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  • Extended stop block

    I had a bit of aggravation recently trying to cut a bunch of shelves to the same length by measuring each one and cutting. There has to be a better way. So I came up with this. It worked so well that I’m going to make another out of some hard wood. Any thoughts on how to make it better?
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  • #2
    Should work fine as long as the stop is firmly locked so it doesn't move. If it works for you, then it should be just fine. I made a stop block that attaches to either the rip fence or the SMT fence depending on the length of the cutoff. I use it in conjunction sometimes with the wide crosscut fence I made for the SMT also.

    https://www.sawdustzone.org/articles...truction-notes

    https://www.sawdustzone.org/articles...for-the-bt3000

    Last edited by Jim Frye; 02-13-2021, 03:25 PM.
    Jim Frye
    The Nut in the Cellar.
    ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jim Frye View Post
      Should work fine as long as the stop is firmly locked so it doesn't move. If it works for you, then it should be just fine. I made a stop block that attaches to either the rip fence or the SMT fence depending on the length of the cutoff. I use it in conjunction sometimes with the wide crosscut fence I made for the SMT also.

      https://www.sawdustzone.org/articles...truction-notes

      https://www.sawdustzone.org/articles...for-the-bt3000
      **** nice! I’ll keep that in mind when it comes to tuning up my secondary bt3000

      Comment


      • #4
        I made a great stop block for my RAS fence a few years ago. It's just about perfect for my use on that tool. Of course an RAS is a completely different tool, perhaps perfect for cross cuts; but, looking at your back stop made for a cross-cut sled on a table saw, I imagined my design being applied to that.

        That would entail putting a T-channel across the top of your back-stop fence and applying a measuring tape to the channel. The stop employs a sliding block with an indicator (made from a scrap piece of clear past on which I scribed a line with a razer knife) against the measuring tape and a T-bolt with a locking know riding in that T-channel and thus adjustable and lockable across the back-stop. The actual stop is simply another block (I used 3/4 x 3/4) which is screwed to the indicator block (on that side of the RAS, it has to reach under the motor to reach the blade)

        Advantage for my application is that I don't have to use a retractable tape measure or other solid ruler to measure and then mark. I simply adjust the sliding block to the right measurement, lock it in place, position my stock against the adjustable stop, and then feed the cut. Simple and I can cut one piece or any other quantity.

        Now imagine my fixed RAS fence as being the back-stop fence you are using on your sled. Mount the T-track channel on either the right or left of that and then I think that I could use exactly the same adjustable block and simply cut it to have it accurate. Only challenge of course is my fence is a bit longer than yours and as such I can cut about a four-ft length and I can make it longer give the room. For yours, it has to be able to sllide, but I think you'll get the idea.

        The beauty is that to ensure the accuracy you simply position the stop on zero, and cut a new stop should the one I have show any shrinkage. With the table saw, you would simply position your back-stop fence so it is over the blade and adjust your moveable stop accordingly. Of course you wouldn't have to use a longer stop like I did, because you're not reaching under the motor. Just make the add the T-channel along whatever side of your fence you wish, make the sliding measuring block and attach a short replaceable block. Once you have that together, apply the measuring tape, move the block so it aligns with zero, and then cut the replaceable block.

        Here are a couple of pictures: Click image for larger version  Name:	Dscn2397.jpg Views:	0 Size:	149.2 KB ID:	842926 Click image for larger version  Name:	Dscn2400.jpg Views:	0 Size:	139.5 KB ID:	842925 Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCN2392.JPG Views:	0 Size:	126.4 KB ID:	842928 Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCN2393.JPG Views:	0 Size:	106.3 KB ID:	842929 Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCN2394.JPG Views:	0 Size:	161.6 KB ID:	842927


        I hope this helps,

        CWS
        Last edited by cwsmith; 02-13-2021, 09:04 PM.
        Think it Through Before You Do!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cwsmith View Post
          I made a great stop block for my RAS fence a few years ago. It's just about perfect for my use on that tool. Of course an RAS is a completely different tool, perhaps perfect for cross cuts; but, looking at your back stop made for a cross-cut sled on a table saw, I imagined my design being applied to that.

          That would entail putting a T-channel across the top of your back-stop fence and applying a measuring tape to the channel. The stop employs a sliding block with an indicator (made from a scrap piece of clear past on which I scribed a line with a razer knife) against the measuring tape and a T-bolt with a locking know riding in that T-channel and thus adjustable and lockable across the back-stop. The actual stop is simply another block (I used 3/4 x 3/4) which is screwed to the indicator block (on that side of the RAS, it has to reach under the motor to reach the blade)

          Advantage for my application is that I don't have to use a retractable tape measure or other solid ruler to measure and then mark. I simply adjust the sliding block to the right measurement, lock it in place, position my stock against the adjustable stop, and then feed the cut. Simple and I can cut one piece or any other quantity.

          Now imagine my fixed RAS fence as being the back-stop fence you are using on your sled. Mount the T-track channel on either the right or left of that and then I think that I could use exactly the same adjustable block and simply cut it to have it accurate. Only challenge of course is my fence is a bit longer than yours and as such I can cut about a four-ft length and I can make it longer give the room. For yours, it has to be able to sllide, but I think you'll get the idea.

          The beauty is that to ensure the accuracy you simply position the stop on zero, and cut a new stop should the one I have show any shrinkage. With the table saw, you would simply position your back-stop fence so it is over the blade and adjust your moveable stop accordingly. Of course you wouldn't have to use a longer stop like I did, because you're not reaching under the motor. Just make the add the T-channel along whatever side of your fence you wish, make the sliding measuring block and attach a short replaceable block. Once you have that together, apply the measuring tape, move the block so it aligns with zero, and then cut the replaceable block.

          Here are a couple of pictures: Click image for larger version Name:	Dscn2397.jpg Views:	0 Size:	149.2 KB ID:	842926 Click image for larger version Name:	Dscn2400.jpg Views:	0 Size:	139.5 KB ID:	842925 Click image for larger version Name:	DSCN2392.JPG Views:	0 Size:	126.4 KB ID:	842928 Click image for larger version Name:	DSCN2393.JPG Views:	0 Size:	106.3 KB ID:	842929 Click image for larger version Name:	DSCN2394.JPG Views:	0 Size:	161.6 KB ID:	842927


          I hope this helps,

          CWS
          If I ever dig my ras out,I have a lot of tuning and accessories to add.

          Comment


          • #6
            Mostly I use the 12" compound miter saw for long cross cuts and have all kinds of stops on mine for long and short repetitive cuts.
            But that is a valid technique. I use similar for repetitive dado cross cuts and partial cuts on the BT3. Consider a fence clamp for attaching stuff to the miter fence. See product reviews.
            Last edited by LCHIEN; 02-14-2021, 01:11 AM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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