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  • #16
    Jim Frye:
    I discovered that I had to make jigs to install the slides properly. Ah, learning curve. This is also the first furniture carcass I've designed completely on my own with no published plans to work from. I'm working from just the picture I posted in the first post of this thread. When I get the slides installed, I'll post a picture.
    OH the joy of discovery! I do this often, no published plans, a few simple drawings, maybe an overall measurement or two from which to fit everything inside; think it through while driving on straight flat roads for half an hour, go to sleep going over measurements in my head and then suddenly sitting up as an adjustment to allow for kerf or wider slide as you mentioned.

    IF wood magazines have to do corrections on featured article measurements regularly, we shouldn't feel bad about needed and unplanned adjustments either.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #17
      No picture update. Just a note that I decided to completely finish the interior of the cabinet prior to installing the drawer slides. Two reasons. It’s easier now than after the slides are installed and it will give the varnish time to fully cure (I.e. the smell goes away) before the carcass gets closed up. Many years ago, I did a hutch base and the inside stunk for months. I even stuffed the inside with news print to absorb the off gases of the polyurethane.
      Jim Frye
      The Nut in the Cellar.

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      • #18
        Today, I had time to work in the shop so I spent four hours mounting the full extension drawer slides. First time with these and I guess there was some learning curve. I made a marking jig with a 12" spirit level attached to locate the holes for the slides, but quickly discovered that I needed at least three hands to use it. The length of the jig (28") was just too long to hold steady and mark the points to drill for screws. I ended up turning the carcass on end so the jig would be horizontal and lay on the frame, but I eventually got it done. I also see that if I had purchased the slides at the beginning of this project, I would have put horizontals in where the slides would mount. This probably would have kept the back from bowing and I wouldn't have had to put the two center members in after the fact. I'm going to put structure in where the slides are just to support those interior slides better. Here's a couple of images of today's efforts. I also have the top clamped up in cauls to keep it flat until it's time to mount it on the finished carcass with the drawers. Drawer construction is up next along with attached decorative fronts.

        Click image for larger version  Name:	20200125_164357.jpg Views:	9 Size:	112.3 KB ID:	838478Click image for larger version  Name:	20200125_164447.jpg Views:	8 Size:	100.0 KB ID:	838479Click image for larger version  Name:	20200120_184157.jpg Views:	8 Size:	133.5 KB ID:	838480
        Last edited by Jim Frye; 01-27-2020, 08:00 PM. Reason: added text about my foolishness.
        Jim Frye
        The Nut in the Cellar.

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        • #19
          I have had some time to get into the shop for extended periods of time and I’m finding it a challenge to make six drawers. This is my first time with soft close drawer slides and it takes a technique that I haven’t used before. The drawers are 26”x14”x7” which are also larger than I’ve ever done. I have also discovered that I under bought wood and have to go back to the “candy store” for more.
          Jim Frye
          The Nut in the Cellar.

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          • #20
            I have come to the conclusion that don’t have the wherewithal to do hand cut dovetails for all of these drawers. Honestly, I’ve taken so much time with this project, I don’t feel like dragging it out so much longer doing dovetails. I suppose this should be an excuse to buy a dovetail jig, but at 73 I think I’m done buying major tools. Please don’t hate me. I am going to do the corner joins with mating rabbits that will be cross pinned after they are glued up. It will also be a bit easier to custom size each drawer to fit between the slides. Due to my somewhat sloppy carcass build, there are slight differences in width. I have a bag of 5/32” bamboo skewers to use as pins or wooden nails. The drawer bottoms are 3/4” maple veneer ply let into the sides with rabbits and dados. Once the parts are glued up and pinned, the drawer is insanely ridged. The drawers will have separate fronts screwed to the front of drawers to hide the drawer slides. They will be raised panels with cock bead around each front.
            Last edited by Jim Frye; 03-16-2020, 10:43 PM.
            Jim Frye
            The Nut in the Cellar.

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            • #21
              I've never even bothered to try doing dovetails, so I'm not one to judge.

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              • #22
                Have you considered box joints? I like that they can be made in mass and make a extremely strong box. The downside to a box joint is how easy it is to mess up a batch, but after you get use to the setup they are quick and easy.

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                • #23
                  Hooray!! The hardwood store is back open for customers to visit. Ohio has finally started opening retail back up. I went and picked up some stock to finish making the drawers. Had to settle for hard maple as all of their soft maple stock was really narrow and the drawers are 7” deep. This project has stretched out so long, I just didn’t fell like doing a bunch of edge joining to build up to width. This table is going to come in close to 200 pounds by the time I get it done. Finding stock wider than 6 inches is getting more and more difficult.
                  Jim Frye
                  The Nut in the Cellar.

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