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  • Another Rip Fence Question

    Hello, first post here. I've absorbed a lot of this forum in the last couple days and between searches and the FAQ I seem to have found most of what I need. So thanks for setting up a good forum.

    Purchased recently for $100 , she's a little beat up. Pretty certain its the plastic guides @ the front locking clamp and the rear roller causing my rip fence issues but I'd love confirmation from the experts....video and pics attached.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk


  • #2
    Did you try turning the adjusting screw at the rear locking clamp?

    Is the roller cam facing the right direction? Thereís a little rubber (?) insert in the side of the roller and it should face a certain direction or it wonít tighten. The diagram in the manual should verify the direction.

    Ive got a couple of rip fences that donít lock properly - I think they need some tweaking.

    Lee

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    • #3
      I've reversed it now just to check. Close to tight but nowhere close to where it should be.

      Think I'm going to try replacing clamper A & b, plus anymore of the rear roller I can get ahold of easily.

      Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        I really, really regret this purchase. Sorta feel like literally any other saw I bought I could have been cutting with by now.

        Rickety design, poor aftermarket support and a fence that no one carries all parts for, much less the whole assembly.

        Why is this **** thing popular?

        Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Why is this **** thing popular?
          Purchased for $100? Didn't purchase new? That is what is wrong with it, probably beat up before you got it.

          What do we like about it: for most of us, precision cabinet making quality CUTS at job site saw price. Does quite a bit. Not made for rough and tough throw it around in the back of the truck. But Take care of it and it is a sweet cutting saw. Don't force it or try to build a house with it in a week.

          Below is only one item that I made with the BT3000. Made numerous things with precision cuts and not problems.
          Attached Files
          Last edited by leehljp; 09-20-2018, 10:33 PM.
          Hank Lee

          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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          • #6
            Yes, its certainly not the saws fault. I know.

            She and I are doing a bit better now. Fence clamps are otw, sandpaper is locking it down in the meantime. One of the prior owners has the router extension table set wrong, getting that figured out has it working a bit better too.

            New miter table slides on the way, but I finally got the grooves cleaned out enough so it works and made a few test cuts yesterday. Combination Freud for now.

            Next task is building a couple extensions. Wish I could find some of those miter slot extensions ryobi used to sell for it, but they don't seem to be real abundant.

            Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Argfather View Post
              I really, really regret this purchase. Sorta feel like literally any other saw I bought I could have been cutting with by now.

              Rickety design, poor aftermarket support and a fence that no one carries all parts for, much less the whole assembly.

              Why is this **** thing popular?
              The saw has been out of production for over a decade now. How many other tools that have been gone that long have readily available parts?

              When the saw is working as designed, it's very accurate, reliable, and sold for a great price back in the day (and you can still find good ones cheap today). I bought mine in 2004 and it's still going strong. Parts machines are also readily available since this was a very popular saw that was out in one form or another for nearly 20 years.

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              • #8
                How many other table saws out of production for a decade have useable parts?

                I hazard to say most, actually. Used to own a ts2424. You could order every part ever made. It was interchangeable with 10 other brands.

                Having said that, its coming along...and I'm not giving up. Roll pin punches just got here so it's time to find out if this thing can cut straight!

                Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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