Simple DIY shop made items for use in the shop. What have you made? Part II

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Simple DIY shop made items for use in the shop. What have you made? Part II

    This is a continuation of a post thread from a couple of years ago
    https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/discussions/shop-setup-layout-and-design/826693-simple-shop-made-items-for-use-in-the-shop-what-have-you-made/page1
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

  • #2
    Vertical angle drilling jig

    This is useful for a drilled vertical member and wanting all the pegs inserted with a small upwards angle for hanging things.

    You would slide the workpiece across your drill press table against a fence. Many drill presses have tilting tables,
    but I keep mine perfectly perpendicular to the drill bit and don't like to mess with the heavy table. and then have to reset it to perfect zero.

    So instead I made a tilting jig.
    I could have made it adjustable for universal work but I made it for 15, a commonly used angle.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_002835_resized.jpg Views:	431 Size:	101.4 KB ID:	840476
    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_002822_resized.jpg Views:	422 Size:	132.4 KB ID:	840477
    With its own fence I have worked on some 6-foot boards.

    Example:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20200821_182345editsm.jpg
Views:	295
Size:	63.4 KB
ID:	845377
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-14-2021, 10:21 PM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • #3
      Horizontal angle drilling jig

      Sometimes you need a horizontal row of holes that tilt upwards. This is the opposite direction of the Vertical angle jig posted above.
      This good for like, a horizontal coat hanging rack on the wall where you want to tilt the pegs up 15 degrees to keep the coat from sliding off..

      You cannot tilt the table for this operation at all on my drill press as it only tilts side to side. Turning the work 90 means long pieces run into the column. So you need a different jig.

      I made this one adjustable as you can see by the slotted holes in the back and some screws that can be loosened and move the back
      piece of wood up and down to change the angle. This one is set to about 10 degrees right now.
      It has a fence on the front to keep the holes in a perfect row.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_002531_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	110.9 KB ID:	840479Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_002540_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	95.7 KB ID:	840480
      Last edited by LCHIEN; 04-20-2021, 04:05 PM.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

      Comment


      • #4
        Retaining Small cut off on miter saw

        This is more of a tip than a jig, unless you call a 5-inch piece of masking tape a jig... Why not?

        When I have a series of small dowels to be used as pegs, I find cutting 2" pegs or so usually go flying after the miter saw (mine a 12" Hitachi) cuts through and they go quite a ways because its small and lightweight. I think the cut ends dips into the slot in the blade clearance plate and catches the saw blade and flies. Especially when the other end is butted against a stop block the small cut off is trapped between the stop block and the blade. It is worse when I try and cut four or five at a time next to each other.

        The solution I have found helps a lot is take a 5-inch piece of masking tape and after placing the dowels against the stop block I tape from the fence across the multiple dowel cut-offs to be and then continue to tape the end of the tape to the table. Worsk for one or more, as many as you want.

        Now when I make the cut the dowels still jump a bit but one end of the tape usually stays stuck with all the dowels attached. Its then a simple deal to peel the cut-offs and bag them and then reuse the tape on the next set of 4 or 5.

        My previous method was to go to a manual miter box and back saw and do one at a time, a rather laborious task.

        Now what I need is to find a nice way to chamfer the ends of those cut off pegs.

        Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_084534_resized.jpg Views:	76 Size:	97.8 KB ID:	840486
        Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-17-2021, 11:33 PM.
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment


        • #5
          Vertical Keyhole Routing Jig

          This concerns using Keyhole bits as described here: https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...ole-router-bit

          The Keyhole jigs are often used for horizontal slots to mount picture frames etc. where you route the keyhole to one side of center and use a fence to cut the slot across center. THis allows you to exactly level a picture by sliding the hanging screw sideways in the slot until the picture is balanced.

          I wanted to use it the other way... to route two short vertical slots to drop over two properly spaced and leveled screwheads to make a level picture mounting.

          I fussed over this for a few days since its not easy to slide along a fence like the horizontal slot method.

          They have to be perfectly placed in both directions or the picture won't mount level.

