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  • Flip top tool stand

    I was tired of dealing with the small sander as a benchtop unit that was always in the way, and never ready to use. I mostly used the plan from Fix This Build That, with some small variations based on other plans and Youtube videos. It works pretty well. Today I'm going to run a power cord through the tube though, as dealing with cords was really annoying just testing it out. The dust collection will be a quick connect port (the DC tube drops from the ceiling, just out of the photos).

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  • #2
    Looks good from here. I made a flip cart for the same planer (gray, not orange) and sander. One of the best space saving things I did for my shop.

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    • #3
      It's funny that most of the videos I found for these were for people with the same tools, particularly the same sander. It's a cheap, simple, but so useful little tool.

      On Saturday morning I decided I don't want to deal with cables, so I took the cover off the top (flip) part, and ran electrical in it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Carlos View Post
        On Saturday morning I decided I don't want to deal with cables, so I took the cover off the top (flip) part, and ran electrical in it.
        You might want to consider putting those connections inside a box to comply with NEC, may avoid insurance issues in the unlikely event of a fire and is a safer option.
        --------------------------------------------------
        Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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        • #5
          It's been hot as **** in AZ, so I hadn't done much woodworking until this weekend. The table works great, and had the side effect of significantly reducing noise and vibration. The planer used to vibrate things off the top if you put them there. Now I'm using the top to hold in-progress pieces of wood. Almost zero vibration. Noise is greatly reduced too. I still have to work out the DC for the sander, but that won't be hard. I'm thinking a right-angle 4" plastic elbow that stays on the connection coming down from the ceiling, and connects to either the 4" planer outlet or a 4x2.5x2.5 for the sander. It has dual 2.5 outlets.

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          • #6
            I was trying to understand how this works. whether it really flips.
            Yes it does - saw the video here:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLSIgyhlwuU

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpjnMIjDh3c

            Nce job to the original designers and to Carlos.
            Last edited by LCHIEN; 11-05-2019, 01:19 AM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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            • #7
              Those were two of my inspirations, along with one other. It flips over pretty easily and stays balanced if you center the tools. I ended up offsetting the planer yesterday for better access, so it takes more careful work to flip it. I'm not sure if it will stay that way. Also with the power inside, I marked one side "flip down only" and the other "flip up only" so the wire doesn't end up twisted.

              I'm still trying to work out the DC for the sander. I need it today for a project that really needs to be completed by Thursday.

              ​​​​​​​

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              • #8
                Re: "flip down only"

                You could make a simple mod to make it flip one way and have to reverse, to protect your cord.

                You need a strong dowel pin (preferably two, on both sides ) Inserted in the side wall. Sticking out about an inch.
                At a height in the middle of the flipping platform.
                And set back from the edge of the wall to clear your locking mechanisms.

                Then you need a small recessed notch on your flipping platform to accept the dowel Four notches in all. Two on the same side of the top and two on the opposite side of the bottom. When the bottom is flipped the notch will engage. With tool A you can see the notches on the top, but when flipped to tool B the notches will engage from the bottom.
                So the notch will have to be deep as half the platform thickness plus half the dowel thickness.
                The dowel will keep it from going over on one direction then from going over in the opposite direction.

                Loring
                Loring in Katy, TX USA
                If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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                • #9
                  Good idea, I've kicked around a few thoughts like that. The notch would have to be quite deep, and I'm concerned about rigidity/strength loss. But it's definitely worth considering. A bolt could well be the pin also.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Carlos View Post
                    Good idea, I've kicked around a few thoughts like that. The notch would have to be quite deep, and I'm concerned about rigidity/strength loss. But it's definitely worth considering. A bolt could well be the pin also.
                    Your platform is three plies thick, I assume 3/4" plies.
                    Using a 3/4" dowel you could expose one inch.
                    You then need to drill a 7/8" flat bottom (Forstner) hole 1-1/2" deep centered 5/8" from the edge. THen chisel out a 7/8" wide groove around that hole leading to the edge of the platform..
                    Leaving 3/4" full ply thickness to stop the dowel. That should be enough unless you really slam it.

                    Loring in Katy, TX USA
                    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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                    • #11
                      The photos above show the construction. It's probably not a big deal to cut half way through one of those 1x2s that make up the structure. On the other hand, there's no reason just labeling it shouldn't be enough. Also, since the planer is offset, it wants to fall towards the side that should turn.

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