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Looking for Fence parts or Fence replacement.

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  • Looking for Fence parts or Fence replacement.

    Looks like my beloved table saw is finally beginning to show some signs of wear after years of moderate use.

    The rolling wheel on the non handle side of the fence has come loose. Looks like there was a pin holding it and acting like an axle. I can now longer easily slide the fence and often it doesn't lock parallel with the blade.

    Is there a good place to find a replacement pin or even a replacement fence. (new or used)

    Thanks in advance and nice to see this little forum still alive. I came across it years ago when I was in the market for a table saw and have learned a great deal from just lurking and reading the posts.

  • #2
    Fence part

    The pin that you are missing is a commonly available "split-pin" available from any well stocked local hardware store. Take your roller with you to determine the o.d.size of the split pin. Hope this helps!
    Fred

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    • #3
      Originally posted by luteman View Post
      The pin that you are missing is a commonly available "split-pin" available from any well stocked local hardware store. Take your roller with you to determine the o.d.size of the split pin. Hope this helps!
      Fred
      i pretty sure that's correct.
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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      • #4
        I think it was originally a dowel pin, but should have been a roll pin. Roll pins are oversize a bit to hold press so they don't fall out. Dowel pins are used where tolerances are extremely close. There isn't a lot of those kind of tolerances in the fence. I have had then just fall out, but fortunately saw it happen. I just used a drop of "Locktite" on it. You won't need anything with a roll pin.
        Lee

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        • #5
          Yes it is a dowel pin. If you replace it with a roll pin I doubt the wheel will roll along the rear rail. I think the roll pin Loring is thinking about is the one that holds the rear clamper.
          Donate to my Tour de Cure


          marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

          Head servant of the forum

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          • #6
            I admit to being confused, a normal state.
            Please refer to the parts diagram attached for the rip fence (I got this from Sears Parts direct)

            Part #14 is a split roll pin and holds the clamper. Roll pins of various diameters are available in the hardware dept. of hardware stores.

            Part #23 (and this is the one I think you are talking about that holds the rolling wheel) is a dowel pin - a solid pin. You should be able to get a pin of identical diameter (1/4" I'm guessing) at a hardware store, if not go to the hardware department and buy an aluminum or steel rod of the right diameter and cut to length with a hacksaw.

            I don't think much more than friction holds the dowel pin in place. You might want to improve on that if your has fallen out. Make sure that the wheel can still roll though!

            Hope that helps and clears up the confiusion.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by LCHIEN; 07-28-2013, 04:33 PM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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            • #7
              Yep. I was confused as well. Only been about 10 years since I had to mess with it though.
              Lee

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              • #8
                Another source if the hardware store doesn't have right-sized metal rods: bolts. Carriage bolts or other screws with smooth shank sections can be cut. Might be less expensive than a metal rod too.

                Freezing the pin/rod will make the press-fit easier.

                mpc

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                • #9
                  As a preventive measure would it benefit the OP (and the rest of us) to pean the ends of the pin with a center punch to secure or is loctite sufficient?
                  Bill in Buena Park

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                  • #10
                    The loctite has proven effective in my case.
                    Just a tiny bit applied to one side only.
                    A dab of super glue would probably work just as well.
                    Lee

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                    • #11
                      Since the part that holds the pin is made of plastic. Peening may break the plastic. I think Lee has the answer. FWIW I've not had mine come out. I have had it gum up with sawdust before so that it stopped rolling. Cleaned with mineral spirits and then good to go.
                      Donate to my Tour de Cure


                      marK in WA and Ryobi Fanatic Association State President

                      Head servant of the forum

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