Broken handle - any ideas?

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  • #16
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ID:	850612 I double checked, the questions made me doubt my tool. I checked and it is m10x1.5…. Like you said, whereas I wrote m10.5! What ! I found my note where I wrote my measurements down as 10x1.5. I guess I entered it down wrong or more than likely spell check got me. Nothing new with iPad!
    Last edited by capncarl; 05-08-2022, 09:18 PM.

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    • #17
      nicer20 how is the handle replacement going? Obviously you could buy your friend a replacement for the tool you broke, or at least contribute to its replacement, however I think a fix of the existing tool keeping it on the road as it were is a much nicer solution.
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      • #18
        Originally posted by dbhost View Post
        nicer20 how is the handle replacement going? Obviously you could buy your friend a replacement for the tool you broke, or at least contribute to its replacement, however I think a fix of the existing tool keeping it on the road as it were is a much nicer solution.
        I had been kind of busy at work as well as the last weekend which was a mother's day weekend. In the meantime, I did go around trying to find the 10mm threaded rod locally first - especially I like to support the True Value and Ace stores around - very helpful and nice folks. Unfortunately they only had 100mm length (~4") which might be too short for my application. So ordered and waiting for Amazon part to arrive soon.

        Will post how it goes.

        Thanks

        NG

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        • #19
          Buy a used Hitachi online, give the neighbor the handle off it one you just bought and build yourself a handle for your new used saw!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by capncarl View Post
            Buy a used Hitachi online, give the neighbor the handle off it one you just bought and build yourself a handle for your new used saw!
            LOL - BTW found one on eBay nearby that I could drive to and get, but guess what it was missing

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            • #21
              Get a good price bargaining it down cause it's missing the handle and you can't get them anymore.

              Then make two handles. It is always easy to make two when you make one. You already have the dowel and the all thread and don't need to get more for a second set. The drilling setup only needs to be done once. And you've done all the research and thinking and planning.

              Then you have a nice rescued saw for cheap and your friend's saw is fixed.

              Btw get two M10 nuts to lock together to use when driving the all thread in.
              Last edited by LCHIEN; 05-12-2022, 05:40 PM.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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              • #22
                Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
                Get a good price bargaining it down cause it's missing the handle and you can't get them anymore.

                Then make two handles. It is always easy to make two when you make one. You already have the dowel and the all thread and don't need to get more for a second set. The drilling setup only needs to be done once. And you've done all the research and thinking and planning.

                Then you have a nice rescued saw for cheap and your friend's saw is fixed.

                Btw get two M10 nuts to lock together to use when driving the all thread in.

                OK sure I will get two M10 nuts to drive the threaded rod - good point. I am planning to drill the dowel with a 3/8" drill bit and then drive the M10 rod. My understanding is 3/8" = 9.525 mm. I believe this will give enough bite into the dowel but at the same time avoid cracking it. Please correct me if I am wrong. TIA.

                Back to the point of getting a miter saw, I am dreaming of getting a sliding miter saw instead of a simple one. Of course, the table saw is there but I feel the miter saw is much more convenient for quick cuts and longer stock compared to setting up the table saw. Unless you guys think it is a bad idea.

                Thanks again,

                NG
                Last edited by nicer20; 05-13-2022, 12:05 AM.

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                • #23
                  Here's my opinion.
                  Sliding miter saws tend to be deep - they need a track to run the blade and motor back and forth So it may impact how far this thing sticks out from the wall.
                  My consideration was between a 10"slider and a 12" dual bevel compound. I opted for a dual bevel 12" Hitachi, now MetaboHPT. C12FDH
                  It cuts 4x4 and 2x4 on edge where my 10" could not cut the 4x4 all the way through and barely did 1x6. I was also afraid that the sliding system could have play and made inaccurate cuts.

