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Tools that will make your day ------ $20 or less

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  • Tools that will make your day ------ $20 or less

    Feel free to add. Here's the things I've found were incredibly useful, and didn't cost a fortune

    a) Bessey - 4 piece clutch clamp set (Home Depot)

    True - there's a difference between Bessey and BESSEY. I have both. However, this little set delivers
    pretty good value for $20. There's similar sets from DeWalt, and I'd guess Irwin. These clamps deliver 600 lbs
    of power - which is fine for most applications. For big glue-ups, I have special clamps.

    b) Irwin corner clamp (Lowes)

    True 90 degree joins have always given me fits ---- until I got this. I built a bookshelf in half the time it usually takes.
    I absolutely love this tool.

    c) 3/8" dowel drilling kit (Rockler)

    I have tried a lot of different approaches for jonery ---- the dowel is my go-to.
    This handy little jig often goes on sale. It's worth every penny.
    I like this more than my fancy auto-center jig. The clear plastic is super easy to align with the pencil mark.
    This jig doesn't take any time to get onto the wood. It'll always be spot-on ----- as long as you're using true 3/4"


    d) Empire true blue speed square

    My eyes are getting old -------- so small print is awful for reading. Empire totally made my day when
    I picked up their blue speed square. I can read and cut quickly, again.
    Stanley and Milwaukee make some high visibility squares, as well.
    The blue is perfect for my eyes.

    e) Gent's saw (woodworking store of your choice)
    I picked mine up on sale at woodcraft. Great little saw that allows me to work close-in.
    When I feel artsy, I do hand-cut dovetails with it.

    f) Vertical Pen Blank Drilling Jaws
    I make pens - which means I need my pen blanks centered on the drilling vise.
    Penn State industries offers these really cool inserts for just $13 ------- they have a perfectly vertical
    slot, so your blank gets a straight hole in it. My pens come out much nicer, now that I have centered holes.
    If you ever need help drilling a centered hole ------ this is going to help you a ton.


  • #2
    Kreg auto-clamps--no adjustment, one handed operation.

    Comment


    • #3
      Concerning the 12 inch speed squares, I have two of these: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Johnson-...-120/100353818
      I was looked for my spray fluorescent paint to paint them last year but did not have any on hand - that I could find. Instead, I painted them White! Best thing I could have done. Easy to spot and reading is surprising good. Now I don't need a third one.

      BUT I almost bought an Empire on several occasions, simply because they were easy to read.
      Hank Lee

      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

      Comment


      • #4
        a) Spring Tools 32R02-1 Nail Set and Counter Punch (online at various suppliers) Under $11

        My wife bought this for me as a birthday gift. Caught me by surprise because I already had an automatic center punch. Not only didn't I ask for this, I didn't even know it existed.
        I rarely use my automatic center punch anymore, I like the action of this more. But even better than that, the nail set function on this is so much better than using a nail set and hammer! I can control the action so much better, and actually end up getting nail setting done faster and cleaner. Never would have believed it.
        I think the wife searched online for neat tools and found somebody recommending this. I concur. One of my most appreciated tools.
        I see they have a chisel to... hmmm, might have to check that out!

        b) Clamp-it clips, 3/4" GRP40609 (Rockler) Under $10

        Picked up a set of these in anticipation of building a bunch of new kitchen cabinets with the wife. Figured they might be helpful. The wife was helping with assembly and saw how handy they were. "Do you haven any more of these?", she asked. I only had a set of four, but after seeing how effective they were, I'm ordering more. They held the 3/4" plywood panels that I was assembling at right angles firmly, and most importantly, at accurate right angles to each other. Made assembly much lower stress. I've use the Craftsman corner clamps (similar to the screw style Irwin corner clamps) but these clips are much faster and easier.

        c) Rockler Silicone Glue Brush 45624 (Rockler) Under $5 / 3-Piece Silicone Glue Application Kit 43662 (Rockler) Under $15

        Didn't know what I was missing without these silicone glue applicators. They aren't so much different on the application side - I've used acid brushes for that before, and made crude "glue rakes" for surface glue spreading. Hence I can't say that they made a big improvement on the usage side. (But I do find them somewhat easier to use). The real savings is in cleanup. The silicone just makes it easy to clean up. I like them so much that I no longer use my finger to spread glue (which causes other problems).

