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BT3000 Bevel Jump Issue Revisited (and solved?)

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  • BT3000 Bevel Jump Issue Revisited (and solved?)

    I just solved the Bevel Jump Issue on my 3000. It was simple enough that I kept overlooking it. (EDITED - This fixed only part of it. See below for the final solution. In my case, it was a two part fix.)

    The Lift/Bevel lever that locks and releases has a Set Screw on it. IF the Set Screw is NOT TIGHT, it will Jump off the bevel setting when moving the lever to the lock position.

    If I hold the Bevel wheel in place and hold the Lock Lever securely and move to Lock, the blade housing does not jump.

    I replaced shims and added a Shim holder for the first time in 15 years today. While I had it apart, I wanted to check on the Bevel Jump. I checked and double checked tightness on the everything I could. I took the handle off and the lever also. I took the lock lever off and put it back on. Then the wheel. The wheel kept the lock lever on well enough with just a very little movement, so I didn't think about the set screw. Then I thought, why does the lock lever need a set screw? Next, with an allen wrench, I checked it and It was not tight at all. . . tightened that sucker and the Bevel Jump was gone. . .Edited: only partially!

    Original discussion about a year ago - but it was originally about a different issue on the bevel:
    http://www.sawdustzone.org/showthrea...ighlight=bevel
    Last edited by leehljp; 09-26-2015, 05:28 PM.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

  • #2
    Awesome and thank you! I can't wait to try this out. I'm tied up helping put an addition on my parents house so time is scarce, but I am definitely going to make time to check this out.
    Joe

    Comment


    • #3
      "Tighting the Set Screw on the lock leaver" - All Thumbs had written about this on your (Joe's) original post. I didn't catch it at that time.

      I am still having problem with it jumping if I am just casually holding the hand wheel, but I can control it if I have a firm grip on the wheel and holding it in place - while locking the lever.

      The secret to being able to work at all for me - was the set screw, but not the best.

      The Set Screw is EASY to overlook, and because the lock lever fits so snug, you wouldn't think it is loose. Actually the lever is not loose but the lock nut inside of the lever (which you cannot see) is loose, and the set screw jams the locking nut to the lever.

      Edited in: FOUND THE FULL PROBLEM for me.


      1. The set screw must be tight! Been there and done that; Result: Do-able but not great.
      2. Experimented with the cam spacer between the lock lever and wheel.
      In the words of Spock: "Logic dictates" (at least to me) that the cam spacer should fit inside the lock lever and then the wheel can be added and tightened. WRONG! And that is what I HAD been doing.
      I next tried placing the cam spacer that goes between the lock lever and wheel in the position so that it was just starting into its inward slide, then added the wheel. Tightened the wheel and it is working. No jumping!

      The position of the spacer between the lock lever and wheel is KEY number 2!
      Last edited by leehljp; 09-26-2015, 08:30 PM.
      Hank Lee

      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

      Comment


      • #4
        Hank,

        I had this same exact "bevel jump" issue. In fact, mine was so bad that I had to pull out on the handle and hold it in place when moving the lever to the locked position (particularly when trying to set a zero bevel). I was so excited when I read this post I went straight outside to check my set screw (which I had never noticed before). Sure enough, it was "very" loose (probably would have lost it fairly soon). I tightened the set screw and it helped considerably, but it still tends to move - especially at zero - unless I hold the hand wheel when locking. I experimented a little with the position of the locking lever (toward or away from the hand wheel without removing the wheel) before tightening the set screw, but I still don't feel that I have it exactly right. I have never removed the wheel or the locking lever and I'm having a hard time visualizing how you had things oriented before you tighten the set screw. What was the position of the lever when you tightened your set screw (locked, unlocked, or somewhere between)?

        Please let me know what you suggest and Have a great weekend!

