New to me BT3100

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  • New to me BT3100

    I’ve been looking into picking up a used table saw for a bit, mostly since I’m just getting into woodworking and home DIY projects, figured a table saw would be a good compliment to my sliding miter and circular. Most of them seemed similar, saw this one that peaked my interest as it seemed more solid and it was nice to find this forum dedicated to it! So I’m going to give the manual a look over and try to figure it out more this weekend, I noticed the miter table doesn’t slide….is there a lock or something I have to click to get it to move? The guy said he wasn’t sure what he did with the blade guard and from what I see online, the riving knife is attached to that for this saw, so I figure I want to find a replacement for that, since the riving knife would help me feel better/safer as I learn working with the table saw. Also any obvious pieces that I’m missing? What should I use to scrub down the surface, it’s got some buildup on it from sitting in the guys garage, anything better to use or to avoid for cleaning? Also any obvious pieces that I’m missing?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    There is a lock on the smt. It’s a little black tab on the near side in the center of the table. Shark guard makes a riiving knife but I can’t seem to find the right one yet.my used and abused BT3000 didn’t come with one so I made a zero clearance blade insert with a splitter for now.
    welcome!

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah its right here where the arrow points. It has a little little finger lift to raise it from locking into the SMT tray base. If its stiff, you can lube it and loosen the screw holding the black lock.

      Watch out, you have the Miter fence set up so far to the right you risk cutting off the end.

      Welcome to the forum, enjoy your new saw, download the BT3 FAQ which is linked in my signature line here at the bottom of my post.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	BT SMT lock.png Views:	0 Size:	525.8 KB ID:	850016
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

      Comment


      • #4
        The Shark Guard system is a complete clear blade guard, riving knife, and anti-kickback pawls (optional) package. The originator is the late Lee Styron who was user "Stytooner" on this website; his family continues the business. See their website at Shark Guard Website. And use this webiste's search function to locate posts by Stytooner for information on the Shark Guard and many other safety related items.

        Read this entire thread: Tall rip fence ideas and a lot of discussion on blade guards, riving knives, and cutting small parts safely. It also has PDF plans for Lee's riving knife (part of the Shark Guard system) that he donated to this website years ago.

        edit: and read Loring's FAQ from his signature. That information should be included in a re-release of the Ryobi BT3 owner's manual.

        mpc
        Last edited by LCHIEN; 04-15-2022, 02:33 AM. Reason: corrected Lee Styron's user name

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mpc View Post
          The Shark Guard system is a complete clear blade guard, riving knife, and anti-kickback pawls (optional) package. The originator is the late Lee Styron who was user "Stytooner" on this website; his family continues the business. See their website at Shark Guard Website. And use this webiste's search function to locate posts by Stytooner for information on the Shark Guard and many other safety related items.

          Read this entire thread: Tall rip fence ideas and a lot of discussion on blade guards, riving knives, and cutting small parts safely. It also has PDF plans for Lee's riving knife (part of the Shark Guard system) that he donated to this website years ago.

          edit: and read Loring's FAQ from his signature. That information should be included in a re-release of the Ryobi BT3 owner's manual.

          mpc
          Unfortunately the riving knife and original shark guard which replaces the missing Ryobi part costs about $245 - while significantly improved over the OEM system, its a lot of money for a used saw.
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

          Comment


          • #6
            The OEM blade guards show up on eBay frequently, there are two there now. Prices are somewhat high, but much lower than a Shark Guard package. While the Shark Guard is awesome, I have one on my current Ridgid saw and on both of my shopsmiths, the OEM guard is also pretty good.

            Short of a SawStop, The Shark Guard is the best safety upgrade you can make.