        Comment


        • #5
          On the Clamp-its, Jet has something similar, but larger and it self-adjusts to any thickness. I don't know about you, but I don't mill to some precise thickness. When it all looks good, that's the thickness it will be. The Jets use a big flat metal spring clamp to hold in place. Because they are strong, they hold even while moving your project around.

          +100 on their gluing kit, the tray and small brush are in constant use here.

          Comment


          • Slik Geek
            Slik Geek commented
            Editing a comment
            I use these Camp-Its for gluing up 3/4" plywood panels, haven't tried them on "real wood". They fit well on the 23/32" thick panels that I am assembling right now. Rockler claims that they accommodate 13/16'' (26/32") max - I expect they would fit tightly on those. They have some resilience so they accommodate some range of material thickness.
            I'd seen the Jet clamps a while back. Also saw some harsh reviews that they broke easily. Apparently they are quite a bit more expensive than the Rocker version - I can't tell for sure because they may have been discontinued. I think they may have been two to four times the cost. Part of what attracted me to the Rocker version is that at $2.50/each, the price point was low enough to make it easy to say "yes!" I didn't have that reaction some time ago when I saw the Jet version. I ordered additional ones today - they were so handy!

        • #6
          Clamp-it clips, 3/4" GRP40609 (Rockler)
          I looked these up ----- really interested, and will check them out the next time I'm at Rockler.

          Comment


          • Slik Geek
            Slik Geek commented
            Editing a comment
            I also bought the 1/2" version for shop drawer case construction. Haven't tried them yet, but I expect I'll love them too. The best feature is that the slip into place in a fraction of a second. During glue-up positioning they barely distract you for a second to install. Not like the slow screw clamp of older designs.

        • #7
          Originally posted by durango dude View Post
          Feel free to add. Here's the things I've found were incredibly useful, and didn't cost a fortune a) Bessey - 4 piece clutch clamp set (Home Depot) True - there's a difference between Bessey and BESSEY. I have both. However, this little set delivers pretty good value for $20. There's similar sets from DeWalt, and I'd guess Irwin. These clamps deliver 600 lbs of power - which is fine for most applications. For big glue-ups, I have special clamps. b) Irwin corner clamp (Lowes) True 90 degree joins have always given me fits ---- until I got this. I built a bookshelf in half the time it usually takes. I absolutely love this tool. c) 3/8" dowel drilling kit (Rockler) I have tried a lot of different approaches for jonery ---- the dowel is my go-to. This handy little jig often goes on sale. It's worth every penny. I like this more than my fancy auto-center jig. The clear plastic is super easy to align with the pencil mark. This jig doesn't take any time to get onto the wood. It'll always be spot-on ----- as long as you're using true 3/4" d) Empire true blue speed square My eyes are getting old -------- so small print is awful for reading. Empire totally made my day when I picked up their blue speed square. I can read and cut quickly, again. Stanley and Milwaukee make some high visibility squares, as well. The blue is perfect for my eyes. e) Gent's saw (woodworking store of your choice) I picked mine up on sale at woodcraft. Great little saw that allows me to work close-in. When I feel artsy, I do hand-cut dovetails with it. f) Vertical Pen Blank Drilling Jaws I make pens - which means I need my pen blanks centered on the drilling vise. Penn State industries offers these really cool inserts for just $13 ------- they have a perfectly vertical slot, so your blank gets a straight hole in it. My pens come out much nicer, now that I have centered holes. If you ever need help drilling a centered hole ------ this is going to help you a ton.
          Here is a list of tools under 20$ 1 fiskars steel bypass pruning shears = price at 14$ ,Ideal for cutting stems and light branches. Easy-open lock protects the blade during transport and storage. Low-friction coating helps blade glide through wood, prevents the blades from gumming up with sap and debris and helps the blades resist rust. 2 Amazon basics folding sawhorse= price at 20$ after discount. Works for both professional construction and home-based projects Folds flat for easy storage and transportation Safety features include locking braces, non-slip feet and fold-out stoppers. 3 Velcro brand for gardening= price at 4$. GENTLE ON PLANTS: Soft side won’t scratch or damage plants; wraps onto itself for a secure hold; plant supports are easy to reposition for growing blooms CUT TO LENGTH: Use only the desired amount; reusable and adjustable; ideal for year after year use for tomato cages and supports WEATHER RESISTANT: Strong gripping action keeps ties securely in place during stormy and inclement weather 4 Dewalt dwa2t40ir impact ready flextorq driving set, 40 piece= price at 20$. Minimizes Drops Reduces Wobbles & Breakage 10x Magnetic Screw Lock FlexTorq allows bits to flex up to 15 degrees 10x Magnetic Screw Lock system Minimizes drops and reduces wobbling Reduces breakage and longer life And the list go on. I have also read this guide which tells about 15 different power tools everyone must have.But i want a list of tools which are best for carpentry. Can anyone suggest me?
          Last edited by dbhost; 06-03-2019, 12:43 PM. Reason: removed link that was flagged as a security vulnerability.