                  I use the miter saw a lot.... I classify cuts as
                  1. moving saw/fixed wood (Miter saw)
                  2. fixed saw/moving wood (Table saw)
                  One is good when you have really long pieces that want to twist on you.
                  Two is good when you have shorter pieces and sheet goods and long rips.
                  Two is also good for partial though cuts. for grooving and dadoes.
                  Loring in Katy, TX USA
                  If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                  BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by nicer20 View Post


                    - good point. I am planning to drill the dowel with a 3/8" drill bit and then drive the M10 rod. My understanding is 3/8" = 9.525 mm. I believe this will give enough bite into the dowel but at the same time avoid cracking it. Please correct me if I am wrong. TIA.


                    NG
                    Yeah the OD of the threaded 10 mm handle of my Hitachi was 9.8 mm which I am sure represents all M10 threads. So you'll have a small amount of interference which would allow you to thread it in.
                    If you use your Drill press to center the hole in the dowel leave it clamped in place and remove the drill bit. remove the belt from the DP, use a grinder or belt/disc sander or something to put a small bevel on the front of the threaded rod (cut to length)
                    Put the rod into the DP to align it perfectly with the hole so it goes in straight. Use one hand to lower the quill to meet the hole while turning the chuck by hand to start the thread once you get 2-3-4 threads started you can take it out of the chuck and put the dowel in a vise and use the two nuts (lock them together on the threads with two wrenches) and a ratchet and socket to drive it in.

                    If you start the rod crooked it gets much harder to drive it in as it goes deeper. It will get harder as you engage more threads but crooked = even harder still as it will bind. And it will look like heck.
                    When you roll the dowel + rod on a table top you can readily tell how perfectly centered and straight it is.
                    Last bit of advice: Drill a hole in a scrap 2x4 the same size as your dowel then split it with your table saw through the middle of the hole. Use this for clamping the dowel w/o damaging it both while drilling the center hole and when driving the rod in with the ratchet. This will increase the holding contact and not put vise pressure on just two sides of the dowel but rather most of the circumference. It will prevent marring and denting the handle!!! DAMHIKT!! And it will probably keep the dowel upright as you work on it.
                    Last edited by LCHIEN; 05-13-2022, 02:43 AM.
                    Loring in Katy, TX USA
                    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Nice directions and write up Lchien! I noticed that my Hitachi handle was not true but didn’t appear to be bent or damaged. I never noticed it before. Knowing this I wouldn’t be too concerned to making mine perfectly concentric. I’d drill the hole like you described but I’d tap the hole with a metal cutting tap for the threaded rod. I’d add aprox 2 inches to the required rod length so I could grip it with a vice grip on one end and the other end I’d saw it about 45 degrees. This excess can be sawed off later, and you will have a nice handle to hood on to. Clean up the saw cut threaded rod a bit with a file and it will easily screw into the threaded wood and will cut its own threads when it continues past the cut threads. Threaded rod is less likely to split. Before I cut off the sawed angel I’d remove the rod, put a generous squirt of Titebond in the hole and screw the rod back in. The Titebond will set up overnight and the jam nut will keep it from ever coming out.

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                      • #26
                        Oh yeah, one more piece of advise. If hacksawing or cutting the rod, thread a nut onto it first. Then cut the rod, grind or sand any big burrs. then back the nut off over the cut - this will clean up any burrs that prevent you from threading it into the final item.
                        Loring in Katy, TX USA
                        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                        Comment


                        • nicer20
                          nicer20 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Great will do so. Since I am using the threaded rod as per your suggestions, anyways I can drive the nuts from the other side to clean up the burrs but nonetheless threading nuts will also help me hold the rod in vise.

                      • #27
                        Originally posted by capncarl View Post
                        Nice directions and write up Lchien! I noticed that my Hitachi handle was not true but didn’t appear to be bent or damaged. I never noticed it before. Knowing this I wouldn’t be too concerned to making mine perfectly concentric. I’d drill the hole like you described but I’d tap the hole with a metal cutting tap for the threaded rod. I’d add aprox 2 inches to the required rod length so I could grip it with a vice grip on one end and the other end I’d saw it about 45 degrees. This excess can be sawed off later, and you will have a nice handle to hood on to. Clean up the saw cut threaded rod a bit with a file and it will easily screw into the threaded wood and will cut its own threads when it continues past the cut threads. Threaded rod is less likely to split. Before I cut off the sawed angel I’d remove the rod, put a generous squirt of Titebond in the hole and screw the rod back in. The Titebond will set up overnight and the jam nut will keep it from ever coming out.
                        So are you suggesting that the end that gets driven into the dowel should be cut 45 degrees? Since I don't have a 10mmx1.5 tap. (I have a SAE tap set so the closest might be 3/8"-16 tap). So my thought was to start driving the rod directly using Loring's method. Btw I was thinking of having like a couple of notches on the end to help me cut threads into the dowel.

