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A few Projects done during my absence

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  • #16
    Beautiful work on all of them, Jerry!
    Don, aka Pappy,

    Wise men talk because they have something to say,
    Fools because they have to say something.
    Plato

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    • #17
      All very nicely done. I love the pecan cabinet, seems very Krenov to me.
      Keith Z. Leonard
      Go Steelers!

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      • #18
        Wow! That is some super nice stuff you have there. It was impossible for me to pick a favorite.
        Larry R. Rogers
        The Samurai Wood Butcher
        http://splash54.multiply.com
        http://community.webshots.com/user/splash54

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        • #19
          Originally posted by drumpriest View Post
          All very nicely done. I love the pecan cabinet, seems very Krenov to me.
          In one of his books, Krenov said that he often would find a nice piece of wood that screamed out to him that it needed to be a door or pair of doors. So he would make the door(s) then design a piece around the doors. That is how that cabinet came about.

          The piece of wood was a bit thicker than typical 4/4 stuff, but not thick enough to resaw to bookmatch. And the figure did scream out to be displayed, so the extra thickness allowed for the coopering.
          Jerry

          \"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.\"
          ~ Thomas Paine ~





          http://www.sawdustersplace.com

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          • #20
            You sure have been busy! GREAT work! Beautiful too!
            Hank Lee

            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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            • #21
              Nice work jerry, obviously you have been very busy. I am intrigued by the miter dovetails. Never seen that before. That looks like too much work for no one to know though!! I want to try steam bending too, but need a project. The lamination on that skirt is what I'm looking for. Any quick and dirty details or pointers on that?

              Todd

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              • #22
                Very nice work, Jerry. Wow. Makes me want to sell my tools and take up stamp collecting.

                Not really, I'm just impressed and estimating how long it will take to get my skills up to the same level, if ever.

                g.
                "Be excellent to each other."
                Bill & Ted

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                • #23
                  Todd,
                  For pieces that you need a more exacting bend, the lamination method is best. You don't get the spring-back you get with steam bending. Drawback is that if the edges of the piece are seen, it is real tough to keep the plies un-noticeable. To that end, depending on the wood, the length of the piece to be bent, and the amount of bend needed, try to minimize the number of plies by cutting them thicker. I think I made three 1/4" thick slices to make the skirt on that.

                  When I made this piece:


                  I learned the hard way that if you're going to need to make two or more matching bent lams, it is best to make a wider form and cut your slices to a bit more than double (or triple) the final width and to make the matching pieces as one, then slice it apart. I had to go to a lot of extra work getting the pieces to match due to slightly different placement on the form.

                  Steam bending requires lots of patience and steam. It is mostly heat that softens the wood making it pliable. Our water here apparently has lots of metal ions in it, and apparently some of them escaped in the steam as I had to sand quite a bit of black off of areas of the white oak that had reacted to the metal and become ebonized.

                  While steam bending was interesting and likely the only method in some cases, the lamination method gives better results.
                  Jerry

                  \"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.\"
                  ~ Thomas Paine ~





                  http://www.sawdustersplace.com

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                  • #24
                    Thanks Jerry. I didn't know that I could get away with about 3 lams on a table skirt. That helps me out. Funny thing, I forgot, but I actually made a lamination long ago at the beginning of my woodworking. I needed a piece of 1 inch quarter round molding to go around the base of my staircase (old house, was carpeted, carpet removed, i.e. no baseboard trim). Worked pretty well too. I think I used about 8 thin slices. It had to be a big "C" shape. Wasn't too bad till I needed a big roundover bit that I didn't have. Found a local guy with a little cabinet buisiness to run it for me. The idea of doing a single glue up for identical pieces is a good one. Hopefully I'll remember that when I need to. Thanks again, and that piece looks great too!!

                    Todd

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