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When did you shop last look like this?

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  • When did you shop last look like this?

    With the BT and my main bench/outfeed out of the shop I took the opportunity for a spring clean. Figuring once the new sawstop is in it will be a long time until its this clear again I painted most of the walls and floor. Last coat went on yesterday and it nearly looks like it did when I first moved in 7 or 8 years ago. I wonder how long I can keep it this way.

    How often do you give your shop a good cleaning?

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    Jon

    Phoenix AZ - It's a dry heat
    ________________________________

    We all make mistakes and I should know I've made enough of them
    techzibits.com

  • #2
    Never!
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #3
      Shortly after I built it. That lasted about five minutes. Since I have more stuff than space, It will never look look that again.
      Jim Frye
      The Nut in the Cellar.
      ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

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      • #4
        My shop oscillates from extreme clutter and disarray to RodKirby like tidiness. When I'm working on a project, it tends to get messy and then cleaned up before the next project is started. About every other year it gets a thorough cleaning and I do the extensive cleaning, alignment and maintenance on tools.

        Right now the shop is mostly a disaster. I have DC piping in a pile on the floor and fittings and hoses everywhere, all the parts for 9 cabinets are cut and piled but not assembled and installed, and the neighbor kids needed help building cars to ride down the bike path between our houses, and it is still only half unpacked from the move.

        As far as the last time my shop was that clean and tidy ... Summer 2019 when photos were taken to sell the house.
        Chr's
        __________
        An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
        A moral man does it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by twistsol View Post
          My shop oscillates from extreme clutter and disarray to RodKirby like tidiness. When I'm working on a project, it tends to get messy and then cleaned up before the next project is started. About every other year it gets a thorough cleaning and I do the extensive cleaning, alignment and maintenance on tools.

          Right now the shop is mostly a disaster. I have DC piping in a pile on the floor and fittings and hoses everywhere, all the parts for 9 cabinets are cut and piled but not assembled and installed, and the neighbor kids needed help building cars to ride down the bike path between our houses, and it is still only half unpacked from the move.

          As far as the last time my shop was that clean and tidy ... Summer 2019 when photos were taken to sell the house.
          I always remember those photos of Rod Kirby's shop and how amazingly clean they were. I challenge you to find even a speck of sawdust.

          With this reorg of Woodshop 2.0 as LOML is calling it I am going to try and make a real effort to keep the dust under control. The 3 biggest offenders for me are the Miter Saw, Lathes and all sanding.

          For sanding I am considering investing in a Festool setup. Not sure exactly which sanders or vac yet but all the folks who use them say they really do keep the dust at bay. I know its a chunk of cash but none of the sanders I have used before or the vacs I attach seem to be able to do a good job. I am also trying to see how I might works some form of downdraft setup into my new bench top.

          The miter saw is a royal pain. My previous setup had lower and upper ducting. Connected to my DC it seemed to be useless, especialy the lower section. The shop vac did a better job than the dc when connected to the upper port but dust still sprays everywhere. I have no room for a big hood so am looking for some ideas.

          Similar issue with the Lathe. Pretty much impossible to stop the spray. I have been using a "big gulp" style which does OK with dust but no solution for chips. One of the biggest issues is that it tends to spray all over the shop so am goin gto setup a showcurtain arrangement to at least try and keep them all in one place :-) How do you other turners manage chips and dust?
          Jon

          Phoenix AZ - It's a dry heat
          ________________________________

          We all make mistakes and I should know I've made enough of them
          techzibits.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by poolhound View Post

            The miter saw is a royal pain.
            My shop is my garage and my miter saw is on a cart. I usually roll it out on to the driveway to do my cutting outdoors. depending on the time of day, sunlight often washes out the laser line, but I don't often rely on that.

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            • #7
              My shop walls are painted and I keep them clean... the floor is bare concrete with some stains from the prior home owner. I wouldn't mind coating it but the front half of this space serves as a car repair garage so whatever I use has to tolerate that kind of mess. And the floor covering would also have to withstand spatter from a GMAW/MIG welder. Ergo it stays bare concrete. I have foam mats in front of the main woodworking bench.

              I use a Ryobi leaf blower to dust off the shop, and clean the floors, at the end of each shop day. That, plus having a hard-piped dust collection system, keeps the sawdust mess at bay. Usually I have little sawdust to clean up unless I used hand planes... then I have to use the extension hose on the DC piping to clean the floor before leaf blowing. Once every few weeks I pull each roll-around tool cart away from the wall to clean behind it; sawdust accumulates on the raised foundation edge. As does spider webs.

              When I use the lathe... I don't even try to collect the mess it makes. I plan on a big clean-up vacuuming session (with a DC hose again - I've got a drop specifically for the lathe) once the turning is complete. Some lathe shavings pile up between the lathe and the table it is mounted to, a lot ends up on the floor behind it, and the majority ends up on the floor just in front of it. Short of putting the lathe stand on top of a large grate - like the air vents for subways - connected to a zillion CFM dust collector I don't think there is a strategy to collect the shavings in real time. Attach a shop-vac hose to whatever turning tool you are using?... as if that were even possible. A booth or curtains would keep the mess localized at least. I have a few cabinets a bit behind my lathe that act as a wall so the actual clean-up area is small. Cleaning around the lathe itself - it's a MIDI model so the motor is just below the main bed rails - takes more time. My lathe has more corners, nooks, and crannies... and the motor cooling fins are chip magnets.

              For sanding I made a downdraft box out of pine, with a 1/4inch pegboard top. That does okay; combined with the overhead air filter I don't have much sawdust floating around the shop while hand sanding. When using a ROS or other power sander I use Rockler's Dust Right FlexiPort hose kit Y'ed into the downdraft box's 4 inch inlet. I have pretty good luck with that combination. 80% or better.

              As for other "messes" in the shop: the RAS table typically has a stack of parts for whatever project is currently in the works. I rarely use the CMS as it is rather wedged into a corner on a Ridgid MSUV; it's easier to use the BT3 or the RAS for crosscuts. The RAS has good dust collection thanks to the funnel I attached behind it. When I do use the CMS it's mostly for 2x4 or 2x6 construction style projects and it gets set up outside the shop. Projects like a quick-n-dirty candy ramp for last Halloween (the kiddies loved it!), temporary 2x4 scaffolds to support cabinets while I attach them to the wall, etc.

              So my shop tends to stay fairly clean and organized but not Rod Kirby clean.

              mpc

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