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Repair it or send it back

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  • Repair it or send it back

    I picked up half a dozen unfinished doors from Menards, hung them last weekend and pulled down the doors this morning to finish them. On one of the doors I noticed the veneer is peeling. It will be 6-8 weeks to replace it if I send it back.

    If I glue it in the shop, what is the best way to clamp that? This is on one of the cross piece of a 3 panel door.


    Door with peeling veneer
    Chr's
    __________
    An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
    A moral man does it.

  • #2
    A good flat board with at least 2 cauls would be the only way to get even pressure across the damaged area.
    Don, aka Pappy,

    Wise men talk because they have something to say,
    Fools because they have to say something.
    Plato

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    • #3
      I think I'd be inclined to shoot some 3M 77 spray adhesive into that gap and press it down by hand or set a heavy weight on top of it while it's lying flat. Or some wood glue on a popsicle stick or wood sliver smeared inside and then weighted down.

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      • #4
        Agree with the others. I'd let Menards hear about it but wouldn't go through the hassle of returning.
        just another brick in the wall...

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        • #5
          Agree with the others. Too much hassle to return. I'd probably go with putting some painters tape on the good surfaces (to catch squeeze out), laying it flat and putting some glue in the gap. Then put a weight on it for a day.

          I'd try to put the door in an inconspicuous location if possible (if it's the same size and handing as another). Good luck.
          Bill

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          • #6
            It looks like maybe it released because it was too long initially or "grew" from moisture/humidity. I would try to release it from the near attached end and have a look under it to see if it was glue starved originally and try to determine what type of adhesive was used. If it was contact cement, then the Super 77 atgcpaul suggested would likely be best, as carpenter's glue would not adhere well to contact cement residue. If the end grain is exposed in an air conditioned environment for a couple of days, it could shrink back to original dimensions prior to a repair. How does the other end of the veneer look? If there is a gap, it may have been positioned incorrectly in the first place. It's more likely that it was cut from a pre-clad piece, though. Another possibility is to press it down with a dry clothes iron and then keep pressing it with a laminate "J" roller until it cools. Try any heat on a non visible area first, since some woods darken when heated.

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            • #7
              I agree with everyone's assessment on fixing it yourself, BUT I would call Menards to see what they are willing to do first. Chances are it will take longer than you can wait and you will probably get a "Sorry, that is all we can do" person at best; However, there is probably a 1 in 50 chance that you will get the right person at the right moment that might make it worth your while just to call. All you will lose is a phone call if they don't offer any help; but you could be rewarded with 10% or $25 coupon towards something else; they might ask you send a picture and receipt. Won't hurt to try.
              Hank Lee

              Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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              • #8
                Thanks everyone. I was inclined to fix it myself and we have three of the same handing for the master suite. Since this will be on the back side of the door, I think it will end up in the closet where the door will be open nearly all of the time and it will be hidden.
                Chr's
                __________
                An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
                A moral man does it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've had very good luck with using my wife's clothes iron to heat up the veneer to re-flow the hot-melt glue under it.

                  I use a layer of brown grocery sack paper to protect the veneer and substrate. keep the the iron moving.

                  Pretty much zero risk, in my experience, and it worked.

                  (Oops! Just noticed the d-meister posted the same advice. Great minds think alike!)
                  Last edited by eccentrictinkerer; 06-23-2017, 11:15 PM.
                  You might think I haven't contributed much to the world, but a large number
                  of the warning labels on tools can be traced back to things I've done...

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                  • #10
                    Heating with an iron is a great idea that I hadn't thought about.
                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      Do be careful with the iron. I have used an iron to repair lifted veneer, and even though I've done it successfully, sometimes it makes things worse. If it's too hot or left in a spot too long on real wood veneers, the iron will shrink the veneer and it will crack. Even though wood is supposed to expand with moisture, I've had very little success reversing the shrinkage.

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                      • #12
                        I guess I'd go with the opinions here on doing the repair youself. BUT, I certainly wouldn't be happy with it and view such things as "buying damaged goods"... for that I'd expect some kind of discount. (I consider having to have something repaired or serviced soon after sale, is the same as buying "factory reconditioned"... I won't pay full price.)

                        The other concern would be that if I repaired it, without the retailer first knowing that I was going to attempt that, what happens if your repair goes wrong... it loosens the rest of the veneer or shrinks it? They certainly won't take it back then, claiming you damaged it.

                        Lastly, the state of construction these days really bothers the Dickens out of me. It poses a lot of questions in my head, like, A cross piece on your door has to be veneered? (Yeah, I know... that's how everything is these days! Has labor gotten so cheap or wood so expensive that veneering is more cost effective than using solid stock? What's underneath, chip board?

                        A couple of years ago I saw a damaged pine door at my local Lowes, and it was all veneer with chip board as a base. Veneered pine! My thought at the time was that I'd better learn how to make my own doors. I have had the need to buy any doors since then, but the thought is still there.

                        CWS
                        Think it Through Before You Do!

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