Accu-Rip Circular saw guide

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  • Accu-Rip Circular saw guide

    Has anybody ever used one of these before and how good are they ? http://www.accurip.com/index.html My daugther and SIL purchased this for me a couple of years ago, and I've just decided to install it today . I think it would make ripping a 4x8 sheet of plywood easier than using a TS, as the Accu-Rip guide can be set up to rip 24". This is only a useful tool however if you have a straight edge to guide the fence with. Another nice feature I think is the fact that it can remain on the CS at all times, even when cross cutting. I'm just curious as to some of your opinions on this gadget. Although I haven't used it yet, I must admit I like the idea of it all as well as the quality material this thing seems to be made out of.
    Last edited by Raymonator; 05-06-2006, 01:02 PM.
    Measure twice....cut once.
    Happiness makes up in height what it lacks in length (Robert Frost)

  • #2
    I have a small rip fence guide (7") for my circular saw but rarely use it. The main thing that I don't like about the guide is the small surface area of the fence that rides along the edge. There is a tendency for the guide to either move away from the edge or jump off it. In general, I like to use a sawboard for ripping sheet goods. For narrow rip I use the table saw. The concept of the Accurip is good and the guide may be good but I see it as a gadget (not a must-have item).
    ________
    Park Royal 3 Condos Pattaya
    Last edited by newbie2wood; 09-15-2011, 06:04 AM.

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    • #3
      Yes I agree, I have the a 7" rip fence that came with my CS as well, and never really cared for it too much. I just came in from my work shop, set up the Accu-Rip rip fence to my CS and after a few adjustments and test cuts, I ripped a 4x8 sheet of 5/8" plywood, ripping 19 3/16 that I needed along the entire length of the sheet. I have to admit that it did a very precise job and was less cumbersome than using a TS. The fact that CS's were mainly designed to use on rough cuts, I find this Accu-Rip makes the CS a tad more useful for semi-precision cuts. I'm not saying that the Accu-Rip is as precise as a good TS, but none the less, it allowed my CS to be extremely accurate all the way through with no jagged edges giving me 19 3/16" precisely at both ends of the sheet. The trick is to go slow and steady. So far, I'm impressed !
      Last edited by Raymonator; 05-06-2006, 01:05 PM.
      Measure twice....cut once.
      Happiness makes up in height what it lacks in length (Robert Frost)

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      • #4
        Ray,
        I have the same one except it is the Mastercraft branded unit.
        You just have to be very careful as you probably noticed, to not let the saw get ahead of the end guide or your cut will go awry.
        It didn't fit my Skil very good and I haven't tried it on my new PC Mag saw yet. Might save me from trying to find an 8 ft straight edge though.
        Brian

        Welcome to the school of life
        Where corporal punishment is alive and well.

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        • #5
          It doesn't look very effective to me, unlike a rip fence on a table saw or a sawboard like device, the guide is too short to keep the saw from racking and getting off the line if you let the saw get ahead of or behind the guide a little. It's really no better than drawing a cut line and following it.
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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          • #6
            Brian
            I have the Mastercraft Accu-Rip as well, and my CS is a Skill 25th Anniversary edition. I had to remove the wing nut of the CS that holds the 7" fence, but after that, it fit fine. I think if you go slow and like you say, don't let the saw get ahead of the fence or guide, it works very well.

            LCHIEN
            I have cut several times trying to keep the blade to a scribed line when using my CS, and it never comes out 100%, no matter how slow I go. Maybe it's just a lack of talent on my part. Like I said before, I don't think this gizmo is a miracle tool, but to me, for certain long board ripping with a straight edge, it cuts quite accurately.
            Measure twice....cut once.
            Happiness makes up in height what it lacks in length (Robert Frost)

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            • #7
              I've had one for a couple of years now and have used it extensively in cutting panels from ply sheets. It provides more than enough precision for such tasks. I don't totally agree with Sears' claim that it allows for effortless crosscutting without it being removed, since you typically have to slide the little fence component off and because it still creates a "riser" on the bottom-front of the shoe. That said, it's more than paid for itself several times over in the time it's saved me.

              Most recently, I used the unit to rip some laminated pieces of fiber cement trim (5/16" thickness-by-7.25"W glued to 7/16" thickness-by-5.5"W) that I built up to replace the deteriorating pine fascia on my house. Worked well for that, too.

              BTW: For those interesting in buying one of these rip guides, I recently noticed this exact unit sold under a different brand name at Lowe's for $40.
              Jon - From inside the artillery fan near Fort Bragg, NC

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              • #8
                I saw the Canadian Tire MasterCraft version (like I have) on sale for $29.00 CAD.
                I agree with you Jon that it does have a purpose for that cut where it's not crucial to have 100% accuracy, although it does just that if you take your time and move the saw smoothly over a sheet or piece of wood that has a perfect straight edge. The one thing that bothers me a bit as well is their claim that says you can leave it on at all times for cross cutting due to the riser effect you mentioned. To me this isn't really a big deal, because if I really want a precise cross cut, I can either use my CMS or the SMT. I usually only use my CS for rough ripping anyway or when working with large sheets. For that purpose, it's just nice to know that I can make an accurate cut with this thing, with less effort and danger than using a TS.
                Measure twice....cut once.
                Happiness makes up in height what it lacks in length (Robert Frost)

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                • #9
                  I have the version called the "Ripmaster". It works very well except that you have to be very careful at the end of the cut as you lose our edge guide in the last few inches. The only downside is the 24" limitation.
                  http://www.wreckwriter.com/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wreckwriter
                    I have the version called the "Ripmaster". It works very well except that you have to be very careful at the end of the cut as you lose our edge guide in the last few inches. The only downside is the 24" limitation.
                    Maybe the MasterCraft version is different, as I can go right to the end of my cut without the small fence losing contact with the edge or being ahead of the blade. It stays parallel to the blade at all times.
                    As far as having a longer guide, can you imagine what a pain it would be if the scale went to 48" or so? You'd probably want to take it off in no time. I find the 24" scale long enough and takes a little getting use to having it there permanent.
                    Measure twice....cut once.
                    Happiness makes up in height what it lacks in length (Robert Frost)

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