                        What say?

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                        • LCHIEN
                          LCHIEN commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Actually, come to think of it, you can chamfer the hole in the dowel, easier than chamfering the rod, to make it easy to enter the dowel.

                        • nicer20
                          nicer20 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Great advice sir - as usual !!

                        • capncarl
                          capncarl commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Cutting the threaded rod off at a sharp angle, not necessarily 45 degrees, turns it into a makeshift tap. Like suggested, chamfer the inside of the dowel and you can thread the rod into the wood. It will be a chore though, that is the reason I suggested tapping the hole first.

                          There is no need to overthink this handle replacement. If you drill the dowel and insert the rod in with plenty of Titebond and put a nut on each end it will tighten up the Hitachi saw forever.

                      • #28
                        Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post

                        Yeah the OD of the threaded 10 mm handle of my Hitachi was 9.8 mm which I am sure represents all M10 threads. So you'll have a small amount of interference which would allow you to thread it in.
                        If you use your Drill press to center the hole in the dowel leave it clamped in place and remove the drill bit. remove the belt from the DP, use a grinder or belt/disc sander or something to put a small bevel on the front of the threaded rod (cut to length)
                        Put the rod into the DP to align it perfectly with the hole so it goes in straight. Use one hand to lower the quill to meet the hole while turning the chuck by hand to start the thread once you get 2-3-4 threads started you can take it out of the chuck and put the dowel in a vise and use the two nuts (lock them together on the threads with two wrenches) and a ratchet and socket to drive it in.

                        If you start the rod crooked it gets much harder to drive it in as it goes deeper. It will get harder as you engage more threads but crooked = even harder still as it will bind. And it will look like heck.
                        When you roll the dowel + rod on a table top you can readily tell how perfectly centered and straight it is.
                        Last bit of advice: Drill a hole in a scrap 2x4 the same size as your dowel then split it with your table saw through the middle of the hole. Use this for clamping the dowel w/o damaging it both while drilling the center hole and when driving the rod in with the ratchet. This will increase the holding contact and not put vise pressure on just two sides of the dowel but rather most of the circumference. It will prevent marring and denting the handle!!! DAMHIKT!! And it will probably keep the dowel upright as you work on it.
                        These are very good instructions. Thank you Sir !!

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                        • #29
                          Reporting Success - Thank you so much LCHIEN , capncarl , dbhost for everything.

                          (Progress in the photos attached).

                          Dr. Loring - followed the 2x4 hole trick as you can see in the photos. I had a 1-1/8" hole saw to cut the hole which turns out to be 35 mm. The dowel turned out to be 34 mm. Even splitting the 2x4 block in half didn't clamp it tight enough after squeezing. So I used a 100 grit sandpaper rolled around and that did the trick.

                          It is so satisfying to fix a broken machine.

                          More importantly, I learnt a lot out of this project. Especially the technique to drill on a drill press, then disengaging the belts and using the chuck to drive the shaft straight. That's so slick !

                          I cannot thank you enough for all the guidance, ideas and encouragements.

                          - Nicer
                          Attached Files

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                          • #30
                            I use a bit same dia. As the dowel.Split in half with table saw. The kerf cuts away enuf material so it clamps tightly. But still makes contact 95% of the circumfrence.

                            but I think it came out great. Like you said always a pleasure restoring a tool to working.

                            and great pics documenting it. I keep computer folders on all the stuff I make.
                            Last edited by LCHIEN; 05-15-2022, 12:12 PM.
                            Loring in Katy, TX USA
                            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                            Comment

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