CNC arrived

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  • CNC arrived

    Took about 3 months but my CNC finally arrived. Base was delayed but I can set it up without it for now. Will build a simple table for it to get started.
    Attached Files
    I reject your reality and substitute my own.

  • #2
    looking forward to what you can make
    Laser CNC cutter or Router CNC or both?
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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    • #3
      It’s just the router for now but has an option of putting on a laser head. Which I plan to do in the future but probably not anytime soon.

      I knew the dimensions before buying but realization dawned yesterday as I was making space for it.
      I reject your reality and substitute my own.

      Comment


      • #4
        How large a workpiece can handle?

        Whats the area required for the machine?
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment


        • #5
          One of the guys at my church has a nice CNC rig. Love what he can do with the thing. Terrified of how much space it takes up in his shop. However he's in one of the newer homes in our area, with a 2 car garage sized for Suburbans, not Toyota Corollas.... And it's a 2 story so he doesn't share space with his wife in there...

          I'd love to be able to use one. Not sure I would want to try to squeeze one in my current small shop...
          Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
            How large a workpiece can handle?

            Whats the area required for the machine?
            Cutting area is 48 x 32. Floor space is a whopping 70 x 48. I've seen a couple of designs that attach the table to the wall and allow it to pivot up. The company that makes my cnc also has a similar version they sell. I'd rather not do that and for now I'll just put it on casters and see how well I can still move around in the shop.
            I reject your reality and substitute my own.

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            • #7
              Ooh, nice. Looking forward to seeing what you will do with it

              Is it open on opposite ends so you can push a long board through?

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              • #8
                One of the woodworking magazines had an article showing a CNC support cart that doubled as the table saw outfeed table. Basically the CNC was put on a shelf below the table top; the top was mounted on hinges if I remember correctly. It was within the last year or two I think... That table top could serve as an assembly table or some other table if you don't need another outfeed table.

                mpc

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                • capncarl
                  capncarl commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That would be a great idea, sharing the outfeed table/assembly table with the CNN! Except we all know that every time it’s needed for the other purpose the table would be full of clutter that would have to be piled somewhere else. I thought about making a cable “elevator” that would lift a CNC off my outfeed/assembly table and pull it up to the ceiling or partially into the attic, They do take up a lot of shop space.
                  Last edited by capncarl; 01-09-2022, 12:36 AM.

              • #9
                Here it is finally installed. It's from Onefinity. Journeyman model with their QCW frame. 48 x 32 cutting capacity. I bought an aftermarket screen and dust collection. Both of which I'm very happy with especially the DC. I flattened the spoilboard which makes ALOT of dust if there's no DC (damhik) and it got 95% of the dust. So far all I've done is flatten the spoilboard put in a grid and added some numbers. As you can see I had to re do the numbers because I screwed up with alignment. Plus when I did the dog holes I forgot to put diameter instead of radius for the hole size and the first 2 holes came out twice as big. Oh well it is a SPOIL board. Otherwise dead on accurate as you can see from the woodpecker square. It's what you expect from a cnc but it still surprised me.
                Attached Files
                I reject your reality and substitute my own.

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                • #10
                  Haven't gotten as much time on the cnc as I would like but here is my first 3D carving. The design isn't mine. No where near that talented. Took a mere 28 hours. Not including the first screwed up attempt which took 14 hours.
                  Attached Files
                  I reject your reality and substitute my own.

                  Comment


                  • atgcpaul
                    atgcpaul commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Is that finish straight off the machine or did you do some sanding?

                    What's the scale of that piece? The detail of the rosary beads is incredible.

                • #11
                  There was some sanding but not as much as I anticipated. Most of it was actually sanding the flat spots outside the carving. Honestly I was surprised at how smooth it came off the machine. But then again I was doing a 4% passover using a 1/16" tapered ball nose bit. When I paused the machine for the night (didn't think my neighbors would appreciate a router running all night) and start again the next morning the depth would drop between 1/64 to 1/32 so it developed a small ledge which I had to sand and blend the 2 surfaces together. You can still see a bit of it because I didn't realize I didn't sand enough till I put on the finish.

                  It's around 18" wide by 80" tall and just under 2" thick
                  I reject your reality and substitute my own.

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                  • #12
                    It's very impressive. Above you said the cutting size was 48x32. How did you get to 80" for this piece? BTW, I can't find the difference in height you mentioned.

                    I learned this weekend that there are composite Brad nails you can use to hold down workpieces to the spoil board and they can be routed through. It's unrelated to your post, but thought it was a cool idea.

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                    • #13
                      Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
                      It's very impressive. Above you said the cutting size was 48x32. How did you get to 80" for this piece? BTW, I can't find the difference in height you mentioned.

                      I learned this weekend that there are composite Brad nails you can use to hold down workpieces to the spoil board and they can be routed through. It's unrelated to your post, but thought it was a cool idea.
                      sorry I mis typed. The piece is 30” tall. Wow I didn’t know about composite nails. That’s interesting and I’ll have to look into it. I wonder if they’re stable enough to go through hardwood though. Honestly clamping (for me anyways) is kind of a pain. Since many times anywhere you place the clamps will interfere with the path of the router. In which case I usually go with the blue tape method.

                      I reject your reality and substitute my own.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        I just looked up 18 ga. composite brads.
                        Anco specifies a $250 brad nailer must be used with their nails.
                        Senco speficies a $221 brad nailer must be used with their nails.
                        Senco says the nailer is exclusively for composite brads so you can't fire steel brads.

                        Not clear on interchangeability between brands, but it definitely sounds like you need a special and costly nailer that can't be used for anything else.
                        And they are not cheap... 1" 18 ga costs $20+ for 2000 brads.
                        Loring in Katy, TX USA
                        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                        Comment


                        • atgcpaul
                          atgcpaul commented
                          Editing a comment
                          This link talks a little about using the composite brads in a standard PC air nailer. The author indicates that lower PSI was needed to shoot the nails without having them break in hardwood and no adjustment was needed for softwood like pine.

                          https://www.instructables.com/Polyme...C-workholding/
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