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  • BT3000 problems

    Owned my BT3000 for several years now and it developed a problem that I can't ignore. The blade no longer raises and lowers. Internet searches led me to here, which led me to discover that problems with the shims and on/off switch we're not unique to me. Several conversations with Ryobi led me to getting a new switch to install (hopefully this one works as it should). I've also gleaned from posts several years ago that I missed out on a warranty to fix the shim issue and I now have to pay for that myself? To make a short story long, I ordered and received new shims, guide holder, and motor bracket. Is anyone here aware of any links that will help guide me through the disassembly/reassembly process to install these parts. I have the saw pretty much broken down but am stuck on removing the vertical shaft that raises and lowers the blade. Paid good money for the saw, it gets intermittent use, but I'd like to keep it running.

    The problems with the warranty and safety concerns, well that's a story for another day.

    Thanks,
    Jp

  • #2
    You should not need to remove the elevation screw to replace/ update the shims. I would be surprised that you would need the motor bracket.

    Step by step directions for the old style shims is here.

    Step by step for upgrading to the new style shims is here.

    Old is flat (see pics in links) new is wavy or don't look like the flat ones.

    If you get stuck reply to post with a specific question or problem and I'm sure we can walk you through it.
    Donate to my Tour de Cure


    marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

    Head servant of the forum

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    • #3
      there was never a warranty repair/recall for shims.
      The secret to long lasting shims is cleanliness and lubrication. I use a Dust collector, some use a shop vac on the saw - at least the port in the back, mine the whole saw case.
      As for lubrication a dry lube - I use pure Johnson's paste wax (usually found in supermarkets and hardware stores in the floor care products section). Put it where the shims ride, top and bottom raise and lower the blade to get to top and bottom.
      ;
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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      • #4
        There's a link posted in a reply to a thread I started earlier tonight about motor replacement that covers everything you have to do. You don't need to remove the elevation screw to access the shims. I was replacing the motor, and I was able to do that by taking the nut off the top, angling the motor/arbor, and then elevating it right off the top of the screw. But you shouldn't need that for shim work.

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        • #5
          It appears as if I let my frustration get the better of me in my initial post. Not only was I not very clear but my tone was not what it should have been on this forum. For that, I apologize.

          With that said, let me start from the beginning. The initial problem with my BT3000 was the saw's inability to raise or lower the blade. I broke the saw down as far as I felt comfortable and was able to see that the threaded portion on the motor bracket that allows the vertical rod to raise and lower the blade had stripped. After contacting Ryobi, I was told that I needed to order a new motor bracket, guide holder and shims. The thinking was that while I was fixing the stripped motor bracket, I might as well upgrade the shims. So far I've managed to remove the guide holder, but am stumped on what to do to remove the motor to swap out the motor bracket. The links that have been provided do a good job showing the shim replacement procedure, but, unless I'm missing something, I don't see how to remove the threaded rod.

          Thanks again,
          Jpleech

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          • #6
            I've not done what you are asking. In person I would be able to figure it out. That said a better repair once you do get it apart is to install a helicoil in the original motor bracket.
            Donate to my Tour de Cure


            marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

            Head servant of the forum

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            • #7
              So all you are trying to do is get the motor off of the rod, correct? There is a bolt that threads into the top of the rod. Remove this, and the bushing above the motor. Then you can thread the motor off the top of the rod by spinning the rod (angling to a non-90-degree motor position helps here).

              The bigger question is how did you strip the rod? Did you really force it with jammed shims?

              Comment


              • #8
                Send me a PM. Your mailbox is full. I have your parts.

                J.D.
                You might think I haven't contributed much to the world, but a large number
                of the warning labels on tools can be traced back to things I've done...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't think there was one event that caused the problem. The mechanism has been stiff to turn at times, but I thought I'd been careful with keeping it cleaned and lubed. The day that it happened, I was making a simple rip cut and the blade just dropped. Yes it was rather scary. Needless to say I'm real curious to finally get this apart and see the extent to which it's stripped. Will try to get it disassembled this afternoon.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Black wallnut View Post
                    That said a better repair once you do get it apart is to install a helicoil in the original motor bracket.
                    There was a time I would heartily agree with this. M-and-D.com currently lists the motor bracket for a BT3000 for $26.31. Cost of the helicoil kit and time favor replacing the motor bracket.

                    True, if done right, the helicoil repair should be a permanent fix. My personal experience doing both is that replacing the motor bracket is easier and less stressful.
                    Brian

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                    • #11
                      Steel screw on aluminum bracket was not the finest design ever but cost effective.
                      Steel always wins but usually there has to be a bad load for that to happen and so often the failure of the bracket being stripped is that the shims have gone bad (or just gone) and the user keeps forcing the elevation mechanism even though its gone stiff.

                      The BT3 is not a heavy duty saw, its a versatile and accurate saw but the user needs to listen to it carefully and not force anything... if you force it it will break. It does need care.
                      Loring in Katy, TX USA
                      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Brian G View Post
                        True, if done right, the helicoil repair should be a permanent fix.
                        Found this link for thread repair for reference on the various options:
                        http://www.repairengineering.com/thread-repair.html

                        Having used both helicoils and Time-sert inserts to repair these mechanisms, the Time-sert is a much better solution in my opinion. A helicoil is like a spring and forms the thread out of a coil of shaped wire. The Time-sert is a complete new thread cut into a cylinder, with a larger thread on the outside. The Time-sert provides a complete steel bearing surface for the thread and will not wear as much. In addition, the threads won't work against the aluminum casting and eventually wear loose like a helicoil.

                        Next time around, though, I'll try the epoxy repair - a bit of Jeld-weld in the hole could be a nearly permanent fix, without having to disassemble the saw.
                        --------------------------------------------------
                        Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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                        • #13
                          BT300 shim fix

                          Alas, the shims on my BT3000 are shot. Where is a good source for the replacement parts? Ryobi suggested Gardner, but I could not find the parts on their site.

                          Also, is there an interim fix while I am waiting to get the new parts? I have some adhesive backed "Slick Tape" which is a "self lubricating UHMW tape". Could it serve as a buffer between the aluminum parts instead of the stainless steel shim?

                          I am in the process of resawing a bunch of cedar which generates a very fine dust which unfortunately just gums up on the Molykote metal assembly paste that I have used to lubricate the shims.

                          Any suggestions/tips are greatly appreciated!
                          Les

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                          • #14
                            Do you still have the shims? Did you follow the link in my article for shim supports?
                            Donate to my Tour de Cure


                            marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

                            Head servant of the forum

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by woodturner View Post
                              Found this link for thread repair for reference on the various options:
                              http://www.repairengineering.com/thread-repair.html

                              Having used both helicoils and Time-sert inserts to repair these mechanisms, the Time-sert is a much better solution in my opinion. A helicoil is like a spring and forms the thread out of a coil of shaped wire. The Time-sert is a complete new thread cut into a cylinder, with a larger thread on the outside. The Time-sert provides a complete steel bearing surface for the thread and will not wear as much. In addition, the threads won't work against the aluminum casting and eventually wear loose like a helicoil.

                              Next time around, though, I'll try the epoxy repair - a bit of Jeld-weld in the hole could be a nearly permanent fix, without having to disassemble the saw.
                              Not going to argue that helicoil is better however it is more available. FWIW I have yet to read of anyone who has used the helicoil repair and later had issues with it.
                              Donate to my Tour de Cure


                              marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

                              Head servant of the forum

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