          I came up with this jig for my Bosch Colt router (palm router or detail router)

          Here's the jig before and after routing. The hex nut at the top is a stop so I can adjust the length of the slot.
          Two thin rails on the fastened to the bottom of the jig are to aid in alignment; either can be removed for wider pieces.
          The cutout on the bottom is to pass the knob on the Colt router base.
          The side boards are wide enough to clamp to the work piece.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_092142_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	113.9 KB ID:	840492Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_092210_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	113.2 KB ID:	840491

          Here's the router. Basically you hold it in the jig slot just above the workpiece, start the router, drop it for the
          plunge cut and slide it forward to the stop. Then back it up, turn it off and remove when it stops spinning.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_092021_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	87.6 KB ID:	840493Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_092225_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	82.1 KB ID:	840490

          Perfectly located keyhole slots.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	20200830_094442_resized.jpg Views:	0 Size:	61.0 KB ID:	840489
          Attached Files
          Last edited by LCHIEN; 06-28-2022, 10:22 AM.
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

          Comment


          • dbhost

            dbhost
            commented
            Editing a comment
            Interesting. I am wondering if such a thing could...
            A. Work with a full size router.
            B. Be worth the storage space for working with a full size router.

            Simply put, I don't have a trim / palm router, but honestly I need to be able to cut keyholes...

          • LCHIEN
            LCHIEN commented
            Editing a comment
            No reason it won't work with full size router... jig will be larger and router a little harder to use. If it has a round base the rectangle opening will be as wide as the base plus a hair and as tall as the base is wide plus the length of the throw... and still use an adjustable stop to set the actual throw.

            As for worth it, there's no other easy way to get the vertical slots in a horizontal bar consistently. I puzzled over it for a long time. You want them, its worth it.
            Last edited by LCHIEN; 06-28-2022, 10:24 AM.

        • #6
          Dowel End Chamfer Jig

          I haven't made this yet but I think I will

          https://youtu.be/2Ms0P0bXJnk

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Dowel Chanfer jig.JPG
Views:	684
Size:	45.2 KB
ID:	840513
          Last edited by LCHIEN; 08-31-2020, 04:56 PM.
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

          Comment


          • #7
            So I got around to making the dowel bevel jig listed above.

            Mine looks like this.
            Click image for larger version  Name:	dowel bevel jig crop sm.jpg Views:	0 Size:	225.6 KB ID:	840876

            Click image for larger version  Name:	dowel bevel jog 2 crop sm.jpg Views:	0 Size:	225.1 KB ID:	840877
            It has two slots, one for larger dowels and one for smaller dowels. I lubricated the v-groove slots with Johnsons paste wax (JPW) to make it easy to roll the dowel by hand.
            The little metal stops were the hard part. I started out using the washer alone but its radius ends up too close to the bevel and the dowel then moves as you cut the bevel. So a square stop that blocks the dowel close to the center is needed for a stop. Made the hole in the stop a little oversize to allow some positioning so that's why the washer is still there.

            For size reference that is a 1/2" V-groove router bit I used and the dowel is a 1/2" dowel. Belt sander is 1" x 24". I am pretty sure this would work on the 6" disk sander I have, as well, or even the oscillating spindle sander would work.

            Works pretty well, I can now make perfect, consistent and repeatable bevels on even short pieces of dowel.
            Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-02-2020, 01:12 AM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

            Comment


            • #8
              Wow, lovely thread that I missed before!

              I will need that odd-angle mitre clamp soon; need to make it asap!
              It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
              - Aristotle

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by radhak View Post
                Wow, lovely thread that I missed before!

