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Segmenting jig on sliding table.

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  • Segmenting jig on sliding table.

    I've been a member here for a couple years and have enjoyed seeing all the great ideas shared. I received a lathe for Christmas this last year and have been enjoying getting back into woodworking. I've had my BT3000 since 1996 or so and has been a great machine over that time period. With the lathe though, I wanted to try making some segmented bowls. Without ever getting the double miter add on, I've always thought I could just make a miter slot for jigs. Then it dawned on me... Why not just use the sliding table and attach the jig to the table using the same pin holes the table fence uses. I didn't have any dowels that size so I turned a couple using a chunk of scrap walnut from a log. Attached them built the rest of the jig and made some tests. The ultimate test was the bowl which I'm pretty happy with. Just wanted to share this as I hadn't seen this same configuration used. (Doesn't mean it wasn't done before, I just hadn't seen it.)
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  • #2
    WOW, that looks great. Great idea and simple, (but precise). Thanks for sharing this.

    I too want/need a segmenting sled. I hadn't thought of using the miter sled.

    One caveat is that the miter sled must be "tuned" or there will be error in it. I have two miter sleds, and one is in constant need of being adjusted but the other has been dead on since I bought it in 2000. That issue is what divides most people. If one has a great sliding table, then this is a great machine; if it is one that needs constant adjustment then this is just a cheap saw. I have one SMT that could use a jig like yours.

    Thanks for posting the picts.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #3
      That looks well executed. I know precious little about turning, though, so I'm not sure how you use this. Care to explain?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tfischer View Post
        That looks well executed. I know precious little about turning, though, so I'm not sure how you use this. Care to explain?
        Instead of taking a single one piece of wood to make a bowl or plate or vase, one or more different flat boards are cut into segments and the segments are glued together to make a design and then they are turned.

        The segmenting jig is set up to make the angle cut on one side/end, and then do a corresponding angle cut on the other side/end.

        Here are some links to segment making - go down though the links and you can see a progression of how "segment cuts" make up a bowl:

        http://www.turnedwood.com/images/Segment_cut_6.jpg

        http://www.turnedwood.com/images/Segment_glue_1.jpg

        http://www.turnedwood.com/images/Segment_cut_7.jpg

        http://www.turnedwood.com/images/Bowl0652a.jpg

        If a cut is as much as 1/8th of a degree off, then there can be space in some places where segments meet. If one segment is 1/32 longer than another segment, then problems can arise. Segments have to be dead on. And making repetitive cuts the same length and angle are a necessity. Difficult at first but gets easier with practice and experience. More easy for some than for others.
        Last edited by leehljp; 09-12-2018, 01:05 PM.
        Hank Lee

        Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by leehljp View Post
          One caveat is that the miter sled must be "tuned" or there will be error in it.
          Thanks for the compliments and yes, the slide table must be "tuned." I did this first thing. I also figured out to push the jig straight or the table can cant a bit. Next I need to get some wedgies to make setting the fences easier. Using a 5" digital protractor from HomeDepot now which actually is pretty darn accurate. Impressive for a $19.97 Husky. It was very helpful in "tuning" the table and making sure the blade was 90 degree vertical. Just having the wedgies might be a little easier for setting. Need to make handles for the screw downs on the jig too... coming soon.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by leehljp View Post
            That issue is what divides most people. If one has a great sliding table, then this is a great machine; if it is one that needs constant adjustment then this is just a cheap saw. I have one SMT that could use a jig like yours.

            Thanks for posting the picts.
            I seem to be one of the lucky/fortunate ones. One of the first things I did when finding this site circa 2004 was to build the "tuning jig". It's hung on the side of my saw ever since. Once in a great while I'll pull it out, and go through the tuning motions... and almost never have I had to actually change any tuning.

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            • #7
              I hadn't seen or heard of a "tuning jig" for the BT3000. What does it look like? Is there a link here to one that I just haven't thought of searching for yet?

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              • #8
                I realized I didn't post a picture of the bowl I made using the jig.

                Click image for larger version

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by baumer64 View Post
                  I hadn't seen or heard of a "tuning jig" for the BT3000. What does it look like? Is there a link here to one that I just haven't thought of searching for yet?
                  I couldn't find the SMT Alignment Jig on here. It was a rather simple one. Anyone have a link for this? Please post this if you have it. Thanks

                  FOUND IT: Lonnie's Jig
                  https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...lignment-2007=
                  Last edited by leehljp; 09-13-2018, 11:28 AM.
                  Hank Lee

                  Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                  Comment

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