Router recommendations?

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  • Dedpedal
    Established Member
    • Feb 2020
    • 255
    • Palm Coast Florida
    • One BT3000 in use and one for parts. Plus a BT3100

    Router recommendations?

    I’m looking for a used or cheap new router that’s compatible with our BT accessory table. One that’s easy to raise and lower, with an on off switch instead of a trigger and anything else that helps.
  • LCHIEN
    Internet Fact Checker
    • Dec 2002
    • 20955
    • Katy, TX, USA.
    • BT3000 vintage 1999

    #2
    If I am remembering correctly, the accessory table has no router mounting holes. You were supposed to buy the router kit which has an aluminum plate - rectangular with two beveled corners. to mount the router and then the plate would be screwed to bosses in the underside of the auxilary table to mate the router to the table
    I think there were, over time, multiple versions of the plate, some blank, some with Ryobi router hole patterns and some with universal (multi) patterns.
    Click image for larger version

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    Of course it was no big deal to drill more holes in the blank or ryobi-only plates. Use the scuff plate of the router as a template for drilling.

    I mounted a craftsman router to a 1/4" plywood board with in place of the aluminum plate and some t-nuts in the plywood to mount the router.
    So what router you can use depends on what mounting plate you have or are willing to customize.

    I used an old craftsman router with 1/4" collet only for a couple of years... kept a roundover bit either 1/4" or 3/8" or a bevel bit to put nice edges on stuff, these were bearing bits so do not require a fence leaving the tablesaw clear to use. When not in use I just lowered the bit below the table to allow table saw work to clear it.

    routers with triggers always have locks so that's not a big problem, just lock it on and use a external tool switch.
    Really just about any router will work if you dedicate it to the table, given that the mounting is easily done.
    Consider
    • fixed vs variable speed
    • single or dual collet size
    • ease of adjusting height while under the table, altho the BT3 aux table is easily removable so you don't have to work from the bottom
    • Some routers offer above the table fine height adjustment. I know the later Bosch 1617 series have a penetration in the base to allow a T-handle allen wrench to adjust the height screw from above the table, very convenient!!!
    • Plunge vs non plunge... the plunge routers have springs to help balance the weight of the motor when using hand held, but which work against you when using mounted inverted in a table making it twice as hard to raise against both gravity and the force of the spring now working int he wrong direction. Advise avoiding plunge routers.
    Remember that if you use a router fence fixed to the BT3 rails, i.e. the rip fence, you will need the aux table rear lock to be installed because as provided it only locks at the front and will have some play at the back, possibly messing your fence guided cuts (but not with bearing bits)! I think the lock is part of the router kit.

    If you haven't, read the BT3FAQ linked in my sig line below it has a long section on routers for the BT3.

    P.S. is this a first or a second router? If its a second meant to be dedicated to its mount, then consider buying the same brand as your primary router to share parts and accessories. Otherwise I'd be tempted to go for price.

    My handheld router is a Bosch 1617EVS; the router permanently in my router table is a Bosch 1617 single speed with a $20 speed controller/switch. This worked out well since A) soft start not needed in a table B)variable speed control and power switch on the side, don't need to reach under table to operate.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 02-13-2024, 09:12 PM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • Dedpedal
      Dedpedal commented
      Editing a comment
      Good advice! This is for my new woodworking friend. She has the plate and screws already. I have a yard sale hitachi on mine that works well and I’m looking for a similar one but didn’t want to narrow my options. I’ll keep your information in mind. Thanks!
  • leehljp
    Just me
    • Dec 2002
    • 8435
    • Tunica, MS
    • BT3000/3100

    #3
    Along the lines of choosing a router in the manner that Loring wrote above, I wanted to post on one brand that is being totally phased out - Porter Cable. I have 4 PC routers and I have had two 690s for 30 plus years. The regular woodworking company buyouts and mergers through the years - have taken its toll on several brands.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

    Comment

    • LCHIEN
      Internet Fact Checker
      • Dec 2002
      • 20955
      • Katy, TX, USA.
      • BT3000 vintage 1999

      #4
      These may help you, info collected over the years.
      Attached Files
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

      Comment


      • Dedpedal
        Dedpedal commented
        Editing a comment
        This may help.
    • LCHIEN
      Internet Fact Checker
      • Dec 2002
      • 20955
      • Katy, TX, USA.
      • BT3000 vintage 1999

      #5
      does she have the universal plate with a lot of holes or the one just for Ryobi routers. If the latter its tempting to get a Ryobi router, but they are a mixed bag... I hear many the plastic has swollen and they don't vertically adjust very easily.
      Switch vs trigger, if its on the router both will be inconvenient to use when mounted in a table.
      If you are using a BT, unplug the saw plug on the side and use the saw switch and outlet to control the router is one solution that gives you a easily accessible safety shut off switch but a bit inconvenient swapping back and forth. Or you can buy a tool switch and outlet you can mount somewhere convenient.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

      Comment


      • Dedpedal
        Dedpedal commented
        Editing a comment
        Her husband is a metal worker and made her a copy of the plate I have for universal fit. I’m sure we will find her one used here soon.
    • Jim Frye
      Veteran Member
      • Dec 2002
      • 1051
      • Maumee, OH, USA.
      • Ryobi BT3000 & BT3100

      #6
      I have an ancient Ryobi R700 plunge router in an accessory table on my BT3000. It's been there since 1993. I made a mounting plate from 3/4" plywood to fit the router and the accessory table. There's an article on it in the articles section here.

      Jim Frye
      The Nut in the Cellar.
      ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

      Comment

      • dbhost
        Slow and steady
        • Apr 2008
        • 9215
        • League City, Texas
        • Ryobi BT3100

        #7
        I had a Ryobi 1/4" router years ago. It was okay, I upgraded to my Hitachi KM12VC fixed / plunge router kit with both 1/4 and 1/2 inch collets, and was able to use the adapter plate that came with my BT table. Mind you I bought my BT complete with accessories used from a former fellow member here. They technically are still members I am sure but they just are VERY inactive for the last decade or so... Not sure if they modded the plate to fit their router or not, but it worked perfectly. I opted for a more standard router insert on a shop made extension table later on, I like my setup now but the setup before worked well too...
        Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

        Comment

        • nikita6
          Handtools only
          • Feb 2024
          • 2

          #8
          Originally posted by dbhost
          I had a Ryobi 1/4" router years ago. It was okay, I upgraded to my Hitachi KM12VC fixed / plunge router kit with both 1/4 and 1/2 inch collets, and was able to use the adapter plate that came with my BT table. Mind you I bought my BT complete with accessories used from a former fellow member here. They technically are still members I am sure but they just are VERY inactive for the last decade or so... Not sure if they modded the plate to fit their router or not, but it worked perfectly. I opted for a more standard router insert on a shop made extension table later on, I like my setup now but the setup before worked well too...
          Your journey with routers reflects the evolution many of us experience. The Hitachi KM12VC sounds like a versatile upgrade, and adapting it for your BT table shows resourcefulness. It's fascinating how the community's contributions, even from less active members, continue to shape and enhance our woodworking experiences over time.

          Comment

          • nikita6
            Handtools only
            • Feb 2024
            • 2

            #9
            Consider the versatile Bosch 1617EVSPK, offering both fixed and plunge bases for diverse routing tasks. Alternatively, the compact yet powerful DeWalt DWP611PK excels in precision. Both are reliable choices, but the ideal router depends on your specific needs, whether for intricate details or robust tasks.



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