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Grizzly 10 inch Wet Slow Grinder

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  • Grizzly 10 inch Wet Slow Grinder

    About 2 years ago, I bought the Grizzly 10” slow speed wet grinder on sale while I was in Springfield, MO visiting my daughter. It has been setting on a bench in a corner since then - until a few weeks ago.

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-W...tion/T10010ANV

    (Background- When I was in Japan, I had equal tools there that I have here (USA). When I returned and brought most of my tools back, my shop here was so filled with tools and boxes that there was not enough space to work inside.) I had enough space overall, but with three daughter’s worth of excess furniture and items stored in half the shop, I had no room for work. Last summer, I made my girls get or get rid of their “memories” items. Then some of my excess tools, I gave away to my son-in-laws. Since last fall, I have had room in which to work - except the shop was unheated and un-air conditioned. The shop was two rooms, and one room, the one with my daughter’s storage items had heat and AC. After I got THAT room cleaned out, it needed some floor repair. I finished it and began transitioning my two lathes to the heated room, along with my scroll saw, drill press, work table and small tool storage area.)


    Well, I have my lathes in place and am ready to turn some pens and bowls in a room of comfortable temperature. My tools are comparatively dull now. I have used the scary sharp method of keeping my lathe tools sharp. But they all need a refresh grinding. I pulled out the Grizzly grinder, added water to the tray and let it run for about 10 minutes and added more water.

    I put my favorite (custom made) scraper chisel (HSS) and set it to the angle that I wanted. I discovered what a “slow” grinder is - SLOW. It took me about 7 to 8 minutes to take the face down to a complete concave grind side to side and bottom to top. After a complete re-grind, It wasn’t that sharp, IMO, but it was a complete grind on the face. I liked the wide stone and I moved the scraper back and forth in a slow motion with moderate pressure. The chisel was clamped into the guide and the guide slid side to side easily. The water coming over kept everything completely cool.

    Next, I added some paste to the leather wheel and honed it for about 1 minute. It still did not feel completely sharp to touch. I had expected this from both experience before and from reading a few years ago about the proper way to sharpen, even with a Tormek. I read an article (about the Tormek) and how one professional said the Tormek was not the end all in shapening. Honing was needed AFTER using a Tormek. I also knew that honing paste was usually still too course for precision sharpening. So, after using the honing paste and leather wheel, I pulled out my scary sharp .2?micron sand paper and honed it 4 or 5 swipes - and suddenly - WOW. I could FEEL the difference from before and after. I know what the scary sharp method feels like with sharp, but this brought it up a WHOLE notch.

    The clamp guide gave great alignment to the chisel, the concave grind allowed for easier honing, the honing got the edge into shape and the scary sharp .2micron sandpaper produced a sharpness with ease that I have not felt before, even when using the scary sharp system previously many times.

    Back to the Grizzly - I may be wrong, but I feel the lack of heat generated because it was using a water wheel and the water was 100% running over the grind at all times, the HSS grind held its hardness. This hardness is lost during heated grinds, and even slow speed 1750rpm grinders can cause temp problems on the finer edges. (I am forgetting the correct term at the moment). Anyway, the slow speed water wheel did a fantastic job of getting the correct alignment for the tool. I can’t wait until I have time to sharpen all of my chisels and even knives.

    The sharpening process is noticeably slower than even using a slow 1750rpm grinder because the Grizzly wet grinder is 110RPM. This took a little mental adjustment on my part. I have a VS Delta grinder (2000 - 3450) and it is faster for sure, but it does generate heat. Going down to a 110rpm does take more time to get the edge right, but it sure does a super job.

    I feel like I have found a new best friend in my shop!
    Last edited by leehljp; 02-13-2018, 02:00 PM.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

  • #2
    I bought that Grizz about three years ago, when they were having their 50th anniversary sale. It was one of desperate moments when my wife told me I needed to pick out a tool for a Christmas present. At this age, I really don't need anything and when I got Grizzly's holiday flyer, I just went what the hay!

    It was about that time when I was selecting a shed to be my new workshop. The shed is in the backyard, but I'm still challenged with time to work on it, and thus the Grizzly 10" Wet Grinder Kit still sits here in the box on the floor of basement shop. When it arrived, I took it out to look it over and make sure everything worked; but beyond that, I haven't had the need to actually use it.

    It looks pretty nice and compares to the Tormek in it's very similar design, though lacking in build quality most likely. The price difference is what made me take the purchase though. Perhaps later this year I'll finally get things done and move all my woodworking to "the shed". That will be a welcome completion to the new shop.

    CWS
    Think it Through Before You Do!

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    • #3
      CW,
      When I got my grizzly 10" grinder (just found that it was in 2015), there was a few posts on the pen turning forum about slow speed grinder bushings and how the right bushings would make a huge difference in its performance. I didn't have those bushings but in searching and reading on the issue, I took my grinder and set it up. I put a stand with a reference point next to the wheel and would tighten the wheel very snug and then rotate. It did have a small wobble. I would loosen the nut, hold the shaft and rotate the wheel about 1/8 of a turn; tighten the nut and do the same. I put marks on the wheel and on the shaft. It took me about 30 minutes but I learned where the shaft and wheel seemed to be balanced the best with the least amount of wobble. I didn't need the special bushings although I would like to have a pair. When I sharpened the lathe chisel, I looked for minute' amounts of wobble but I could not detect any with my eyes or through feel of sharpening the blade.

      Just in case you or anyone else would like to know about the slow grinder bushings, here is the link: https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...ng-2-Piece-Set
      Hank Lee

      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

      Comment


      • #4
        Hank,

        Thanks for the link. I'm afraid I'm not yet knowledgeable enough to know whether I need them. When I received the wet grinder, I took it out of the box and set it up on my portable bench just to make sure the motor turned over and to check the wheel rotation for wobble. While I didn't go through the process of marking how exactly smooth the wheel surface might be, it visually appeared to be quite smooth.

        I don't really look at the grinder as being something that I'll be able to put the final mirror-like finish to the steel, as much as just putting an edge and then doing the final polish with my trusty old granite and wet/dry paper as you earlier mentioned. I do have the Veritas Mk II honing guide as well as the skew attachment and angle guide. I don't do turning so my needs are primarily chisels and plane irons.

        Thanks,

        CWS
        Think it Through Before You Do!

        Comment


        • #5
          I have two Tormek's, both bought used (one with jigs for sub $200), and recommended the Grizzly to my dad starting out. (used the second/chipped stone I got with my first Tormek on it). I am seriously considering getting one of these to operate a CBN wheel, preferably more coarse for rough shaping and gouge/damage removal.
          She couldn't tell the difference between the escape pod, and the bathroom. We had to go back for her.........................Twice.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by LinuxRandal View Post
            I have two Tormek's, both bought used (one with jigs for sub $200), and recommended the Grizzly to my dad starting out. (used the second/chipped stone I got with my first Tormek on it). I am seriously considering getting one of these to operate a CBN wheel, preferably more coarse for rough shaping and gouge/damage removal.
            Wouldn't the Grizzly (110 RPM) be too slow for a CBN wheel? I thought they (CBN) were meant to turn at 1500 to 1750 RPM. They don't heat up and that is good, but the speed will bring a tool to shape quickly at that speed. My grizzly is about 5 to 7 minute for facing a chisel to full hollow grind. Not bad, but in this world of instant satisfaction and the advent of CBN wheels, it can be done just as well and faster on 1750 RPM grinders, from my limited understanding. I haven't used or seen a CBN wheel except in pictures, so this is only my "guessing".
            Hank Lee

            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

            Comment

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