        Thanks,
        John

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jlhumbert View Post
          Hank,

          I had this same exact "bevel jump" issue. In fact, mine was so bad that I had to pull out on the handle and hold it in place when moving the lever to the locked position (particularly when trying to set a zero bevel). I was so excited when I read this post I went straight outside to check my set screw (which I had never noticed before). Sure enough, it was "very" loose (probably would have lost it fairly soon). I tightened the set screw and it helped considerably, but it still tends to move - especially at zero - unless I hold the hand wheel when locking. I experimented a little with the position of the locking lever (toward or away from the hand wheel without removing the wheel) before tightening the set screw, but I still don't feel that I have it exactly right. I have never removed the wheel or the locking lever and I'm having a hard time visualizing how you had things oriented before you tighten the set screw. What was the position of the lever when you tightened your set screw (locked, unlocked, or somewhere between)?

          Please let me know what you suggest and Have a great weekend!

          Thanks,
          John
          First, I had the blade full up so that I could hold it if needed. (Of course the saw was unplugged ;-) ) With the blade vertical, and with the handle wheel off, there were two notches or positions that the locking lever could be on. (Actually, you can orient the lock lever at any position and then lock the set screw, but it would be either uncomfortable or discombobulated to operate. The lock lever and set screw POSITION is not the key. It is that the set screw locks the lever to the nut that it fits on/over. This is what helps.

          Because the lock lever is held on by a cam spacer and the wheel, you cannot see the nut that the lock lever tightens, but the set screw must be tight for that to happen.

          Back to the notch - placing the lock lever in the most convenient position to lock and unlock is OK, it was a matter of how it felt to me when locking or unlocking. I chose the notch that let the bar swing a tad more to the left and then set the screw tight. That was more comfortable to me to grab and lock or unlock.

          Since you have not had the wheel off, all I can say is that it may have been assembled wrong or someone else had it off. It might be possible for the wheel to be loose enough for the cam to have slipped a notch. Have you ever had to tighten the wheel with an allen wrench?

          Next, that middle spacer between the lock lever and wheel - how it fits on is the SECOND key to it working. Now, when I move the lock/unlock lever, it pushes the wheel back towards the user (me). That is the cam working. I don't know exactly how to describe it, but it seems like there or three or 4 positions that it (the cam between the wheel and lock lever) can be placed relative to the locking lever. Choose the wrong one and it does not work right.

          All of this is not too complicated if you take it apart. If it doesn't work properly, Take the wheel off and move the middle cam spacer a 1/4 turn and add the wheel and see if it works. If not, take it off again and move it 1/4 turn more. IIRC, there are only 4 positions the middle cam can be in. I could be wrong on the number of positions for the cam but it is not infinite. Shouldn't take more than 5 to 7 minutes at the most to try it (take the handle wheel off and rotating the cam) two or three times.
          Last edited by leehljp; 10-02-2015, 09:22 PM.
          Hank Lee

          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

          Comment


          • #6
            You also have to make sure the handwheel screw is very snug. All the screws need to be very snug.

            Comment


            • #7
              Problem solved for me too -- thanks Hank!

              Originally posted by leehljp View Post
              First, I had the blade full up so that I could hold it if needed. (Of course the saw was unplugged ;-) ) With the blade vertical, and with the handle wheel off, there were two notches or positions that the locking lever could be on. (Actually, you can orient the lock lever at any position and then lock the set screw, but it would be either uncomfortable or discombobulated to operate. The lock lever and set screw POSITION is not the key. It is that the set screw locks the lever to the nut that it fits on/over. This is what helps.

              Because the lock lever is held on by a cam spacer and the wheel, you cannot see the nut that the lock lever tightens, but the set screw must be tight for that to happen.

              Back to the notch - placing the lock lever in the most convenient position to lock and unlock is OK, it was a matter of how it felt to me when locking or unlocking. I chose the notch that let the bar swing a tad more to the left and then set the screw tight. That was more comfortable to me to grab and lock or unlock.

