dust cowl screw size (bt3000)

Collapse
X
 
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • 1o1
    Forum Newbie
    • Sep 2023
    • 9

    dust cowl screw size (bt3000)

    The cowl was removed and left off at some point, the screws became lost.

    I believe they are some type of fine thread machine screws. I see several types that will work. I just need the exact size.

    I am over hauling and replacing rearranging 90% of the upper deck and a bunch of other stuff on a BT3000. It will function with a mitre slide opposed to the original sled set up. I always preferred using a miter set up and thats what I'm used to.

    The dust collection process will be completely visible, and the side a hinged clear acrylic door to access blade changes. And basically lots of hardwood and steel bracing to stiffen it up. And a few things I'm probably forgetting. I will just show you what I mean when Its finished. Please get back to me on those shroud screws, thankyou.

    Attached Files
  • LCHIEN
    Internet Fact Checker
    • Dec 2002
    • 21218
    • Katy, TX, USA.
    • BT3000 vintage 1999

    #2
    Hi, welcome

    I presume you are referring to the dust cover or shroud #12 as its sometimes called that covers the side of the blade.

    According to the manual parts callout it uses a number of #10 x 1/2" pan head screws #75 which I presume indicates they are sheet metal screws, not machine screws.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	image.png Views:	0 Size:	96.3 KB ID:	856151

    Ask if you need more information or the manual.
    My FAQ on the BT3s is linked in my tag line.​
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-14-2023, 04:15 AM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment

    • 1o1
      Forum Newbie
      • Sep 2023
      • 9

      #3
      They reminded me of machine screws, like the ones that hold the blade plate only they are non tapered. its been a while since I seen them. We are securing sheet metal to casting. Not sheet to sheet.

      They go directly in to the cast metal which is finely threaded. To secure the cover, cowl, tomato tomato. Sheetmetal screws would make a mess of them until they wouldn't keep any screw. And require re-tapping to put them threads back in order.

      Comment

      • LCHIEN
        Internet Fact Checker
        • Dec 2002
        • 21218
        • Katy, TX, USA.
        • BT3000 vintage 1999

        #4
        Well this is the parts list from Ryobi. Machine screws are all listed by the diameter and thread pitch, i.e. #47 Screw (10-24 x 5/8" Pan Hd)
        so #75 Screw (10 x 1/2 Pan Hd) is not a "machine screw" by the normal definition.

        Click image for larger version  Name:	BT3000 Parts callout by name.jpg Views:	0 Size:	100.7 KB ID:	856155
        as for tomato, tomato,
        it is easier if we all stick to the names that the manufacturer put in his parts list. then there his no confusion. TBH, I was not certain to what part you were referring to at first. And it helps when searching the archives for solutions that other people have discussed/solved before. Using the wrong name may miss an existing solution.
        Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-14-2023, 09:40 PM.
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment

        • Black walnut
          Administrator
          • Aug 2015
          • 5464
          • BT3K

          #5
          Ryobi used a self-threading triangular screw in these places. I am going to assume that the thread pitch matches a sheet metal screw since no pitch is given. If they had used a self tapping(swaging) machine screw the size would be listed as 10-24 x1/2" Pan Hd. or whatever the thread pitch is. If you don't have the OEM screws you could probably drill out the holes and tap to 12-24 and use hardware store fasteners.
          just another brick in the wall...

          Boycott McAfee. They placed an unresponsive popup on my pc.

          Comment

          • LCHIEN
            Internet Fact Checker
            • Dec 2002
            • 21218
            • Katy, TX, USA.
            • BT3000 vintage 1999

            #6
            I'm pretty sure the aluminum castings would take ok to any self tapping no 10 screws and remake the threads. Its not like they holding any substantial force with the threads, just the sheet metal cover.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

            Comment

            • d_meister
              Established Member
              • Feb 2009
              • 215
              • La Conner, WA.
              • BT3000

              #7
              Assuming it's the assembly 1of1 is interested in; I happen to have a spare. The screws are indeed triangular and self tapping, but the thread it makes and the screw itself is 10-24.

