Hammer Project (not woodworking)

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  • Hammer Project (not woodworking)

    It's head and handle are 6061 T6 aluminum. The faces are soft plastic. The bronze colored face in the pics is a bronze face attached to a plastic mount.


    The handle is knurled with the points cut off so it provides a good grip but isn't sharp in your hand. The handle is also counter-bored for light weight and stiffness.


    The faces were purchased from Mcmaster-carr. They screw in so I can replace them easily with any type I'd like (hard, soft, steel, bronze, etc). Notice the tapered counter-bore, that takes the load off of the screw and transfers it to the head so you don't break the screw off with a glancing blow.


    So far I've found it's good for gunsmithing work. I'd like to make a smaller one 3/4" in diameter.
    Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. - Thomas Edison

  • #2
    Nicely done, wood or not doesn't matter.
    ==========
    ". . . and only the stump, or fishy part of him remained."
    Green Gables: A Contemplative Companion to Fujino Township

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    • #3
      nice project, I picked up an old craftsman 109 last summer and have just started turning metal chips, I did some metal lathe work back about 25 years but none since. My son has a machinist and when Ii screw up he loves to let dad know what he did wrong!!!!!!! Most of my shop times purpose has to do with grandkids etc. anyway.
      Art

      If you don't want to know, Don't ask

      If I could come back as anyone one in history, It would be the man I could have been and wasn't....

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      • #4
        Cool.

        I know nothing about turning wood and even less about turning metal.

        How does the handle attach to the head? Does it screw in?

        How do you do the knurls? Is there a special tool for that?

        What does it weigh? I'm trying to get a sense for the scale of it. Is the
        knurling just a little longer than the width of your palm?

        Thanks,
        Paul

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        • #5
          That's really Slick Tom.... (insert groan here)

          Nice work and useful too, could make a nice dead blow that way too.


          Bill
          over here in the monsoon

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          • #6
            The work of a craftsman is to be admired whether it is wood, metal or whatever!
            Larry R. Rogers
            The Samurai Wood Butcher
            http://splash54.multiply.com
            http://community.webshots.com/user/splash54

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            • #7
              Thanks for the kind comments!

              Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
              Cool.

              I know nothing about turning wood and even less about turning metal.

              How does the handle attach to the head? Does it screw in?

              How do you do the knurls? Is there a special tool for that?

              What does it weigh? I'm trying to get a sense for the scale of it. Is the
              knurling just a little longer than the width of your palm?

              Thanks,
              Paul
              In some ways turning metal is easier than wood. You have precise measurements for every move you make with metal.

              The handle screws into the head and has threadlocker on it.

              Knurling is done with a knurling tool that looks like this:
              www.mcmaster.com
              The wheels are in pairs for that correspond to how fine or course you want them. The wheels are pressed firmly against the part while it's spinning and it displaces the material. It's fairly simple to do once it's demonstrated.
              here's a video
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTmv_kYimrI

              The knurling is about 4" long the hammer overall is about 12" and the faces are about 1.5".

              I don't know what it weighs, maybe 1lb.
              Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. - Thomas Edison

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              • #8
                Very nice Tom.. I bet it would work as a mallet also. I have gone through resurfacing and building new one's for a long time. The replace-able faces make that one quite attractive. Could ya send me one with soft face on one side and dead-blow on the other? haha...

                Well done...

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                • #9
                  That is really cool, Tom! Very nice work.
                  I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tom Slick View Post
                    It's fairly simple to do once it's demonstrated.
                    here's a video
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTmv_kYimrI
                    I see that metal turning has just as slippery a slope as wood turning. That's a
                    pretty cool tool. I was expecting slightly more manly music in the video but at
                    least I know how it's done now.

                    Thanks,
                    Paul

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