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Everything is made in China, right?

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  • Everything is made in China, right?

    That's the wisdom and running joke that everybody knows. So imagine my surprise to see this...

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    Yes, Chinese-style soy sauce. Not made in China.

  • #2
    There was a small town in Japan with the name of Usa -pronounced oo sa (oo as in food). They made a few toys and sold them as "Made in USA". The US State Department had a go-round with the Japanese gov to get them to change it to Made in Usa, Japan, or something close to that.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #3
      So do you think they were trying to get away with something, or was it just an honest coincidence?

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      • #4
        Yeah. Just yesterday I was talking to an Amazon C/S agent about a anodized aluminum bar end plug that they in error showed available. She said the estimated delivery window was 1 to 3 months. I said how about a more specific date of manufacture. I know how long it takes freight to cross the Pacific. I asked if they were made in China and she said Taiwan, She was in the Philippines. Go figure.
        just another brick in the wall...

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        • #5
          Yeah, we're in a different world today, everything is interconnected. Lots of things r manufactured in another country but assembled in the USA and states made in USA.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Carlos View Post
            So do you think they were trying to get away with something, or was it just an honest coincidence?
            If you are asking me: Yes they were. It was intentional because the town had a Kanji character for the name, but the Japanese alphabetical designation for the sound was transliterated to u - sa - which would bring more attention to them.

            As to the OP, I am sure that while they did everything technically and legally correct; their intention is to play on people's minds. There is a huge % of the population that purchase on the impression/perception and not the reality.
            Hypothetical Example Only:How many cans of vegetables have nothing to do with animal fat but the labels will say "NO Animal FAT". OF Course it does not have animal fat, it is a plant. But how many people will purchase it because the perception is it is better than the can that does not have those words on it?

            Creating perception is not illegal but it bothers the heck out of me. LOML believes it. Don't get me started on cleaners and most children's OTC. Clorox is a great germ fighter, but they and other companies come out with all kinds of "cleaners" that are variations on the original product usually diluted 10 to 1 with water. LOML believes - This one is better for this, that one is better for that, and the other is better for other things. They ALL are different variations of dilution from the original and she will pay twice the price for more water. Children's medicine - we had that "discussion" last week when the grandkids were here. I showed her that the adult dosage was a teaspoon; the Childrens was half that, some strength. But she paid the higher price for the "Childrens" med.

            Advertising is primarily creating perception.
            Last edited by leehljp; 06-15-2018, 12:49 PM.
            Hank Lee

            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

            Comment


            • #7
              The animal fat thing is valid. I eat a mostly vegetarian diet with no oil and no salt. You might be shocked how many cans include added garbage. BUT...when they say something like "no animal" then I just assume that's because they used non-animal junk that I don't want to eat, and read very carefully. I can buy a can of beans that has one ingredient, or two ingredients, or a bunch of things including animal fat.

              But then you have "GLUTEN FREE!" on a bottle of olive oil, and I just want to go on a killing spree at that marketing company.

              Cans of "LITE" coconut milk for cooking are just watered versions of the regular one. At the same price. They add a little guar gum to bring the consistency back, but it's never the same.

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              • #8
                I'm also not a fan of the 0 calorie caffiene free water I've seen in the store. I guess we live in a time when what should be obvious, isn't.

                Opposite argument: Since I live in corn country, many of my neighbors were upset with the FDA decision that high fructose corn syrup can't be called corn sugar. I think they should go the opposite way and advertise the items with HFCS as "Sugar Free" and see what the FDA thinks of that.
                Chr's
                __________
                An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
                A moral man does it.

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                • #9
                  The proof that Smartwater doesn't work is that people keep paying $3/bottle for it.

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                  • #10
                    I have a lot of similar findings that I am challenged with.

                    Decades ago I was told that I have Type II Diabetes... and so I went on a binge to cut out as much sugar and carbs as I could. Not overly successful and here I am almost three decades later, luckly keeping it all under control with just a couple of pills a day. However, what a search I had trying to find "sugar-free" that really was... but it all had sugar in one form or another.... little things like "sugar free" popsicles that are made with sugar alcohol. Noting a spike in glucose level my Doc asked what I was doing, my reply of nothing and then the note of those popsicles, got a good glare from the Doc. Too many foods like that.

                    I hate products that don't say where they are made, and worse those that say "Made in U.S.A.", when in fact they are not. One of my ex employers did that, with old friends telling me that they were for a time, making units in China, shipping them back here for final repair (really sloppy work and materials) and clean-up and then slapping a "Made in U.S.A." label on them. Hopefully they stopped doing that.

                    Another thing that bothers me is when I shop for groceries and I see beef products that are priced exceptionally high and proudly labelled "Grass Fed".... okay, I've never worked on a cattle ranch, but have worked here in the East on dairy farms. But seems to me that every cow I ever saw was being fed grass! Do cattle ranches now have a cheaper way to feed their cattle instead of grazing (perhaps I just don't keep up with cattle technology)?

