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Wall-flush table and accommodating the baseboard

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  • Wall-flush table and accommodating the baseboard

    I'm building a long, narrow table to go against the wall in our entry hallway. The top is solid 8/4 bubinga and the legs are solid 6/4 flame/tiger maple maple. They will be cut as a wedge on one side, so the back goes straight up the wall, and the front is angled back. The legs will also angle outward towards the long ends. See photo. What you your ideas for accommodating the baseboard? A notch? Then the leg and top would be flush to the wall, but the bottom will probably look weird. Or just nothing flush to the wall? Or offset the top so that it is flush, and the legs are not? Hard decision. It's pretty much impossible to hold it in place for a mockup because of the angles and high weight.
    Last edited by Carlos; 11-27-2019, 04:48 PM.

  • #2
    I like 2 splayed conventional tapered leg. Put a French cleat on the wall to support the top to the wall, or 2 straight up legs just out from the baseboard. The board legs look out of place on a table.

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    • #3
      The look is intentional, and we both hate normal table legs and traditional woodworking looks. The entire reason I build stuff myself is so it doesn't look like what everyone else makes and is commonly available. But the question is moot, the wife decided to make two design changes. First, she wants a huge cove along the entire top edge, which doesn't change this, but means figuring out if I can have the local shop just do that on their shaper, or I get a huge expensive bit and make 300 passes with the router. She also wants the legs to be symmetrical, with an angle on both sides, not just the front. So that means the wall spacing is solved/irrelevant. Now to calculate all the angles, and see if my crappy Harbor Freight angle jig can handle this. It's a great excuse to buy something from Incra, but the stores are closed today.

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      • #4
        Interesting idea. I tend to agree with the cap'n. To keep your design it seems notching the legs to fit the profile of the baseboard would be best.
        just another brick in the wall...

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        • #5
          It's been changed so the legs will not be against the wall, they will angle on both sides rather than just the front. And they are already narrower than the top, so the baseboard isn't an issue any more.

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          • #6
            What kind of cove is she wanting around the top?
            A few years ago I used the tablesaw to creat coves for column looking plant stands. The jig directed the wood diagonally across a slightly raised and tilted saw blade, kinda scary and blew sawdust everywhere. The cut was remarkably smooth and required little sanding. I don’t know how you could direct wood around a corner though.

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            • #7
              She's not specific, and yeah, the saw at an angle is an option. Does sound scary. The weight and size of this piece could work in my favor, as the saw wouldn't be able to push it easily. She'd like it to have more than half the thickness cut off.

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              • #8
                She has approved the look of my largest cove bit, so problem solved.

                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  That’s the look I was cutting into the columns, about 3/4” cove, except with using the table saw you can cut coves in the center of a wide board. I was cutting 4 evenly spaced coves in an 8” wide board. Isn’t your cut called a reverse bullnose?

                  Cutting coves on the tablesaw wasn’t a bad as I indicated, it just required an extra measure of safety awareness because you have an open blade. Little difference than using a jointer. Friends on mine have a table saw set up like this just to make raised panel doors.

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                  • #10
                    Ah, interesting idea. I thought you meant something else. I'm not sure if I want to do that, but it's worth looking at. I may have some scraps to try it on, then visualize the results. Not sure if I want to for this piece, but I see what you mean about giving big planks some definition.

                    I don't know about the terms or how they are different. The box of router bits calls it a cove. I think they might be the same?

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                    • #11
                      Correct, I wouldn’t do this operation on this job, it’s suited for flat boards, not ends. You wouldn’t won’t to learn a new procedure at this time in the project.

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                      • #12
                        It rained for a day, and now the boards are warped diagonally. Yay. Hope they flatten a bit as the humidity gets normal. But certainly can't try this on them now.

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                        • #13
                          If one day of humidity warped the top how will it respond when complete? I would be concerned that the top is not yet stable.
                          just another brick in the wall...

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                          • #14
                            It depends on your final finish whether the piece will continually move around. Get it like you want it and shellac the fool out of it completely. Hopefully then the moisture will stay inside or outside of the wood.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Black walnut View Post
                              If one day of humidity warped the top how will it respond when complete? I would be concerned that the top is not yet stable.
                              The wood was in my shop for around ten years before being cut. I have no idea what it did in that time. It was cut and prepped in spring, then it got too hot to do any shop time. So it sat around partially worked for a few months. Today, it's actually even more warped, and it was the last of my 6/4 flame maple.

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