royal Jester
                  • Dec 2002
                  • 3309
                  • Jonesboro, Arkansas, USA.
                  • Ryobi BT3000

                  #9
                  If she's happy it's good enough. Bill

                  If You can't be good for nothing, do it for free!
                  5 OUT OF 4 PEOPLE DON'T UNDERSTAND FRACTIONS.

                  Comment

                  • pnctar
                    Senior Member
                    • Jan 2003
                    • 537
                    • Arlington, TX, USA.
                    • Ryobi BT3000

                    #10
                    Guess I'm a little a... too. Install custom screen doors all day that are guanteed within 1/16". If I'm not within 1/64" it ain't close enough and I'll go down to 1/256" even though I KNOW it's gonna move and give. Comes from working on guns to long.

                    pnctar
                    Shadow box?! and you want it when?
                    Steve
                    There are no mistakes in woodworking, only opportunities to reevaluate the design! - Jim Tolpin

                    Comment

                    • LCHIEN
                      Internet Fact Checker
                      • Dec 2002
                      • 20977
                      • Katy, TX, USA.
                      • BT3000 vintage 1999

                      #11
                      probably 1/32 is good enough for most furniture and stuff.
                      On puzzles, jigs and small items I make I like to try and hold about 0.010" which is between 1/64" and 1/128" using calipers and stuff.

                      Machinists can hold about .001" to .003" in aluminum, brass, and steel, but their material is much more stable with temperature and humidity, not like wood which grows and shrinks.




                      Loring in Katy, TX USA
                      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                      Loring in Katy, TX USA
                      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                      Comment

                      • Sawduster
                        Established Member
                        • Dec 2002
                        • 342
                        • Cedar Park, TX, USA.

                        #12
                        quote:Originally posted by RodKirby

                        I go for 1/256", but then I'm funny that way [)]

                        If I measure/mark/cut right, my BT3000 does it every time [8D]

                        A Professional is someone who does what they say they will do.
                        That seems to be a bit intolerant to me.

                        Brings to mind what an old woodworker told me about measuring and cutting. You measure with the most accurate instrument you have, mark the cut line with a sharp knife, then split the cut line with the edge of your saw blade. How accurate is that? I can see 1/64" on a very fine measuring instrument, 1/128" I don't believe I could see, and 1/256th" I don't think I could visuallize in my mind.

                        Jerry

                        "Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it."
                        ~ Thomas Paine ~





                        Jerry

                        \"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.\"
                        ~ Thomas Paine ~





                        http://www.sawdustersplace.com

                        Comment

                        • RodKirby
                          Veteran Member
                          • Dec 2002
                          • 3136
                          • Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
                          • Mao Shan TSC-10RAS

                          #13
                          Jerry - You're right of course. It was a "tongue in cheek" post!

                          Depending on the situation...
                          - If two work pieces need to be the same length, then +/- zero is my margin of error.
                          - If two pieces are being joined (rabbet), I cut the rabbet a "poofteenth" deeper to allow for glue.
                          - IMHO Using stops/fences allows us to get very close (1/256"?) to +/- zero.
                          - etc., etc.

                          I will always work towards this end.

                          A Professional is someone who does what they say they will do.
                          Downunder ... 1" = 25.4mm

                          Comment

                          • John L
                            Forum Newbie
                            • Apr 2003
                            • 20
                            • .

                            #14
                            Ever heard the expression: Split a hair - well Rob probably has a jig to do it on the BT3100.... lol.

                            John L.

                            Comment

                            • LCHIEN
                              Internet Fact Checker
                              • Dec 2002
                              • 20977
                              • Katy, TX, USA.
                              • BT3000 vintage 1999

                              #15
                              quote:Originally posted by Sawduster

                              I can see 1/64" on a very fine measuring instrument, 1/128" I don't believe I could see, and 1/256th" I don't think I could visuallize in my mind.
                              1/256" is about .004" which is the thickness of a dollar bill.

                              Stack up 256 dollar bills and you'll have ... [8)] $256. [8D]


                              Loring in Katy, TX USA
                              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                              Loring in Katy, TX USA
                              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                              BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                              Comment

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