                    Sort of reminds me of being a little kid, a comic book fan at the time, and wondering about that amazing rocket ship or those X-ray glasses advertised in the back of almost every comic book. Seemed to be a lesson from Dad not to believe everything I saw advertised and perhaps most importantly to use my head just a wee bit and question what the labels say.

                    CWS
                    Last edited by cwsmith; 06-18-2018, 07:51 PM.
                    Think it Through Before You Do!

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                    • #11
                      Sugar alcohols are a godsend for me and they have no effect on my blood sugar. So I wonder if there's a personal difference, or something changed in them? Or the type? I use only erythritol. But I don't eat processed foods either and know exactly what is going into them; maybe there are other triggers? I've eaten it straight and then tested at 30/90/120 minutes with no statistically significant change.

                      Most cattle are not grass fed, and I have a place where I can buy both. Very different. Better or worse? Dunno, just different for me. Also grass-fed butter (Kerry Gold) is totally different from the butter that comes from cows fed soy and corn. For one, it will dissolve and suspend in hot water-based liquids, the corn/soy-fed will not. Feed corn is itself a bit odd. While I don't have the same GMO/organic fears some do, I'll just point out that it's all very highly manipulated.

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                      • #12
                        Interesting that "mots cattle are not grass fed".... They don't graze? I can't imagine how expensive that must be to have to house and grain feed beef cattle? Maybe I've watched too many Western's... but I thought that was why most of the beef cattle ranches were in the west, why the controversy over ranchers not wanting to pay the government for grazing on Federal lands, etc. etc.

                        Here in NY and PA, I see dairy cows grazing everywhere we travel. We spend a major portion of farm land and even adjacent field being mowed and bailed for hay during the winter season. When I was a teen, I used to work for several farmers, doing the "haying", cleaning the barns, etc. Both locally and at my grandparents in PA, and one of my Uncles in Maryland. The latter was quite large (Roundtree Dairly).... all had grazing lands.

                        I remember grain-feeding smaller stock, like pigs and chickens, I don't recall doing so for cattle. But then I didn't work there during winters, just figured that's what all those bails of hay were for.

                        Regarding the diabetes.... Yes, the sugar alcohol is what I thought too, shouldn't be a problem. But back then I used to check my glucose three or four times a day and my A1C every three months. Never noticed much of an impact on my daily monitoring, but my A1C went way up. At that time, when I was first diagnosed, I cut out just about everything... no bread, no more Burger King, no pizza, no more of my wife's baking, etc. But today, I don't really care... I don't eat white bread to any degree, but I still have occasional pizza, the occasional piece of cake, and I love ice cream. I'm 5' 11" and weigh 178 and my A1C is 5.6. A guy has got to live!

                        But you are right in that each and every one of us is different. My son is diabetic and he can't eat any of the stuff that I do... but he isn't all that disciplined either and I think he just eats out too much. At 48, he weighs about 220 or so, it bounces up and down, and he gets little of no exercise. Personally, I think weight and exercise is the key. I know that if I put on 5 or 10 pounds it makes a huge difference in my blood sugar. I grew up being a really skinny kid. When I got married in 1967, I weighed about 120 (wife is too good of a cook I think). When I got diagnosed for being Type 2, I weighed 206 (invention of the computer and eating too much crap out of the vending machine to keep from falling asleep as I sat on my backside). Obviously, I had to make some changes!

                        CWS
                        Think it Through Before You Do!

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                        • #13
                          I've found that cutting out processed food, salt, and oil has stabilized my blood sugar and cured my joint pains. That's what I stick with. That means rarely eating breads, but I don't worry about carbs per se and they don't affect me much any more. Even potatoes--but not covered in salt and butter.

                          I don't know the economics of cattle, but have tasted the difference between grass-fed and the soy/corn cows. And like I said, the butter, side by side, is so very different.

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                          • #14
                            A Texas rancher once told me that it doesn't matter what cattle are raised on; they're still fattened on corn in feedlots at the end of the cycle. As for butter, there are two kinds: cultured and sweet cream. Entirely different processes. If you want some butter taste, look for the word "cultured" on the label. I heard about the difference a few years ago and my wife and I went on a taste test campaign to find the best flavored butter to eat on warm sourdough. I think the result was that Trader Joe had the best bang/buck ratio. Ultimately, everything tasted more intense when we were kids, though.

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                            • #15
                              His assertions may be mainstream, for some cases, but are not true overall. The FDA has guidelines on what can be called grass fed or not. Also a big load of corn/soy at the end doesn't really change the taste of the meat as much as what it has eaten the rest of its life. Unless you believe producers are outright lying and the regulators just don't care.

                              There's a much bigger difference in butters, to my palate and my wife's, between the grass-fed and others versus cultured or not. We've run the gamut on butters and settled on Sprout's brand for basic things and Kerry where you can really taste it or where we want it to dissolve in water. Try some butter in espresso for a treat that sounds crazy and tastes amazing. Also salted or not...she prefers salted for some things, and unsalted for others. I prefer unsalted for everything.

                              Lately I've also been ordering in various cheeses from a variety of sources all around the world.

                              Funny conversation I guess for someone who only eats animal products a couple times a month...but she's a cheese and butter fiend.

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