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Another Tool Friend Gone...

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  • Another Tool Friend Gone...

    In 1974, we bought our first home and I bought a fertilizer spreader to help grow the new lawn. It was a Scott's Precision Control drop spreader and it's been pushed over three different yards for the last 44 years. The other day, it wasn't dispensing the granules properly and it turned out the "precision control" slots in the bottom of the hopper had corroded so badly that the tool had become useless. There was no way to adequately clean them and all the mechanism did was grind the fertilizer granules into a paste in the bottom of the machine. I stripped it down and my Son took it to the scrap iron bin at his work place. The replacement spreader is a $60 plastic job, also from Scott's. It does work nicely, pushes much easier, covers the lawn quicker, and cleans up nicely, but it remains to be seen if it will last. The strange thing is that better models (i.e. steel construction with pneumatic tires) are priced in the hundreds of dollars.
    Jim Frye
    The Nut in the Cellar.

  • #2
    From my father's gardening/outdoor tools, I still have a couple left.
    One is a wheelbarrow that I have to confess I've left outside for the last 25 years. I'm sure he had it at the house we had in the 50's-1960.; that's my earliest recollection of it - It's possible that the barrow goes back to 1954 when we moved into that house and I was 2.
    I recently (4 years?) ago had to replace the wheel as the bearing froze up buti ts still going quite strong. There's very little rust on the galvanized bed.Click image for larger version  Name:	wheelbarrow.jpg Views:	1 Size:	179.9 KB ID:	833701

    I also have a 6 foot wooden folding ladder and a 8 foot aluminum folding ladder from about the same era.

    I have a few hand tools but they've been stored indoors. Yankee screwdriver, Millers Falls brace.
    .
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

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    • #3
      I was recently re-arranging a storage cabinet in my shop and came across my stash of old tools that I seldom use. One was a 1/2” Milwaukee drill that I purchased in the mid 70s. I have several newer drills that I prefer to use so I wiped it off and decided to give it to my neighbors boys that is just settig up his house...... and I noticed that i had stamped my social security number in several places in the aluminum castings. This was done before anyone ever thought about stealing social security numbers, as a way of identifying the tool if it was stolen. I pulled out the rest of the tool stash and found that I had stamped my social in the porta band, mag drill and several other aluminum housing tools. I don’t think I’ll be giving these tools away but I will grid off the social security numbers. My boys will probably like to have them when they have to clean out my shop.

      One of the the interesting things I found was the old black rotary dial telephone from my parents first house. After mother passed away and daddy went to an assisted living home we sold the house, I couldn’t just leave it there, that was my first phone, we even had a party line, so I took it and a wall mounted rotary dial phone. My wife saw them on my workbench and said she couldn’t believe I took the phone! Then I showed her the 2 more phones from our last 2 houses, yep, I took them too! I believe I will do some research and see if I can convert them to use on my landline in my shop.

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      • #4
        Haha, I still have the rotary dial wall phone from my parents old house 1961. Bell, white.
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

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        • #5
          I have a green wall phone in our kitchen. The grand kids like to call their cell phones to see how it works.

          I am retired central office from the late 70's and no conversion should be needed if you local company still works with dial pulse.

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          • #6
            Years ago, for an industry conference, I took an old rotary phone and made it into a wireless VoIP phone. It worked, everyone loved it. I can't remember what happened to it, but I should make another one. I have dealt with a traditional analog line in a very long time, but those phones probably still work on them. The software to understand the pulses was put into modern systems and probably never removed (speaking to your real, local telco, not VoIP, not the cable company, etc).

            Now I'm on eBay looking for a rotary phone.

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