          Comment


          • #8
            What can be said about the drill bit Neiko 00823A for handicrafts and professional work with porcelain, I, as an amateur of handmade work, really like these drills, they are cheap and reliable. Drills are universal, they can also be used for work with ceramics and glass.
            Last edited by dbhost; 06-04-2019, 01:15 PM. Reason: Suspect domain linked. Removed link for potential safety issues.

            Comment


            • #9
              Two spammers in one thread. Awesome.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by Carlos View Post
                Two spammers in one thread. Awesome.
                Links removed.
                Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Not necessarily woodworking, but I was really impressed with the Harbor Freight oscillating tool. It came in handy for several home improvement projects.

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    That tool was VERY impressive! I picked up the battery version because I needed to work in some tight spaces and possibly without power. I already owned the original Fein version of it. The Fein was close to $300 for the full kit, the HF around $35 I think, though with fewer blades and extras. The HF was impressive. I ended up getting rid of both and got the Dewalt battery version, because all my tools are now Dewalt lithium. It's slightly better than both of the others.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by Carlos View Post
                      That tool was VERY impressive! I picked up the battery version because I needed to work in some tight spaces and possibly without power. I already owned the original Fein version of it. The Fein was close to $300 for the full kit, the HF around $35 I think, though with fewer blades and extras. The HF was impressive. I ended up getting rid of both and got the Dewalt battery version, because all my tools are now Dewalt lithium. It's slightly better than both of the others.
                      I too have the original Fein from nearly 25 years ago and even though expensive as it was, I had to do some huge bathroom rework with considerable amount of tile at the time for my mom, she said she did NOT want a lot of dust. So, it was a Fein. The original Fein locked the blade in with a screw and it sometimes allowed the blade to turn. Two son-in-laws borrowed it on occasion and I carried it back and forth to Japan with me. By 2011 when I came back from Japan, I bought another with the better locking system. I really like it and my 2 son in laws fight over the old one.

                      That said, like you, I have considered a battery powered one. Since I have 7 Ryobi 18V 4Mah batteries, I am thinking of trying the Ryobi one. But the Fein works so dang well and has a long cord. LONG cords on high quality tools are not as limiting as short cords on long extension cords. I have found that many quality tools from overseas have much better, longer flexible cords than even the very good tools in the USA. That little bit of extra attention prevents the quality tools from having limited appeal psychologically - to me. I generally hate corded now, but I don't get that feeling when I pick up my corded Fein or my Japanese Hitachi 7" circular saw with the extra long and very flexible cord.
                      Hank Lee

                      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        I bought my Fein for a flooring project too, though it was laminate and the number one need was undercutting quickly without a mess. I did use it for cutting off some tile edges to meet the laminate also. The Dewalt steps it up a notch with instant blade changes AND being able to use the old screw blades, a light, and a few other niceties. I rarely need it, but when I do, nothing else works. Like "drilling" square holes for switches and displays in our new RV recently. I don't feel like the battery has lost anything, though the overall tool is a bit bigger and heavier.

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