                I will need that odd-angle mitre clamp soon; need to make it asap!
                Here's a sketch/instructions of a way to make them 2 at a time. Hope that helps: Odd Angle miter clamp.pdf



                Click image for larger version  Name:	20201002_115348 crop.jpg Views:	0 Size:	167.9 KB ID:	840884

                Click image for larger version  Name:	PA020003.JPG Views:	0 Size:	134.2 KB ID:	840885
                Attached Files
                Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-02-2020, 12:07 PM.
                Loring in Katy, TX USA
                If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                Comment


                • #10
                  Well, not totally simple and not totally finished but my spindle rest for my lathe:

                  I have two DC systems, one in the un-air conditioned side and one inside. The inside one is being re-located and I have all kinds of fittings and lots of 4 inch water/sewer pipe. Unfortunately none of the fittings fit precisely with the 4 inch sewer pipe. So, I am making a spindle rest to support the pipe to turn the ends for precise sizing to the other 4 inch fittings. It is very doable simply because of the thickness of the sewer pipe.

                  ANYWAY, it has been fun and enjoyable making the support. I will use if for more than just the pipe sizing for fittings. Looking forward to making some larger bowls and vases and using the support for neck support on some vases.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Spindle support.jpg
Views:	604
Size:	180.7 KB
ID:	840890

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Spindle support.jpg
Views:	566
Size:	180.7 KB
ID:	840889
                  Hank Lee

                  Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    That's quite a labor of love, hank.
                    And those darn PVC shavings - the static makes them cling to everything!
                    Loring in Katy, TX USA
                    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I got it built, works . . . so so! Two mistakes on it even though it is built fairy well and precise.

                      First - My Grizzly is the G0462 which is VS with the Reeves drive and that means it only goes down to 600 RPM. I put the 4 inch pipe (1/4 in thick walls about 42 inches long in it and the weight was substantial. With the slowest speed being 600 rpm, it had some vibration. Too much. I may can adjust it out with some playing with the location of the support on the bed.

                      The second problems was that I located the three roller and arms equi-distant/angles. I have noticed that some designs locate the bottom two rollers closer together rather than being equidistant. I think the purpose of the bottom two closer together - is to support the weight better and then the top is to keep the object on the two bottom ones. I learned that the hard way. After trying mine 3 different times, It dawned on me the purpose. The main thing is to support the weight in line with the center point. The top roller just keeps the object steady on the bottom two weight supporting rollers. - at least that is what I am thinking at this time; might change it later.

                      I will get used to it, but it is fairly delicate adjusting the arms and rollers for precise support. I need to re-think that part and add something to allow micro adjustments.

                      I am going to tweak it a little and see what happens. It does look nice like some I see on different sites!
                      Last edited by leehljp; 10-03-2020, 09:54 PM.
                      Hank Lee

                      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Hank Lee, I would think the hard thing on a support like that is getting it concentric with the lathe axis. Otherwise you will be dealing with a big wobble.

                        Maybe the way is to set the bottom two rollers closer as you suggest. Make the lathe bed dead level. And then load the item and before tightening the lathe chuck make the item dead level using the two bottom rollers. Then tighten the chuck and the third roller.

                        Note: putting the bottom rollers closer together (angular-wise) looks to be easy but will decrease the minimum diameter objects you can support. Maybe you should put multiple sets of mounting holes to be able to vary the angle between them. Say every ten degrees.
                        Now they are 120 degrees apart; mountings for 100, 80, 60 degrees.

                        Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-04-2020, 04:46 PM.
                        Loring in Katy, TX USA
                        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Different mounting holes - Thought of it and probably will down the road. But I figured out my problem for now - I have a free spinning tail stock chuck adapter somewhere. If I put a chuck on the tail stock, I can support the tail end and then use the steady rest to get the wobble out.

                          BTW, I am working on a micro adjuster for each spoke. That should help considerably.

                          I should be making a very small steady rest for bowl finials. I might do that down the road also
                          Hank Lee

                          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post

                            Here's a sketch/instructions of a way to make them 2 at a time. Hope that helps: Odd Angle miter clamp.pdf



                            Click image for larger version Name:	20201002_115348 crop.jpg Views:	0 Size:	167.9 KB ID:	840884

                            Click image for larger version Name:	PA020003.JPG Views:	0 Size:	134.2 KB ID:	840885

                            Thanks, Loring, the sketch/instructions make it crystal clear!
                            It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
                            - Aristotle

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X