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  • New Shop Electrical Question

    I'm confused about how to wire the 250v 20a outlet in the new shop. Since this is in the basement, 2020 NEC requires a GFCI for all outlets in the basement. No problem, I. have a 20 AMP 2 pole GFCI breaker.

    Question is I have two hot wires, ground and neutral at the outlet. Do I tie the ground and Neurtal together or is the neutral left unconnected or do I do something altogether different?

    The front and back of the receptacle are shown below.

    Click image for larger version

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    Chr's
    __________
    An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
    A moral man does it.

  • #2
    The neutral is not absolutely necessary (I found that out overseas) but in general the neutral should be attached. I would get a different outlet that had a place for the neutral wire (white) AND ground (green) wire.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #3
      I have never done a 220 receptacle, but have done a couple of houses full of 120's. I generally leave the higher voltage stuff to an electrician; and please note that I am NOT an electrician by trade, but I have passed a few inspections.

      I'm not clear on what you mean by your description, "two hot wires, ground and neutral" Are you meaning that you have four wires total or two wires which are ground and neutral?

      With typical NM cable you should have is a black wire (hot), a white wire, (common), and a ground wire which is usually bare or sometimes green; you may also have a red wire, which is also hot.

      Typically, most receptacles that I've used are marked for color, OR the terminal screws are coded (silver for white wires [common] and brass for black [hot] wires.) The green screw is for the ground wire. The receptacle that you show is for "end of line", meaning you can't put that in the middle of the circuit as there's no provision for additional wires to pass on to the next receptacle.

      So, with the receptacle pictured from the back, the black wire would go on the right, white wire on the left (that's the 'T' slot side), and the bare copper would go on the upper-right green terminal.

      Hopefully a real electrician will jump in here.

      CWS
      Think it Through Before You Do!

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      • #4
        The wire I ran was 10/3 so red, black, white, and ground. For ovens 60A / dryer or well 30A / etc. it is normal to have four wires and the neutral is only used for the 110 components of the appliance like clocks and lights. From further research, it looks like the neutral is simply not connected and I could have run 10/2 wire and colored the white wire black or red at both ends. What is throwing me is that the breaker has a neutral pigtail on it.

        Of course with this being a new code requirement that it now be a GFCI circuit, I can't find any specific examples. I'm going to have to call the inspector to see how he expects it to be done.
        Chr's
        __________
        An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
        A moral man does it.

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        • #5
          240 volt circuits and connections are common on yachts, where I usually work. There are only three wires necessary for 240 volt connections; the two hots (preferably a black and a red) and the ground. When there are 4-wire cables or plugs, they include a neutral so that a 120 volt circuit can be branched out with one hot, a neutral, and a ground. That is useful where a stove uses 240 for the heating elements, but 120 for the clock, timer, etc. This will show the correct wiring for your outlet:
          http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-w...t-outlets.html

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          • #6
            Originally posted by d_meister View Post
            240 volt circuits and connections are common on yachts, where I usually work. There are only three wires necessary for 240 volt connections; the two hots (preferably a black and a red) and the ground. When there are 4-wire cables or plugs, they include a neutral so that a 120 volt circuit can be branched out with one hot, a neutral, and a ground. That is useful where a stove uses 240 for the heating elements, but 120 for the clock, timer, etc. This will show the correct wiring for your outlet:
            http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-w...t-outlets.html
            And that is the correct answer. I found the below on the Square D website. It shows that with a two wire + ground 250 volt outlet, the neutral is left disconnected between the panel and the receptacle, but I do need to connect the neutral pigtail to the neutral bus in the panel for the GFCI to function correctly.


            Wiring 250v 2 wire outlet showing two hot wires and ground with neutral not connected.
            Chr's
            __________
            An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
            A moral man does it.

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            • #7
              Good, because that was what I was thinking. But wasn't really sure because I've never had to do it.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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              • #8
                About 1/3 of my stationary tools are 220V. I use this plug and as noted already 2 hots and a ground. No neutral.



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