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What to check on the BT3x00 15 amp motor.

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  • What to check on the BT3x00 15 amp motor.

    Okay guys and gals... The occasional act ups are now regular. I need to fix whatever it is going on with my BT3100 motor...

    The symptoms?

    The motor will get up to full speed, but loaded, or not, the motor will slow down and stop. A reasonable "thump" or two to the table brings it back to life and it runs fine...

    I suspect that I either have the motor packed with sawdust, brushes going back, OR bad contacts in the motor...

    Now mind you, getting that big extension table off of the rails is no picnic. I have been putting it off for a while for good reason...

    So I want to be completely certain before I pull this thing apart, that I know exactly what I am doing with it...

    Any suggestions for what and how to inspect, clean, and if needed lubricate the motor? I do have new brushes, springs, and brush caps waiting to be installed, as well as a new switch.
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  • #2
    I'm not sure if Ryobi did it on the BT3XX, but I know that on the smaller cheaper saws they installed the cheapest possible bearings they could buy.

    After looking around, I found this for the BT3100 motor. I cross referenced the bearings Ryobi shows. Here is an example:
    The 969235003 is a bearing Erepalcements wants $8.62 for.
    A better bearing 6003ZZ is shielded on both sides, the original isn't shielded at all. Another choice is the 60032RS which is sealed on both sides. Either one is $1.87 at http://www.skatebearings.com/6003-2RS-6003-ZZ.htm
    There are also choices with much less runout and better ball bearings and races.

    Good Luck!

    DF
    Last edited by Dal300; 01-18-2012, 06:33 PM.

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    • #3
      No worries. I do have a good working spare motor, I just wanted to keep my original working as long as I could...
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      • #4
        I used a 1hp capactor start induction motor on my last table saw. The air gaps in the core would fill up with sawdust and have to be blown out occasionally. I don't know if this affects universal motors or not. It seems like it could. The induction motor would initially run if you gave it a spin first and eventually just wouldn't run.

        Jim

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        • #5
          what to check on BT3x00 15 amp motor....

          I'm not positive here, but it sounds as if you have electrical problems. Most likely, it is a bad on/off switch or wire connected to the switch.
          They could be loose on the switch or corroded connections or bad wires.
          I would check these before attempting any motor related issues that you
          may be thinking about. Usually when these type of problems develop, it is
          generally something small and simple that fouls up the works instead
          something more complicated.

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          • #6
            Take the side panel off the BT - the side panel with the electrical outlet. Then start the saw and let it run and slow/stop again. Instead of thumping the whole table/saw, try more gentle taps on the switch, outlet, and the motor itself. See if you can localize the flaky connection.

            I wouldn't be surprised though to hear the brushes are worn down to the point where the springs behind them aren't compressed enough to generate solid contact force.

            mpc

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mpc View Post
              Take the side panel off the BT - the side panel with the electrical outlet. Then start the saw and let it run and slow/stop again. Instead of thumping the whole table/saw, try more gentle taps on the switch, outlet, and the motor itself. See if you can localize the flaky connection.

              I wouldn't be surprised though to hear the brushes are worn down to the point where the springs behind them aren't compressed enough to generate solid contact force.

              mpc
              That is something I know I need to do, but don't want to... The wide table top gets in the way, and it's a bear to remove / install...
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              • #8
                What about loosening the levers that clamp the rails to the BT3's main body? Then you can slide the rails, any extension rails, extra table top, etc. off as one giant piece instead of trying to disassemble it at the rail joints. You'd probably need a helper for the weight or to hold the BT still... but it's a lot less work to re-assemble this way.

                mpc

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                • #9
                  I was mulling this over last night. And came up with the same idea, just slide the rails... Great minds think alike I guess...

                  FWIW, the original owner of my saw relocated the switch to the left side under the rail. I redid it externally and I am certain the issue isn't at the switch unless it is internal to the switch (although tapping / rapping on the switch doesn't have any effect). It is possible that it may be where the wires are joined. I think he used crimp connectors. Not sure... If nothing else, I may take them apart, clean them up real good, and make sure everything is nice and tight, and sealed...

                  As old as the saw is, and as heavily used, worn brushes would not be a surprise...
                  Last edited by dbhost; 01-19-2012, 11:10 AM.
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