            Chr's
            __________
            An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
            A moral man does it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have parts available Including a complete Shark Guard assembly or the OEM assembly. Reach out if you need anything.
              Harumpf!
              GrumpyDad

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post

                Unfortunately the riving knife and original shark guard which replaces the missing Ryobi part costs about $245 - while significantly improved over the OEM system, its a lot of money for a used saw.
                Yeah, I saw people recommending the shark guard and while it seems like a great system, it's tough to justify, since I got the saw for $80, paying triple the cost of the saw itself at this time would be tough, but hopefully I can work my way there! I will definitely read through the FAQ, it seems like a wealth of information there. I will be mindful of the fence when I actually set it up and go through the alignment process in the book.
                Anything I should use or not use to clean up the saw a bit?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MakeshiftDIYdad View Post

                  Yeah, I saw people recommending the shark guard and while it seems like a great system, it's tough to justify, since I got the saw for $80, paying triple the cost of the saw itself at this time would be tough, but hopefully I can work my way there! I will definitely read through the FAQ, it seems like a wealth of information there. I will be mindful of the fence when I actually set it up and go through the alignment process in the book.
                  Anything I should use or not use to clean up the saw a bit?
                  First thing is to avoid any silicone based sprays, lubes and waxes... the silicone will spread like and cause finish problems on any wood you use.

                  I would clean with mild soapy solution on damp cloth or even Fantastic type cleaners for most grime. Them coat all the Working surfaces with JOhnson's Paste Wax and polish for a protective coat. Dry lube the blade raising mechanisms - the screw and the sliding ways. I lube the sliding ways on my BT3000 with paste wax.

                  User Grumpy Dad replied to you he has some Roybi splitters and guards as well as a used SHark Guard - you might check him out.
                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post

                    Unfortunately the riving knife and original shark guard which replaces the missing Ryobi part costs about $245 - while significantly improved over the OEM system, its a lot of money for a used saw.
                    FA\ar less money than a single trip to the ER and possible loss of digit or worse.
                    just another brick in the wall...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Black walnut View Post

                      FA\ar less money than a single trip to the ER and possible loss of digit or worse.
                      That’s fair…..haha

                      also, does anyone use the router table part of this saw? I’ve never used a router either, but I was just installing some new doors the other night and apparently that would have made my life a lot easier for the hinge
                      Last edited by MakeshiftDIYdad; 04-16-2022, 08:19 AM.

                      Comment


                      • Black walnut

                        Black walnut
                        commented
                        Editing a comment
                        The router attachment is a useful feature as long as you understand and keep within its limitations. Absolutely critical if using is the locking bracket that holds the accessory table to the rails in the rear. If you are limited in space, mostly do small projects, on an occasional basis it makes sense. A stand alone router table or a router table insert plate set up in a shop made table extension are better options. Nearly every project I have done required some router table procedures. However it depends on you and your project list on how valuable a router table set up will be. IMHO a router in a table is nearly worthless for hinge installation on a door or a door frame. Both are best done with a handheld router , guide bushings and a template.

                    • #12
                      On the left side of the SMT, (when facing the saw) is a little black "stop" that you raise and lower depending on need. The stop is for the SMT miter fence to lock it into a perfect 90 with the blade. It is adjustable (with a flat blade screwdriver) through about 1/2 of, or 1 degree. Once adjusted the SMT and miter fence are properly adjusted, just place the miter fence on the table, raise the "stop" and your miter fence will be 90 to the blade.

                      See Page 34 of the manual for the "Quick Stop" in the bottom pict.
                      Last edited by leehljp; 04-16-2022, 08:53 AM.
                      Hank Lee

                      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I used the BT3 router table function for a while I kept a old router with a 45 bevel w/bearing and some roundover/bearing bits in it for doing edge treatments.
                        If you use the fence, you will have to be fighting/sharing the table saw with all the attachments and you have to lock down the router table to the rear rail because it will move under side forces.

                        I've since reverted to just doing my bearing guided edge finishing on my big router table. as well as the fence guided stuff. After I got a router lifter that made it much easier to set the height without reaching under the table and physically adjusting the router.
                        Last edited by LCHIEN; 04-16-2022, 10:58 AM.
                        Loring in Katy, TX USA
                        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                        Comment

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