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Texas Freeze, broken pipe valve

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  • Texas Freeze, broken pipe valve

    Well, I found a hidden damage from the big Texas Freeze in February.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	split valve.jpg Views:	10 Size:	102.5 KB ID:	843920

    This ball valve brass body split from the freezing weather, Funny thing is it only leaks when the valve is being turned from off to on or back. When the ball is approx 45 degrees, it is open to both the pressure and to the crack in the side and sprays out about 6 feet. I found it when I first used the sprinkler after the storm, but since it apparently did not seem to leak when full on or full off and it was completely covered by insulation I did not dig it out until today. I drained the expensive vacuum breaker above for the freeze having lost two of them at $35 to prior freezes and insulated the whole exposed pipes and fittings. Saved the vacuum breaker but lost this valve.
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 04-26-2021, 10:20 PM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

  • #2
    Every fall we have people come blow all the water out of the system with a giant truck mounted compressor so we never have frozen pipes. Then in the spring we just need to replace the heads (and sod) near the driveway and sidewalks where the snow plows have gone wild and torn them out. I haven't started my system this spring and i only know of one lost head so far.

    Minnesota winters take their toll every year. We should try harder to keep them to ourselves in he future.
    Chr's
    __________
    An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
    A moral man does it.

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    • #3
      OK how do i fix it? (the broken valve at the right running vertically)
      Click image for larger version  Name:	P4260358.JPG Views:	0 Size:	152.2 KB ID:	843932

      I think I have to cut the vertical inlet line. Then unscrew the valve from the vacuum breaker above.
      Then replace the valve and screw into the vac breaker. Make up a short length of pipe with a threaded pipe fitting and screw into the valve.
      Finally cement a F-F coupling to connect the new pipe to what's left sticking out of the ground.

      Or is it better to get a compression fitting to use the old cutoff piece and connect it back to the pipe sticking out of the ground?
      I think I've heard that compression fittings were less reliable over time but I also hate making cemented joints where you can't twist the pipe a little when joining.


      Last edited by LCHIEN; 04-27-2021, 12:56 AM.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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      • #4
        Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
        OK how do i fix it?
        Or is it better to get a compression fitting to use the old cutoff piece and connect it back to the pipe sticking out of the ground?
        I think I've heard that compression fittings were less reliable over time but I also hate making cemented joints where you can't twist the pipe a little when joining.

        Back when I lived in Arizona I installed the sprinklers with a compression fitting where it connected to the house hose spigot. Woke up one Saturday morning to board a plane and heard running water, the compression fitting had pushed off the pipe. I don't recommend compression fittings for applications exposed to water pressure.

        Your first approach seems best. If you don't like making the cement joint, you could install a union so that you are tightening a nut to make the seal.

        --------------------------------------------------
        Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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        • #5
          JB Weld!!

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