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  • Wish me luck !

    Hello Gurus,

    Bought my BT3100 a few years ago on Craigslist and did a flooring project. Shortly after that I had a neck injury which prevented me from doing any woodworking. The saw had been sitting idle in a corner for all these years. A year ago, I tried to do a project and noticed the blade raising mechanism isn't working so it went back into oblivion.

    In the meantime I discovered this forum.

    Tomorrow is a big day when I am planning to get the saw out and open it completely. Hopefully, it is just all the fine dust from the flooring project collected everywhere in the saw. Of course, I have read enough on this forum to know about the dreaded shims. I am hoping mine is not a shim problem

    I will follow some of the tips like lubricating with graphite, alignments and drawing the red line.

    I hope to get into the world of some serious woodworking. Wish me luck and please chime in your suggestions. Looking for any good advice.

    - NG

    PS - I plan to completely dismantle and reassemble the saw - does anyone this it is not a good idea after all? Thanks ....

  • #2
    Wishing you good luck!
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

    Comment


    • #3
      From the master...
      Attached Files
      Harumpf!
      GrumpyDad

      Comment


      • LCHIEN
        LCHIEN commented
        Editing a comment
        That one is not the latest. 4_13f is the latest. It is linked if you follow the links at the bottom of my posts. Its also in the sticky post at the top of the BT3x related discussion forum

    • #4
      Thanks leehljp and GrumpyDad for the support. I might have posted this in the wrong forum though so will post my subsequent questions in the BT3x00 forum.

      Comment


      • #5
        I hope you read my BT3 FAQ, linked at the bottom of each of my posts including this one.
        I find Johnsons Paste Wax is better than graphite powder! Read about it in the FAQ. And look it up on the forum.
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment


        • #6
          Originally posted by nicer20 View Post
          Hello Gurus,

          Bought my BT3100 a few years ago on Craigslist and did a flooring project. Shortly after that I had a neck injury which prevented me from doing any woodworking. The saw had been sitting idle in a corner for all these years. A year ago, I tried to do a project and noticed the blade raising mechanism isn't working so it went back into oblivion.

          In the meantime I discovered this forum.

          Tomorrow is a big day when I am planning to get the saw out and open it completely. Hopefully, it is just all the fine dust from the flooring project collected everywhere in the saw. Of course, I have read enough on this forum to know about the dreaded shims. I am hoping mine is not a shim problem

          I will follow some of the tips like lubricating with graphite, alignments and drawing the red line.

          I hope to get into the world of some serious woodworking. Wish me luck and please chime in your suggestions. Looking for any good advice.

          - NG

          PS - I plan to completely dismantle and reassemble the saw - does anyone this it is not a good idea after all? Thanks ....

          Accidentally got into this thread. Good luck. Or is it no longer necessary? How did it go?

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by daughterofgirl View Post


            Accidentally got into this thread. Good luck. Or is it no longer necessary? How did it go?
            I still need it. Unfortunately, I have not solved the blade raising and lowering problem. It is quite tight - something is definitely wrong. I have tried different methods recommended but not much luck. I am looking at dismantling and reassembling the saw again as soon as current project at hand is completed.

            Rest of the tune up has gone well otherwise. Thanks.

            - NG

            Comment


            • #8
              I think you probably have posted this on another thread and i don't remember the full discussion (aging problems ). There are three basic things that cause up and down problems:

              1. The two gears that are at right angle to each other up under the bottom. on these two gears (don't remember where) - is a screw. If the screw is too tight, it will be difficult to turn the wheel making it difficult to raise and lower. It has been a loooong time since I looked at that, but it "seems" like the screw controls the mesh of the two gears in some way. If too tight, it is hard to turn.

              2. Shims in one form or the other - I think you have worked through that problem.

              3. Riving knife rubbing against the back of the throat plate. Seems like this was also addressed.

              Unless something is out of kilter, those are the three basic problems with raising and lowering.

              There is the problem of setting for miter cuts in which the angle jumps when trying to lock, but that is another matter.

              Hank Lee

              Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

              Comment


              • #9
                Thanks leehljp : Yep I had sought help earlier and have followed most suggestions. daughterofgirl resurrected the thread so I was responding.

                Have done #2 & #3.

                I haven't disassembled the two gear mechanism you describe in #1. That's next on my task list as soon as current project is finished.

                I will post my findings once I get to it.

                Thanks.

                Comment


                • #10
                  I thin the technical name is crown gears.
                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Some BT3100 escaped the factory with the nut on the bottom of the elevation screw over tightened. You might try backing it off a half to one turn.
                    just another brick in the wall...

                    Comment


                    • nicer20
                      nicer20 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Praying it turns out to be that !!!! I have hopes since the previous owner said she used the saw very little and it has been like that since I got it. Fingers crossed.

                  • #12
                    Not looking good.

                    I have opened and checked the nut on the bottom. I don't believe it is a tight nut problem. Can you please watch this video and give your opinion.


                    https://youtu.be/0yjfJl3k0mk

                    Thanks in advance.

                    Update: I also tried loosening the nut 1/2 turn but no change

                    Here is what I request your opinions also on -

                    A. could it be that the motor mounting screws have been tightened too much making the channel that houses the shims grab the motor bracket too tight?

                    B. (see photo) I also noticed the flat shims (not the angled ones) that sit against the motor body are only covering partial surface on either sides. I think it is correct. Or did I make a mistake when installing such that both the "sliding surfaces" should have been covered by the shim?

                    I would like to hear any ideas before I go down the road of ordering and trying to replace the threaded inserts.

                    Thanks in advance for your help.

                    - NG

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I could not tell by looking at the video, but it does not seem to be a gear problem. It does seem to be something else too tight or out of place.
                      Hank Lee

                      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        leehljp Thanks for your feedback.

                        Here is an update - I loosened the 4 motor mounting screws and that made a difference. Additionally, I applied paste wax liberally. Here is how it is now -

                        https://youtu.be/WIPgfUOP4fc

                        For the first time since I have the saw it has moved this freely.

                        The screws are just finger tight. So, I don't know how this will all hold once I start the motor and start using the saw.

                        One thought I have is - take each screw out counting the number of turns it takes, apply thread locker (blue one which I believe is not permanent) and then set it back same number of turns.

                        Is that a good idea or something stupid &/or dangerous.

                        Thanks everyone in advance.

                        - NG

                        Important question - After watching the video, do the astute users believe that, at the least the threads on the motor mount are still intact? TIA.
                        Last edited by nicer20; 03-10-2021, 01:47 AM. Reason: Added the question on threads

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          That looks about as smooth as mine. And yes its always harder going up.
                          Now that is free, every few months apply Johnson's paste was to the shims and to the elevation screw.
                          Fortunately I have no experience messing with those screws and nuts so I can't offer much based on my experience.
                          My suggestion is to tighten the screws to the point where they bottom out give them low torque to set them and then try and see. Perhaps they were overtorqued and it distorted something. The BT3's are aluminum in many places (like the locker bracket the motor mounts to ) so highly torqueing fasteners was never a good idea.
                          If you can set them with minimal torque and it works OK then just use some nail polish to set the screw head to the motor as a locker.
                          Last edited by LCHIEN; 03-10-2021, 02:17 AM.
                          Loring in Katy, TX USA
                          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                          Comment

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