              Since you have not had the wheel off, all I can say is that it may have been assembled wrong or someone else had it off. It might be possible for the wheel to be loose enough for the cam to have slipped a notch. Have you ever had to tighten the wheel with an allen wrench?

              Next, that middle spacer between the lock lever and wheel - how it fits on is the SECOND key to it working. Now, when I move the lock/unlock lever, it pushes the wheel back towards the user (me). That is the cam working. I don't know exactly how to describe it, but it seems like there or three or 4 positions that it (the cam between the wheel and lock lever) can be placed relative to the locking lever. Choose the wrong one and it does not work right.

              All of this is not too complicated if you take it apart. If it doesn't work properly, Take the wheel off and move the middle cam spacer a 1/4 turn and add the wheel and see if it works. If not, take it off again and move it 1/4 turn more. IIRC, there are only 4 positions the middle cam can be in. I could be wrong on the number of positions for the cam but it is not infinite. Shouldn't take more than 5 to 7 minutes at the most to try it (take the handle wheel off and rotating the cam) two or three times.
              Hank, thank you for the quick reply and the detailed explanation. I took your advice and removed the hand wheel. Once the wheel was removed, it was easy for me to see how the parts should be assembled. I oriented the locking handle the way I wanted it and assembled everything back using your advice and it works perfectly now. Setting a bevel is no longer a frustrating experience and I'm very happy with it now. Had I not seen this thread, I would have continued to assume that's just the way it worked -- and I'm sure my locking lever set screw would have soon fallen out and been lost (although I probably wouldn't have know it).

              Thank you again, your help is greatly appreciated!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by All Thumbs View Post
                You also have to make sure the handwheel screw is very snug. All the screws need to be very snug.
                Thank you! I made sure they are both very snug. It's working great now!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Doumo arigatou gozaimasu, Hank. A million thank you's.

                  I finally had the chance to look at this tonight. My set screw wasn't terribly loose, but I tightened it, anyway. The large nut behind the handle (against the body of the saw) was VERY loose--almost falling off. I snugged that up (had to back it off, I tightened it too much at first) and put everything back together per Hank's GREAT instructions. Works like a charm now. I am very happy to have a functioning bevel now. In fact, I for the first time in a LONG time, the blade is actually at zero, since it is so much easier to set now.

                  I was ready to scrap this thing over this issue, so you saved me from the dark side. At least for now...
                  Joe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoeyGee View Post
                    Doumo arigatou gozaimasu, Hank. A million thank you's.

                    I finally had the chance to look at this tonight. My set screw wasn't terribly loose, but I tightened it, anyway. The large nut behind the handle (against the body of the saw) was VERY loose--almost falling off. I snugged that up (had to back it off, I tightened it too much at first) and put everything back together per Hank's GREAT instructions. Works like a charm now. I am very happy to have a functioning bevel now. In fact, I for the first time in a LONG time, the blade is actually at zero, since it is so much easier to set now.

                    I was ready to scrap this thing over this issue, so you saved me from the dark side. At least for now...

                    I didn't mention that part (in bold above), as mine was snug when I started. But it certainly could be the problem on some. THANKS for mentioning it. This is a team effort!
                    Hank Lee

                    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hank, you should document this in an article.
                      Joe

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good idea.

                        It may take me a couple of weeks to get a few picts together and figure out how to post it. I will work on it.
                        Hank Lee

                        Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Hank-

                          I could send a short video of what is happening. But, don't think I can post videos to this forum yet.

                          Thanks,
                          Kirkg

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think you can now. It may be the third post that is required before you can, and now you have 3 posts. The next one will be the 4th post for you.
                            Hank Lee

                            Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here are links to the 3 videos. The password for each is BT3000. It may take a while before they can be viewed.
                              https://vimeo.com/242179388
                              https://vimeo.com/242179527
                              https://vimeo.com/242179258

                              Thanks,
                              Kirkg

                              Comment

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