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Ryobi JM82K Biscuit joiner oddities.

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  • Ryobi JM82K Biscuit joiner oddities.

    It's been a few years since I dusted off the old Ryobi JM82K biscuit joiner, mostly because I haven't had a project that needed biscuits. Well warm up the gravy here come the biscuits!

    I discovered a couple of things when trying to use it again after all these years though,

    #1. I really don't understand the markings on the JM82K's fence height gauge. And if online reviews and videos are any indication, I am far from alone. And last night while fiddling around with it, I discovered something.
    With the fence down low, there is a horizontal mark much larger than any of the others in the scale, that appears to fall right at the half inch mark. This is, and I can't repeat this strongly enough, an optical illusion. I have discovered through use / experimenting, that setting your fence height to this point will indeed place your biscuit right in the middle of 3/4" stock. Raising the fence to the full height where you can see the scale between 0 and 1" and the scale becomes obvious. Live and learn, Move on...
    #2. Ryobi attaches a small piece of specially cut sandpaper to the front / outside of the blade slot. I assume to help the tool keep from slipping while in use. This sandpaper is bonded on with just some sort of self stick stuff. Which on mine in the Texas heat, has dried up. A quick spray of 3M 77 spray adhesive on the back side and pushed back into place all appears good, except you need to be extra careful with overspray from this stuff....

    Having re learned what I apparently forgot, it is now time to get back out into the shop, and cut to cutting, slotting for biscuits and gluing up my quick glue up...
    My personal workshop blog is http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com. My camping / hunting / outdoor blog is http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com/ |My DIY / Woodworking Youtube Channel

  • #2
    I have one of those somewhere - I think. I had it in Japan and do not remember leaving it behind! It used really small biscuits - if it is the same one.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

    Comment


    • #3
      I have the JM82, not sure what improvements may or may not have been made since that model. Actually, I didn't realize it had been superseded. In any case, I really like the model that I have, though I haven't used it in a few years now.

      I bought it when I was working on the library and I wanted to join 3/4 x 10-inch wide stock to make the tops for the window seats and the media desk. Biscuit joining was so much faster than using dowels as I had on previous projects. While it's been several years now, those jointed tops are as flat and solid as ever, despite regularly sitting and even standing on them at times... no separation of the joints at all.

      Despite the many times I've read of the drawbacks of using biscuits, I'm really quite pleased; and though the Ryobi JM82 is a bit bulky bulky, I found it more ergonomic to use than other brands.

      CWS
      Think it Through Before You Do!

      Comment


      • #4
        Hank,

        Sounds like you have the Detail Biscuit Joiner, the DBJ50K. I still have two of them and love 'em.
        Dan

        In a recent survey, 4 out of 5 hammers preferred thumbs.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dangre View Post
          Hank,

          Sounds like you have the Detail Biscuit Joiner, the DBJ50K. I still have two of them and love 'em.
          I want to go look for it now. I still have a few tools I haven't seen since I returned. I know they are here somewhere. Thanks for the reminder!
          Hank Lee

          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

          Comment


          • #6
            I just looked up "JM82K" on the Ryobi website to see what the differences might be, and see that it has been discontinued. However, the "K" is for "Kit" and so I guess my JM82 is the same model, which I bought with the case, etc. (But the nameplate just states "JM82".

            In any case, I do see the markings described.

            CWS
            Think it Through Before You Do!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cwsmith View Post
              I have the JM82, not sure what improvements may or may not have been made since that model. Actually, I didn't realize it had been superseded. In any case, I really like the model that I have, though I haven't used it in a few years now.

              I bought it when I was working on the library and I wanted to join 3/4 x 10-inch wide stock to make the tops for the window seats and the media desk. Biscuit joining was so much faster than using dowels as I had on previous projects. While it's been several years now, those jointed tops are as flat and solid as ever, despite regularly sitting and even standing on them at times... no separation of the joints at all.

              Despite the many times I've read of the drawbacks of using biscuits, I'm really quite pleased; and though the Ryobi JM82 is a bit bulky bulky, I found it more ergonomic to use than other brands.

              CWS
              The ergonomics of the biscuit joiner is exactly why I bought mine. It really is super easy to use compared to a barrel handle model...
              My personal workshop blog is http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com. My camping / hunting / outdoor blog is http://wildersport-outdoors.blogspot.com/ |My DIY / Woodworking Youtube Channel

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dbhost View Post

                The ergonomics of the biscuit joiner is exactly why I bought mine. It really is super easy to use compared to a barrel handle model...
                I was wondering if it was me or what! I bought a Porter Cable 556 model Biscuit Joiner about 20 - 25 years ago in which the handle is somewhat similar to the JM 82. I also like it much better than the barrel handled versions. I am sure that barrel handled biscuit versions of different models are probably better and more expensive tools, but I prefer tools with handle grips, including jig saws and even grinders, which is rare for grinders.
                Hank Lee

                Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                Comment

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