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  • A few more questions, if you please

    Maybe these have been answered already, still here goes:

    1. I've got the stock saw, miter clamp, and a roller stand. How long a 2x4 can I safely crosscut? 5'? nearly 6'?

    2. What do the large wrench and small wrench do at each end? From the manual it looks like the slot on both of them fits the arbor shaft, then the other end of the large wrench fits the arbor nut and the small wrench fits the nuts for the blade guard? Seems like I'd want at least one to grip the arbor shaft, as standard end wrenches are too thick. But standard combination wrenches seem ok for the blade guard nuts and maybe the arbor nut too.

    3. Is it worth buying one of the miter slot featherboards and fastening it between the SMT and main saw table for ripping? Will a HF cheapsky work OK?

    TIA for your insights...

  • #2
    Originally posted by tjr View Post
    Maybe these have been answered already, still here goes:

    1. I've got the stock saw, miter clamp, and a roller stand. How long a 2x4 can I safely crosscut? 5'? nearly 6'?
    Depends on how well the stock is supported (you can add supports off either end of your saw), and how centered the cut is (the closer to center, the longer the piece you could cross cut). Six feet is not too long at all, depending on the above.

    Originally posted by tjr View Post
    2. What do the large wrench and small wrench do at each end? From the manual it looks like the slot on both of them fits the arbor shaft, then the other end of the large wrench fits the arbor nut and the small wrench fits the nuts for the blade guard? Seems like I'd want at least one to grip the arbor shaft, as standard end wrenches are too thick. But standard combination wrenches seem ok for the blade guard nuts and maybe the arbor nut too.
    Not sure I'm understanding your question, but when you're removing the blade, you use the slot end of the blade guard wrench to hold the arbor shaft still.
    Originally posted by tjr View Post
    3. Is it worth buying one of the miter slot featherboards and fastening it between the SMT and main saw table for ripping? Will a HF cheapsky work OK?
    There are all sorts of feather board options that you can find on this site. One thing that I try to avoid is applying too much sideways force on my SMT (that's the equal and opposite force that the FB applies to the stock). Otherwise, the sky's the limit.

    Regards,
    Tom

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    • #3
      I have crosscut a 12" 2x4 on mine, supported on sawhorses that were well waxed...
      Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

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      • #4
        For crosscutting, if you have two roller stands: Put the two stands to the left of the saw and place a board on them that is longer than the distance between the stands. Place one end of the 2x on the saw and the other end rests on the board on the rollers. As you move the board through the blade using the miter fence on the sliding miter table the other end will roll along on the rollers.

        Bill,

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Tom Miller View Post
          Not sure I'm understanding your question, but when you're removing the blade, you use the slot end of the blade guard wrench to hold the arbor shaft still.
          I guess I should have mentioned that I have neither large nor small wrench, so I'm trying to decide to buy one or the other or both.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tjr View Post
            I guess I should have mentioned that I have neither large nor small wrench, so I'm trying to decide to buy one or the other or both.
            Either wrench the slot will hold the arbor.
            The big wrench is 3/4" and the smaller one is i think 1/2" and standard open end or closed end wrenches will do OK, so you only need one Ryobi wrench to hold the arbor.

            cross cutting long boards is a matter of balance and support! You can cross cut a long board more easily in the center than 1 foot from the end but you need support in either case.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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            • #7
              The small box end wrench is for the blade guard/riving knife assembly. For blade removal, the open end of the small wrench is used to hold the arbor while the large wrench is used to remove the nut. I'd get both.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dbhost View Post
                I have crosscut a 12" 2x4 on mine, supported on sawhorses that were well waxed...
                Dang cross cutting a 12 inch long 2X4 must have been a real challenge. But the extra supports made it possible.

                I believe we have an incorrect symbol
                Often in error - Never in doubt

                Mike

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                • #9
                  I've been able to crosscut 4/4 11 " wide by 12' long birdseye maple. With one roller stand and wide table kit installed.

                  As others have said either wrench will be fine. Add both a 1/2" and 3/4" combo wrenches and you'll be set.

                  You can make a feather board that attaches directly to the SMT if you feel the need for a rip feather board. A better solution may be to either install a filler board on the left of the blade or buy and install a MST there. Then if you use a wood filler route a miter slot Or a T-slot to attach feather boards. The added benefit is you'll need a filler if and when you do bevel rips.
                  Donate to my Tour de Cure


                  marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

                  Head servant of the forum

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                  • #10
                    As usual, one more question: Why will I need a filler piece for bevel rips? Good ol' manual shows bevel ripping without extras - of course, who reads the manual?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tjr View Post
                      As usual, one more question: Why will I need a filler piece for bevel rips? Good ol' manual shows bevel ripping without extras - of course, who reads the manual?
                      This is a really good question. On right tilt table saws the safe way to bevel rip is to have the fence on the left side of the blade. The SMT base interferes with the placement of the rip fence and the Acc. table does not slide all the way over to the saws center section. Leaving a gap and hardly any stock support. If you install a filler piece then you'll have good stock support for any width rip on the left of the blade this also assumes that you make the throat plate level with the table.

                      All that said I do very few bevel rips and when I do I am only cutting large panels. I cut in the unsafe manner with the knowledge of the danger of an entrapment kickback is high to extreme. If I were to do many more I would attach a filler. In fact now that I have a planer I may just mill one up.
                      Donate to my Tour de Cure


                      marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

                      Head servant of the forum

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, obviously I didn't know about bevel ripping with fence on left. Makes a lot of sense in terms of pinching and kickback.

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