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  • bt 3000 motor replacement

    I have used my bt3000 for probably 15 years. I am trying to replace the motor. It seems like I will need to disassemble the blade height adjustment mechanism in order to get the old motor out. For the life of me, I can't seem to see how to get it apart. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. I love my bt3000. I am in a major project and don't want to have to pull the old Delta unisaw out of the corner; I much prefer the Ryobi. Thanks, Steve

  • #2
    take the left side cover off the main housing.
    Remove the blade and the blade shroud
    I think there's like four screws that hold a plate to the motor assembly, remove the screws and the shims will be exposed, the locker bracket and motor can be pulled off from the other side of the saw.

    THis is from memory, there's a number of articles and threads here on replacing the motor, belts and shims which have a lot in common.


    Here's an article showing how to service the shims... basically this also involves removing the motor assembly.
    http://www.bt3central.com/showthread.php?t=27266
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 05-19-2013, 01:37 AM. Reason: added link to shim repair article
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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    • #3
      To add to Loring's instructions: you'll find a few small screws (4 I think) that hold the two halves of the motor support assembly (the assembly with the shims and motor and blade guard support that moves up/down for blade elevation)... and even with those screws out part of the assembly won't seem to want to separate. The small side of the assembly (with the blade guard support) is a close-fit to the bearing that supports the arbor; it may take some tugging to pull the piece off the arbor bearings. Pull perfectly straight too; getting it cocked sideways will jam it into the bearing that much harder. Same for re-assembly: nice and straight. There is some small piece in the bearing area as well (a holder bracket) that can be "fun" to line up during re-assembly - watch for it as you take stuff apart and note how it goes.

      mpc

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      • #4
        bt3000 motor replacement

        I replaced the motor assembly in my bt3000 this weekend. By 'assembly', I mean the motor, including the threaded portion which receives the blade elevation shaft. I found that the two beveled elevation gears had to be separated in order to remove the shaft. I did this, starting from the front, taking off the elevation handle and the other components. The gear on the front, horizontal shaft has a machine screw that goes through the shaft and gear. Once the shaft is loose and the screw removed, you can take out this gear. You can then remove the vertical, threaded shaft from the motor housing.

        As they say, installation is the reverse of removal.

        I would rate this as fairly difficult, particularly if you are not familiar with the inner-workings of the bt3000. I had done a belt and shim replacement previously, but this is much more involved. It does, of course, include doing the shims and belts as you put it back together.

        Anyway, perhaps this will help someone if they are involved in a motor assembly replacement. Now, if I get another 15 years from my bt3000, it will have been worth it.

        Sincerely,
        Steve Wilkinson
        Johnson City, TN

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        • #5
          Steve,
          did you 15-year-old motor die of old age - worn out?
          or did you overload it.
          Where did you get your replacement motor? used, or from a parts dealer?

          Just curious.
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by stevew3217 View Post
            I am in a major project and don't want to have to pull the old Delta unisaw out of the corner; I much prefer the Ryobi. Steve
            Congratulations on the motor replacement, and bringing the BT back to life. What's wrong with your Unisaw?

            .

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            • #7
              Basically, the bearing were locking up. It could be fixed, of course, but I didn't want to try it at this time. I bought the motor assembly from ereplacements.com...fairly expensive but, hopefully, a decent investment to keep my favorite saw up and running.

              Steve

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              • #8
                Actually, the unisaw works fine; I just prefer the Ryobi. This Delta may not technically be a unisaw; it probably is a precursor to that. It is the old, cast-iron, model with the Art-Deco look on the name-plates, etc. It has a fairly nice Vega replacement rip fence. No dust collection; although, I have planned to try to add something for that. I added a small, fold-down extension for ripping and a side-table extension for more width. Still prefer the bt3000, especially for ripping; the Delta is powerful but clunky to me. The bt3000 was my first major purchase when I got into woodworking and, for me, you just can't beat the versatility and accuracy.

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                • #9
                  FWIW, maybe for the next guy comes along, the bearings are standard sizes and readily available. You do need to be able to pull the bearings and press new ones in place. I've never done it but heard others have.
                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stevew3217 View Post
                    The bt3000 was my first major purchase when I got into woodworking and, for me, you just can't beat the versatility and accuracy.
                    True, that was discussed in another thread recently. For anything short of factory production work, the BT3 is a great choice, and a number of us prefer them to our industrial "pro" saws.

                    I have a General and a Felder, but the BT3 is the one I use most. Just can't beat the accuracy and consistency.
                    --------------------------------------------------
                    Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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                    • #11
                      Can you post a picture of the Delta?

                      .

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                      • #12
                        I tried, but I could not seem to attach a picture. I noticed that my 'posting rules' indicate that I cannot add attachments.

                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Many thanks for the motor replacement guide, Steve. I have a similar problem with my BT3000 - bearings locking up. I went to replacementparts.com for the replacement motor assembly, and found a post that the motor assembly can be removed from the top of the lift shaft without disassembly of the elevation shaft gears? I tried this but couldn't figure a way to make it work. Has anyone tried this successfully?

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                          • #14
                            motor replacement from top

                            Thinking back on the motor replacement, it might be possible to do it from the 'top', without taking the elevation gears apart. The basic issue is that the vertical shaft is threaded through the motor assembly, so this shaft must be removed from the old assembly one way or the other in order to thread it into the new assembly. If you take the assembly loose from the saw table, you might then be able to turn the motor assembly off of the shaft. It's hard for me to visualize, but it might be possible. If so, it's probably better than the way I did it.

                            Best wishes and good luck,

                            Steve

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                            • #15
                              I know I'm replying to a six year old post, but I'm hoping to add information that might help someone else who's trying to replace the motor in a BT3000.

                              As SteveW says, the bevel gears must be separated before the motor can come out. I removed the gear on the vertical shaft. There's a nut and washer underneath the gear that must be removed. That's easy.

                              The issue is that the gears are held onto the shaft with a pin press-fitted through both the gear and the shaft. It is NOT a machine screw, at least on the two saws that I have access to. Initially, I thought these pins were Allen screws, but cleaning off the sawdust and grime revealed the pin. The pin is actually a tube that has a split down it's length, I think it's called a roll pin or a spring pin.

                              The problem is that the gear is located in a corner of the casting and there is not enough room to tap the pin through. I used an 8-penny finishing nail as a punch (head down) and tapped the pin out about 3/8 of an inch. Then I rotated the shaft 180 degrees and used a Dremel to cut off the protruding part of the pin. If you tap the pin out too far, it prevents the shaft from turning, so be careful and use a flashlight to check how far the pin protrudes. Then rotate the shaft back, tap the pin out again, and repeat the process until you can tap it all the way out. It took me three cuts, but I finally got it off.

                              Once the gear is loose, you can wiggle the motor free. The vertical shaft comes out with the motor. It's easy to separate it from the motor once the assembly is out.

                              By the way, you cannot "do it from the top" as the previous post speculates. The top of the vertical shaft has a nut on it that looks like it might unscrew, but it is an integral part of the shaft and *can't* be removed. Don't ask me how I know.

                              I hope this helps someone changing out their motor. Good luck.

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