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Fall's Here, Project Time...

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  • Fall's Here, Project Time...

    We had our first frost last night and that means the yard work will soon be at an end. With the warm, wet weather we've had this summer and fall, there has been a lot of work out there. Plus the Grandkids sports (Baseball, Football, & Volleyball) are also ending. Yesterday, I went to the local hardwood dealer (aka The Woodworkers Candy Store) and picked out a bunch of Maple for new tables for the living room. I will be replacing some Chinese made Broyhill tables that we foolishly spent way too much money on. The tops and baseboards will be hard maple and the rest of the carcasses will be soft maple. The dealer carries"shorts" that are 4' to 6' long and are well suited for smaller projects. The shorts are about $0.30 a bd. ft. less than the regular 8' to 10' stuff. The shorts also fit nicely inside my Civic sedan as I still haven't bought roof racks for it to mount my old frame on. Anyway, the first item will be a coffee table with drawers and will be copied from this picture I found on-line. It will be 50" long, 30" wide and 21" tall. It will be dyed a walnut brown. SWMBO hasn't picked out the drawer pulls yet, but with the way I work, it will be a few months before they are needed. 6 hand dovetailed drawers will be time consuming enough.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	classic-12-drawer-coffee-table-110x70x50cm1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	71.7 KB ID:	835130
    Last edited by Jim Frye; 10-18-2018, 07:01 PM.
    Jim Frye
    The Nut in the Cellar.

  • #2
    Jim,

    That will be a nice project and I'm looking forward to your pictures.

    I haven't built anything (I should probably capitalize, that to reflect how I feel about it), in a couple of years now. It's quite depressing. Just can't find the time or I'm exhausted from everything else I've had do that week.

    Glad to see projects like this though, it gives me something to think about, and of course something to admire in others. Look forward to your progress.

    Thanks for the post,

    CWS
    Think it Through Before You Do!

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    • #3
      I understand. Summers are really busy for us and then school starts. It seems like we always have the Grandkids here and with summer yard work, there's little time to be in the shop. Fortunately, I like to design things to solve a problem, so some of my shop time is not actually working wood. I find my shop time to be really relaxing and it allows me to get away from all of hurly burly. I usually spend my shop time is small increments, maybe a half hour at a time. This is why it takes me so long to build a piece of furniture. Sometimes I will get wrapped up in what I'm doing and find the time has really flown. It may be as simple as clearing off the work bench and putting tools away. A couple of weeks ago, I was puttering around and picked up a scrap piece of plywood. Next thing I knew, I was thinking about how I could use a "tailgate" for the electric mower we recently bought. I wanted something I could strap a trash can on to use as a yard cart. I don't have room to store a trailer style cart to tow around, but the mower could haul a can around so I wouldn't need to get the big wheelbarrow out. Over the next couple of weeks, I went from an Idea, to a design, to a prototype (which broke on the first use due to poor material choice), to a second design that works as desired. It was made from stuff I had in the shop and it took several sessions before I found all the materials I needed. Was this woodworking? Maybe. The main part is made from wood, but more importantly, I spent quite a few relaxing and productive hours doing nothing important (to anyone else) and I have a new tool that will serve me for many years.
      Last edited by Jim Frye; 10-18-2018, 10:12 PM.
      Jim Frye
      The Nut in the Cellar.

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      • #4
        It's raining all day here, so I had no excuse to not spend time in the shop (3 hours). Today's effort was preparing the stock for the top of the table. I had picked 5 hard maple boards for the top. I first oriented the end grain so the bark side was up on alternate pieces. All edges were pencil marked for the adjoining edges. I crosscut them to rough length and ripped them to have a clean glue edge. I use a Freud Glue Rip blade for this. The stock I buy is S2S R1E, so I can do all of this on the BT3K. Starting with the center (and widest) board, I did a biscuit join to the next board. This is now sitting on my assembly table in clamps. I only do one join at a time as I find it's easier to get one joint aligned at a time. I will let the joint cure for 24 hours and proceed to the next board building outwards from the center on each side until all 5 boards are part of the top assembly. Since it will take me several months to build this table, this glue up will be clamped with cauls to help keep it flat until it's time for final cutting, routing and assembly.
        Jim Frye
        The Nut in the Cellar.

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        • #5
          Status Update: I finished making up the top blank for the coffee table. I told you I was slow. It measures 51"x31"x13/16". I will cut it to final size when it's time to rout the edges and assemble it to to casework. It weighs 30 pounds. Hard Maple isn't called Rock Maple sometimes for nothing I guess.
          Jim Frye
          The Nut in the Cellar.

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