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  • Pipe clamps

    There is a post on craigslist for some pipe clamps. The seller claims them to be pony 3/4" pipe clamps on galvanized steel pipe, (7) 3/4" of various lengths and (5) of 1/2" again of various lengths. What would be a fair price to offer or expect to pay? Anything to look for when inspecting, aside from cracks in the castings?
    I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

  • #2
    It's hard to advise without seeing them. I usually come across just the clamp ends at flea markets for around $3-$5. The pipe is relatively cheap. Without any asking price I would find out what he's looking for.

    They either work or they don't. Some cracks would be hard to detect. If they were dropped it's possible. Hard to think they were cracked from being used in a glue up.
    .

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    • #3
      The 3/4" plate style clamps at HF are 6.99. I've never had one fail or slip. Mine are all on black pipe. Best price on Amazon was under $9 for the 3/4" Pony.

      The pipe is worth something but I have read comments that the galvanizing flakes off and gets into the wood/finish and that the clamps will sometimes slip on galvanized pipe.

      I would make an offer of $5 each to start. If the seller isn't in a hurry he can probably get $10.
      Don, aka Pappy,

      Wise men talk because they have something to say,
      Fools because they have to say something.
      Plato

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      • #4
        I can attest to galvanizing staining wood in glue ups. Forget about the pipes. HF sells the 3/4" pipe clamps on sale frequently for $4.99, if you want to buy the Pony's, that's fine, but don't offer more than $5.00 each for them...
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        • #5
          Those clamps are only worth what you think they're worth to you. Be it $1 or $10 it matters only to you and the seller. But, to compare the Pony's to HF's version when considering worth is just wrong. All my pipe clamps happen to be from HF but they certainly are not on the same quality level as the Pony's. Kinda like comparing Jet parallel clamps to the HF parallel clamps, not nearly the same.
          _________________________
          "Have a Great Day, unless you've made other plans"

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          • #6
            I spoke with the owner and he says the 1/2" were bought new while the 3/4" were from garage sales. I asked him if the paint was still on the clamps or if they were rusted up badly and he claimed that the paint is on and they are in good shape. I also asked if they operate well and he said that they do. He is asking for $75 for all the clamps and a ratcheting strap clamp. I would like to offer just $60 for the pipe clamps only. I don't have any pipe clamps.

            As for the pipe, it runs about $2/ft locally for 3/4". I have no idea if HD charges to thread it or not. Considering its sold in 10' lengths, it would take four 10' just to make up the 3/4" pipes in the deal.
            I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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            • #7
              I think $75 is a fair to decent price, especially if they are indeed Pony clamps with a multiple plate clutch. I've never used galvanized, only black pipe. Galvanized still should be good.
              Erik

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              • #8
                I guess a price somewhere round $60 to $70 would be fair. As far as the pipe; I replaced all my gal. pipe with black iron. It holds the clutch system better, doesn't stain as much and most plumbing shops sell it (threaded) in pretty much any length you need.
                RuffSawn
                Nothin' smells better than fresh sawdust!

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                • #9
                  I thought it was the black iron that had the staining issues, especially with tannin filled woods like oak. Did I remember it wrong?
                  I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chopnhack View Post
                    I thought it was the black iron that had the staining issues, especially with tannin filled woods like oak. Did I remember it wrong?
                    I haven't had any staining issues with black pipe, but have with galvanized. Not sure about which woods or what other than the ones I have used, but yeah, Oak, Poplar, and Pecan all get nasty stains from Galvanized pipe... I have to put some sort of barrier between the pipe and the workpiece if I am using a galvanized pipe clamp setup...
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                    • #11
                      Fantasic discussion. Would mineral spirits help with either form of pipe? Saran wrap?
                      I have a little blog about my shop

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dbhost View Post
                        I haven't had any staining issues with black pipe, but have with galvanized. Not sure about which woods or what other than the ones I have used, but yeah, Oak, Poplar, and Pecan all get nasty stains from Galvanized pipe... I have to put some sort of barrier between the pipe and the workpiece if I am using a galvanized pipe clamp setup...
                        It's a good thought, if I nab those clamps I will have to remember to put a piece of tape on the bars under the workpiece during clamp up. Thanks
                        I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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                        • #13
                          i must admit I'm not a fan of pipe clamps.
                          I wouldn't buy them for practically any price.
                          I have a couple I bought in a weak moment and they are still in the package.

                          Pros - you can customize the length by changing and even concatenating pipe sections, long clamps are thus readily available, also they are relatively cheap
                          Cons - heavy, very heavy. Long sections bend/flex too much, particularly 1/2" pipe. 3/4" better but even heavier. work better when short but then, for short lengths other clamps work better and are lighter.
                          Loring in Katy, TX USA
                          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
                            Cons - heavy, very heavy. Long sections bend/flex too much, particularly 1/2" pipe. 3/4" better but even heavier. work better when short but then, for short lengths other clamps work better and are lighter.

                            Yes, I agree, pipe clamps are heavy. I don't find that to be a deterrent to using them. If the correct length of pipe is used for the clamping procedure, and there is bending, it could be likely that the joint is not well fitted. Good joints should not need excessive clamping pressure, but rather just enough to bring the gluing surfaces together.

                            When I started woodworking, pipe clamps were my first type of clamps. Most were bought at flea markets and shops that were closing down. Most all were galvanized pipe, with which I have no problems. Back then there wasn't a large selection of clamp types, or places to buy them, as there is today.


                            DISCLAIMER: There is no intention to offend any individual as to what type of clamp or pipe they prefer or use. A preference towards one type of clamp or another does not infer that one is inferior/superior to the other.

                            The term "pipe" is a relative term not specific to any type of pipe, such as; steel pipe, iron pipe, glass pipe, stove pipe, bag pipe, smoking pipe, tobacco pipe, exhaust pipe, or pipe dreams.

                            .

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by CocheseUGA View Post
                              Fantasic discussion. Would mineral spirits help with either form of pipe? Saran wrap?
                              I've had black pipe clamps stain wood, mainly around squeeze out of my tightbond. If I do need to use them for big glue ups I'll use a piece of wax paper between the pipe and the joint.
                              Erik

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