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today's project sandpaper cutter

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  • today's project sandpaper cutter

    I built a (probably) over-designed sandpaper cutter.
    Saw one somewhere that used a hacksaw blade as the cutter.
    Routed some T-slots for the guide - new to me, was easy with a Woodline 1291-5 bit which is .468" wide and just the right size for a 7/16 hex head on a 1/4-20 bolt. The cutting height was .150 so i had to lower the bit .040 and make a second pass for the .190 depth to easily pass the hex head thickness. I pre-routed a 5/16th slot.

    Tiny .050" (a little less than 1/16") deep dadoes with the table saw blade added a professional looking 1" x 1" grid to the top for very little added time effort.

    And then cut a bunch of sheets for my sanding blocks whose paper was worn but I've been too lazy to cut the paper.

    My blocks take 9x2-3/4" paper which is a standard 11x9 sheet cut into fourths on the 11" dimension.

    P.S. This morning I took off the blue tape marking frequently used positions and cut notches in the top bar which I then marked with a Brother P-touch. Looks more finished.

    P.P.S. the four "frequent" positions correspond to 11"/2, 9"/2, 11"/3 and 11"/4. NO reasons others couldn't be marked if you use them.

    Click on the image thumbnails below to view full size.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 05-13-2021, 03:03 AM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

  • #2
    Looks great, hope you find it as useful as we have ours.
    DP
    www.wardprobst.com

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    • #3
      Lee says just buy one from Rockler:
      http://www.sawdustzone.org/showthrea...ot-power-tool)

      Brings back memories, still have and use mine. Oh, I think yours is a lot more compact than mine.

      Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
      Last edited by LCHIEN; 01-11-2016, 02:10 AM.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
        Brings back memories, still have and use it. Oh, I think yours is a lot more compact than mine.

        Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
        Rocker's in more compact, but yours has that "I'm going to make everyone envious" look! After I got mine, I had a faint memory of a sandpaper cutter discussion on this forum and looked it up. Then a big sigh!

        I used mine once yesterday. Worked fine, but I did not take the time to mount it. I will do that this afternoon probably.
        Hank Lee

        Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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        • #5
          another handy shop made tool
          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

          Comment


          • #6
            Loring: Nicely done! I'm really, really embarrassed that my sandpaper cutter is a cast off kitchen carving knife. On the upside, mine takes less storage space.
            Jim Frye
            The Nut in the Cellar.
            ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

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            • #7
              Jim, that's not the worst option. i use a nail to cut sandpaper)

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              • #8
                Some cut by pulling down, as Lchien's does. Some cut by lifting up the sandpaper against a horizontal hacksaw blade. Have any of you seen an advantage to one over the other?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Feemphynead View Post
                  Jim, that's not the worst option. i use a nail to cut sandpaper)
                  I liked the article. For 99% of woodworking, it is right on. But with any basically specific or generalized article, it misses a few things out on the fringe.

                  "If you are thinking of investing in mega fine sandpaper grit such as 1000 or more, there is no point in using them when woodcarving or woodworking. These thin single-use sheets are most effective if you wish to polish a waxed, painted wood that has been dusty and needs a refreshment. But overall, these are hardly ever used in a woodworking workshop."

                  The 1000 grit and higher are very often used on wood in pen making where measurements are regularly checked for dimensional sizing of .005 or better in tolerance. Of course those are used by most pen turners on the hard finish side, but quite a few like the bare wood feel with wax rubbed in. The 1000 grit and (not sure of the size .5micron) are used directly on dense oily shiny ebony woods, as well as other extremely fine and dense woods, to bring out the luster of the wood itself. Many wood pen blanks are stabilized with a polymer type of liquid in both vacuum chambers and sometimes followed up with pressure. The wood grain is impregnated and even these grainy & large capillary woods give a dense wood look. These too, can benefit from 1000+ grit sandpaper.

                  A few learned from the woodworking side that they could use clear shellac as a great primer and this works great on pens also, to be followed up with a hard clear finish, polished to a glass like shine.

                  I probably have 50+ sheets of 1000 or higher in my shop.

                  MicroMesh which uses a different numbering system is a rubbery cloth infused sanding/polishing material is/was used on many helicopters' polycarbonate/Lexan type of windshields to polish the scratches out caused by swirling dust created by the rotor wash at ground level. Micromesh is used probably 5 to 1 over other sanding and polishing materials or sheets in most pen turning circles.
                  Hank Lee

                  Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Boxturtle View Post
                    Some cut by pulling down, as Lchien's does. Some cut by lifting up the sandpaper against a horizontal hacksaw blade. Have any of you seen an advantage to one over the other?
                    I feel qualified to answer that.

                    With the cutting edge up as I made it, it is cleaner and easier to position the paper without threading it underneath a fixed blade. You don't need an extra set of hardware to suspend the blade. You can see how its easy to affix to the edge of the paper measuring and positioning support. And finally, you can clearly see the paper as its being cut to make sure it goes as planned.

                    The difference is in pulling the paper to cut it. Pulling up you have as much room as you need. Pulling down you can hit the table top if you are working on a table. That's why it has the legs underneath it to raise it high enough you can pull down. For heavy/thick papers in which you have to pull hard and risk hitting your hand on the table.just position the cutter at the table's edge.
                    Last edited by LCHIEN; 06-05-2021, 11:52 PM.
                    Loring in Katy, TX USA
                    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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