              Comment


              • LCHIEN
                LCHIEN commented
                Editing a comment
                Since the holes are then 10-24, replacement screws, ordinary 10-24 pan head, will work fine since the holes were tapped by the initial assembly.
            • capncarl
              Veteran Member
              • Jan 2007
              • 3580
              • Leesburg Georgia USA
              • SawStop CTS

              #8
              Is this an application where you might install threaded rivets, riv-nuts or whatever you might call them, into the saw body? Then you install you whatever screw to match your rivet nut from the inside, making it a stud where you can attach your cowl with wing nuts or knobs. Making it easier means it might get removed and cleaned more often.

              Comment

              • LCHIEN
                Internet Fact Checker
                • Dec 2002
                • 21218
                • Katy, TX, USA.
                • BT3000 vintage 1999

                #9
                If you wanted you could get some 10-24 all thread and cut it into 3/4 or one inch lengths or cut off some longer 10-24 screws, and lock-tite the stud into the existing holes making fixed studs but that seems like a lot of work.

                Finding some precut studs is also possible but probably hard to find.

                I keep a dust collector on the port on the back of the saw and haven't ever had my dust cover off in 20 years.

                A search for 10-24 x 1" studs shows they are available.- but screws would be a lot easier to get.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	image.png Views:	0 Size:	137.2 KB ID:	856194
                Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-16-2023, 09:10 PM.
                Loring in Katy, TX USA
                If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                Comment

                • LCHIEN
                  Internet Fact Checker
                  • Dec 2002
                  • 21218
                  • Katy, TX, USA.
                  • BT3000 vintage 1999

                  #10
                  You could use these

                  https://www.amazon.com/10-24x5-POINT...rds=set+screw+ 10-24&qid=1694916729&sprefix=set+screw+10%2Caps%2C15 6 &sr=8-16
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	image.png
Views:	122
Size:	48.1 KB
ID:	856196
                  ​100 for $10.
                  can be threaded halfway into the locker bracket and held with a dab of loctite blue which would allow removing them later if desired.
                  Then you can use wing nuts to fasten the dust cover,

                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                  Comment


                  • capncarl
                    capncarl commented
                    Editing a comment
                    If it’s thick enough to perminately sink a stud why not just thread the hole an attach with a flat head screw or a bolt?

                  • LCHIEN
                    LCHIEN commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Holes are already threaded by the original ( no lost) self tapping 10-24 screws used

                    The OP wanted studs so he could drop the dust cover onto them easily and use wing nuts to attach, making it easy to remove and replace for cleaning
                    Easier to set it on, what, 5-6 studs instead of holding it in place and having to start several screws alignment, I suppose.
                • capncarl
                  Veteran Member
                  • Jan 2007
                  • 3580
                  • Leesburg Georgia USA
                  • SawStop CTS

                  #11
                  Dude…. This is a chance to buy more tools!
                  RivNuts open up a whole new horizon of fastener opportunities! I use them on all kind of jigs to attach a variety of clamps, and instead of having to install t track I pop in a riv nut and slot the fence, Guide or whatever and tighten it with a wing nut, knob or ratchet handle thingys. Any access panel is attached using riv nuts and a stud with a bolt or knob. Riv nuts won’t hold in sheet rock. Kitchen appliances with their tin foil thick metal bodies are known for stripping out the sheet metal screw holes, pop in a riv nut and put it back together with a machine screw. Their design attachment thickness do vary, and are designed for the threaded part to remain on the backside of the hole.

                  Comment

                  • d_meister
                    Established Member
                    • Feb 2009
                    • 215
                    • La Conner, WA.
                    • BT3000

                    #12
                    The concern that the screw holes will wear excessively over time is unwarranted, in my opinion. As Loring notes, he's not taken his off, and neither have I. There's just no need, usually. The space inside is accessible from the top of the saw, or through the dust port. A long handled magnet will retrieve that arbor nut and washers . Besides, the casting alloy is rather robust. Just think of how many time we've all removed and re-installed the screws that hold the throat plate to change blades and throat plates. A regular 10-24 would work fine in place of the triangular assembly screws, without re-tapping.

                    Comment

                    • capncarl
                      Veteran Member
                      • Jan 2007
                      • 3580
                      • Leesburg Georgia USA
                      • SawStop CTS

                      #13
                      Has anyone suggested just cleaning up the mating surfaces and put Velcro on the 2 pieces?

                      Comment

                      Working...