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Fuse replacement guide

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  • Fuse replacement guide

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    I have no comments other than don't try this at home.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

  • #2
    LOL!!! I love the slow blow fuses!

    And, I have seen and read of some strange "replacements".
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by leehljp View Post
      LOL!!! I love the slow blow fuses!

      And, I have seen and read of some strange "replacements".
      I don't know. Does it have to be 11 mm and chome vanadium? Will 10 mm or 7/16 SAE do? Can I use polished or does it have to be unpolished?
      So many questions. I guess I have just try it.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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      • #4
        Ah, the 250 amp. one brings back memories from my college days. My dorm roommate drove an old (for 1967) Skoda that had no keys and he used folded up gum wrappers to start it. Foil also served as fuses for the thing. Czechoslovakian fuses were a tad hard to come by in Ohio. Never doubt the ingenuity of an Engineering student.
        Jim Frye
        The Nut in the Cellar.

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        • #5
          I guess a safety fuse would be a black cat firecracker wrapped in tinfoil If it gets too hot the firecracker pops and breaks the connection. Sounds like a plan.

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          • #6
            Too funny!

            Reminds me of the project I brought home from junior high shop class back in 1957.... the electric hot dog cooker: Take a board, cut to about eight or so inches square. Draw two lines about an inch and a half from opposite edges of the board, divide those lines so you have four equally spaced marks, about one-inch in from the edge and 1-1/2 inches apart. Take eight nails, pound through the board at each mark so you now have two rows of nails. Leave the heads stand off an 8th of an inch or so and on the opposite side. On the nail head side of the board, make four legs (stand-offs) our of 3/4 dowel and glue them to the board at the corners. Then take about three or four foot of electric 'Zip" cord, split the wires for about a foot, and with insulation removed at the appropriate places, wrap the bare copper around each of the four nails in the first row. Do the same with the second strip on the second row. The electric hot dog cooker is now complete and ready to use!

            Just place a hot dog between each of the facing nail points.... when complete, plug in to your Mother's kitchen outlet and remove the plug when the hot dogs are done.

            ONLY PROBLEM.... don't touch the nails and don't use aluminum foil to catch the fluids!!!!!

            Fortunately, I did the latter (reasoning as a 13 yr old, that I didn't want to stain my board) on my first usage. One helluva FLASH !. When my Dad came home, he was not the least bit impressed with either my stupidity or my shop teacher's intelligence. As I recall he immediately called the Principle.

            Two things I learned that day was a basic danger with electricity... and I heard a couple of new words that I shouldn't add to my vocabulary!

            CWS
            Last edited by cwsmith; 12-29-2018, 09:09 PM.
            Think it Through Before You Do!

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            • #7
              During my earlier years it was fairly common to see tinfoil used as replacement fuses In British autos. Looking back at how unreliable the electrical system was I now understand.

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              • #8
                Has anybody found a 'creative fuse replacement' in a fuse box? I was helping with an electrical problem in an older building some years back. Opened the fuse panel door and found a cherry red glowing piece of metal in place of a fuse. Can't recall exactly what the 'replacement' fuse was, but it was glowing brightly.

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                • #9
                  That glowing red ďfuse replacement was probably a piece of 1/8Ē or 1/4Ē pipe, canít remember which fits what fuse holder! Donít ask how I know. old timers with 220v welding machines that were connected to fuse type boxes did it a lot because the 30 or 50 amp fuses would constantly blow. I donít ever recall hearing of someone ever burning up their welder this way.

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                  • #10
                    Hey, I'm reloading a bunch of the 350 amp fuses today so we can go shooting tomorrow.

                    I used to own a Triumph with an electrical system that didn't actually go through fuses. It would have a dash fire about weekly, but keep running.

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