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  • Cut hinge with saw?

    I made my monthly pilgrimage to Woodcraft and bought a piano hinge. Sales dude says cut it with my chop saw. I instinctively cover my personal space. My chop saw is a Ridgid with original blade. What say you?

  • #2
    I've only cut a few piano hinges in the past, but I've always just used a hack saw. Only takes a couple of minutes, not worth risking the damage to a MS blade - or worse.
    Bill

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    • #3
      I cut it with a dremel with a metal grinding wheel. Piano hinges are usually steel and plated with brass or nickel or whatever so i wouldn't use a miter saw on them.
      Chr's
      __________
      An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
      A moral man does it.

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      • #4
        5” side grinder with a thin metal cutting disk. Harbor freight has cheap grinders for $19. I’d be wary of cutting a floppy piano hinge with a chop saw. Clamp it between 2 pieces of sacrificial wood and cut it with a hack saw.

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        • #5
          Woodcraft has always impressed me by the special class of morons they have running the place.

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          • #6
            There are circular saw blades made for ferrous metal cutting. By companies like Freud. You can google ferrous metal cutting blade freud for example and get some links to these blades.

            Now I'm going to admit that I have not tried one, but that there appears to be blades engineered for just this purpose. I would say that if the bade can take it, then the saw itself should have no problem, in my opinion.

            https://www.diablotools.com/products/D1050CF
            Last edited by LCHIEN; 12-25-2019, 01:50 AM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
              There are circular saw blades made for ferrous metal cutting. By companies like Freud. You can google ferrous metal cutting blade freud for example and get some links to these blades.

              Now I'm going to admit that I have not tried one, but that there appears to be blades engineered for just this purpose. I would say that if the bade can take it, then the saw itself should have no problem, in my opinion.

              https://www.diablotools.com/products/D1050CF
              The description says to use with a dedicated low RPM saw. The max listed RPM for this blade is 3000. Most miter saws run at around 3450 RPM although the Festool Kapex is variable speed from 1400-3400 RPM
              Chr's
              __________
              An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
              A moral man does it.

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              • LCHIEN
                LCHIEN commented
                Editing a comment
                Good catch.

            • #8
              The benefit of the miter saw is that the cut will be square. The downside is blade wear, and the potential for a tooth grabbing the metal and grenading the saw like Loring's late Hitachi. We use a lot of piano hinges on yachts, and my preferred method is to cut it with a fine-tooth hack saw on the flat side when closed. I can get it square, that way, where cutting down from the hinge pin into the leaf will almost certainly result in a raggedy, angled cut. It may not seem like a big deal, until you open the leaves and it looks like this ">" on the end. I'll skip the finer points of cutting both ends to center the fastener holes or not having to cut through one
              After you've cut it, inspect the "barrel" of the hinge pin and see if there are dimples where the barrel has been center-punched into the pin. If not, consider setting the pin that way to keep it from creeping out. I've seen hinge pins that have crept out of vertical mountings by up to 4", and then kicked into a bend, waiting to draw blood in a largely barefoot environment.

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              • #9
                I wrote that it would not be a good idea to cut on a miter saw because the piano hinge is flimsy and may wind up tearing the hinge up and slinging all over the shop. I wouldn’t want to cut it on my favorite blade but it will probably work just fine with any woodworking blade. If I had to do it on a miter saw I would also sandwich it between 2 pieces of wood and clamp it like I was mad at it. I use a metal cutting blade in my Skil circular saw that is rated at 5800 rpm no load, and the blade is marked for 5800 rpm as well. I have cut from 27 ga roofing metal all the way to 1/2” steel on a truck trailer hitch.

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