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  • Help with Ryobi table saw not staying on

    Hopefully this is appropriate for the forum. I have a near new Ryobi table saw (RTS23) that was only used in one session last week (without issues) for some cross cuts. When I fired it up this weekend, it would spin up to what sounded like full RPM with the On button held, but the motor shut off as soon as I let the button go. Intuition says I have a bad switch, but I squarely fall in the newbie category and wonder if there might be something else I'm missing. If it means anything, there's a sound like air being released as the blade comes to a stop, but I can't recall whether or not that was the case last weekend as well. I was looking to get something done this weekend and am hoping it doesn't come down to a choice between using the circular saw and waiting to sort it out with customer support.

  • #2
    I never heard of a table saw where you had to hold the button or switch on to keep it running. Only circular saws require that. And miter saws and hand held drills.
    Most stationary tools have a on and off switch, not a momentary switch.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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    • #3
      Yep, that’s precisely what I’m running into. It worked fine last week. The switch did require the button to be held until the motor reached operating speed, which I think is by design, but it could be released once the blade hit speed. Not so this week. Could very well be the switch, but I thought I’d see if I might be overlooking something else.

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      • #4
        I didn't think that saw had "button" style switches; instead I thought it has a paddle style switch that is turned ON by pulling the bottom outwards. A tap inwards shuts it back off. It's a simple electrical switch... not some fancy thing tied into the motor RPMs or anything. Looking at the downloadable manuals for the saw shows a simple paddle switch. Perhaps Ryobi changed something between when your saw was made and the current online manuals? They did completely replace the power switch design on the BT3000 saws - and there was a free swap-out of the original style to the newer/safer style. Send Ryobi's tech support folks an email with your saw model number, serial number, and purchase date.

        But there is absolutely no way you should have to hold the button to maintain the saw running. That'd be a safety hazard - keeping one hand on the switch rather than having both hands free to control the workpiece. High-end tools often have "magnetic" switches: when turned ON, an electromagnet is powered which holds the switch ON. If electrical power fails, the electromagnet stops which releases the switch back to the OFF position; that way the saw won't be ON when power is restored. Your switch is acting like a magnetic switch that has failed - the electromagnet that holds it ON isn't working. RTS series saws didn't have magnetic switches in the US... were they mandatory in other countries with more stringent safety regulations?

        mpc

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        • #5
          If it worked "correctly" last week and it doesn't now, its failed.
          A table saw should turn on and stay on.
          Usually they have a paddle safety switch you raise a lever to start it and pushing on the lever turns it off.Making starting a deliberate action and turning off quick and easy.
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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          • #6
            Thanks both for your input. On the heels of mpc's detailed info, which sounded like a description of how my switch likely works, I opened it up and searched for the actual part (vs. the minimal info on Ryobi's site). It is in fact a magnetic switch made by Kedu, and as mpc notes, the magnet likely failed. Disappointing considering the saw is practically new, but things happen. I'll get in touch with Ryobi's support.

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            • #7
              What is the Kedu model number? After reading your reply, I did a Google search on "Kedu magnetic switch" and found all sorts of hits including several switches available Amazon. I was a) surprised at how many there were, b) how many have yellow bodies similar to switches I've seen on several "non-high-end tools" so maybe they're more common than I thought, and c) they aren't horribly expensive.

              Quite a few have the big red OFF paddle and look like they'd be really good to use on router tables or other power tools... compared to Rockler's "Safety Power Tool Switch" for example. Rockler's switch is big - easy to turn off by hand or by bumping it with a knee if necessary - but Rockler's description specifically says it is not a magnetic switch. So, if the switch is ON and electrical power fails, the switch will stay ON once power is restored and whatever tool is controlled by this switch will thus turn ON again... I'm actually quite impressed your RTS23 has a magnetic switch! That's an "expensive" switch (compared to a non-magnetic style) for price sensitive entry-level tools.

              mpc

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              • #8
                It's 011713 though it doesn't seem like it's manufactured anymore and may have been superseded by the KJD17. That's a naive conclusion based on appearances. I'm pretty new to all this but can easily appreciate the benefit of good fortune of having a magnetic switch at this price point.

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                • #9
                  Hmmm, a sudden magnet failure seems as improbable as gravity failure. How likely is that?

                  Actually, that's not true, magnets can be quickly de-poled by intense heat (1390 F), strong magnetic fields and/or strong mechanical shock. But none seems likely in the protected confines of a switch in a benign location. Your saw wasn't hit by a meteorite recently, was it?
                  Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-08-2020, 12:44 AM.
                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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                  • #10
                    Science....https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V83JR2IoI8k
                    Harumpf!
                    GrumpyDad

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