New Winter Tool...

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  • New Winter Tool...

    Definitely not woodworking, but definitely a tool. I have a 21 year old Toro CCR1000 snowblower and I'm well past mixing gas/oil, the smell of that exhaust, and the noise. I just received Ryobi's new RY408100VNM 40 volt Whisper Series 21" cordless snowblower. It comes with two 7.5 ahr. batteries, a fast charger, and coupon for a free second fast charger. They call it whisper series for good reason. It registered 60 dB on high speed. The CCR hits over 90 dB so the sound muffs will get retired also. Now Mother Nature has to come through with some white stuff.
    Jim Frye
    The Nut in the Cellar.
    ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

  • #2
    Purchases like that makes Mother Nature avoid you altogether!

    When we were in Japan, we had snow in Tokyo 4 years in a row. Then I went and bought 3 sleds in the fall preparing for the next coming winter. No snow of any accumulation for the next 3 or 4 years!

    I almost bought a Ryobi small blower for my daughter in Springfield MO as she has some good snows for the first 3 or 4 years. Then they went the last 3 or 4 years without much snow. The city snow graders pushed snow into every driveway about 1ft to 18" high. My daughter had trouble getting out of the driveway over the hump unless she went and removed it with her shovel. She didn't need a major driveway show blower, just enough to remove that hump. Not sure the Ryobi 40V would do that, plus they are rather expensive for once or twice a year events.
    Last edited by leehljp; 11-20-2021, 05:14 PM.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • #3
      I've never given snowblowers much thought, but this past February has me wondering...
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      • #4
        Lee: Our township is almost OCD about street snow removal. You can rely on having to remove the plow hump regardless if you beat them to clearing your drive or not. The old Toro struggled mightily with the hump. I have adopted the practice of clearing my half of the street for the width of my property. This way, the plow pretty much runs out of snow by the time it gets to my driveway approach.
        Jim Frye
        The Nut in the Cellar.
        ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

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        • #5
          I hope mother nature comes through so you GET to use your new snowblower. Then she should knock if off so I don't HAVE to use mine.

          I bought one of the first 40v Ryobi snowblowers for my daughter when she was in college in Duluth. She kept it in her car because she was often plowed in by the city or the school. She used it until she found a boyfriend, now her husband, who cleared the snow for her. It worked well for both of them.

          Our city has a V shaped plow for the sidewalks and we live in a cul de sac so there is no chance of them running out of snow. They provide me with three humps every time it snows.
          Last edited by twistsol; 11-20-2021, 11:02 PM.
          Chr's
          __________
          An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
          A moral man does it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by twistsol View Post
            I hope mother nature comes through so you GET to use your new snowblower. Then she should knock if off so I don't HAVE to use mine. .
            ROFL! No snow in MN? Now that really would be climate change! I'm familiar with MN winter. I used to go to the IBM facility in Rochester nearly every winter for new product testing and education. They used to tell us to dress for survival, not success.
            Jim Frye
            The Nut in the Cellar.
            ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

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            • #7
              SNOW HUMP: Thanks for each of your explanations.We don't have such problems Down here, and except for my daughter in Springfield MO area, I had no experience nor knew what it was called or how it was handled. The first four years, my daughter had a light weight small car and it was always difficult getting over the hump. She finally got a midsize SUV and while she hasn't had to deal with the "hump" yet in that vehicle, it should handle the hump better.
              Hank Lee

              Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

              Comment


              • #8
                Jim:

                I would love to see an update on how this works for you. I have my driveway plowed but I need to clear a path to the LP tank and thought a battery snow blower might be the ticket.

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                • #9
                  I will post something when it snows here. I promised Ryobi an in depth review when I get to use it. Until then, here's a couple of teaser pics to tide you over.
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                  Jim Frye
                  The Nut in the Cellar.
                  ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Question about snow blowers: I know blowers are intended for "snow" but the "humps", as mentioned in an above post, probably contain some ice and compacted show. Do home snow blowers handled those?
                    Last edited by leehljp; 11-22-2021, 04:20 PM.
                    Hank Lee

                    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would say the machines with rubber augers struggle with ice. Hence the reason for ones with steel augurs which can cut/grind the frozen plow hump. After fighting the hump, I started clearing the street so the plow doesn't dump across the drive approach. Our township is rather generous with pretreatment of the streets, so it is mostly packed slush right after plowing.
                      Jim Frye
                      The Nut in the Cellar.
                      ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bigger snow blowers with more power handle the ice better. The 72" snowblower I had attached to my 48HP tractor when we lived in the country would throw anything smaller than a football 60 feet or so. Most snow blowers have shear pins in the axel for the auger. If it hits something that jams the auger, such as a wet newspaper now frozen like a brick, firewood, or a stepladder under the snow, the pin breaks to prevent damage to the auger. Incidentally, the stepladder sustains a fair amount of damage in the process.

                        Snowblowers are useless for the hump if it gets packed down and/or freezes solid. Then if you live in the country you need to remove it with your skid steer and bucket. If you live in the suburbs, you drive over it until spring.
                        Chr's
                        __________
                        An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
                        A moral man does it.

                        Comment


                        • LCHIEN
                          LCHIEN commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Stepladder sounds like the voice of personal experience.
                          So how many spare shear pins do you keep around? And they are small... do you know where they are?

                        • twistsol
                          twistsol commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I have zero on hand at the moment. On the old tractor there was a box of them under the seat. I'd buy two dozen at a time for about $40. If I managed to clear the entire 1/2 mile driveway without breaking at least one it was a cause for celebration. The driveway was lined on both sides with black walnut trees which lost branches in every storm which were then drifted over. Anything less than a couple inches in diameter was ground up and thrown with the snow. The bigger ones caused problems.

                          The ladder incident was a really bad day. It was still usable.

                      • #13
                        Sorry guys, I am still trying to wrap my head around this whole snowblower thing. Mind you, I haven't always lived in the south, growing up I endured the Blizzard of 77 ad a kid, with a Dad, and a shovel. Guess how my Dad managed to get the driveway and walkways cleared?

                        So... you wanna go sledding with your friends? (hands me the shovel), clear the driveway, sidewalk, walkway and stoop and you can go.

                        Okay at least there were 3 of us... But still.

                        Oh, and we also shoveled out the same for the elderly widower a few doors down with the Corvair... Again, parents voluntold us for this service...

                        Oddly enough, since there were 3 of us, we were the first to the sledding hill...

                        So yeah, I chuckle when I think of actual power snowblowers. We could have had MUCH more sledding time!
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                        • LCHIEN
                          LCHIEN commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I can't believe that your family had 3 snow shovels in Houston.

                        • dbhost

                          dbhost
                          commented
                          Editing a comment
                          LCHIEN Nope. I was not in Houston in '77. I came to Texas as an adult. I was in a suburb of Cleveland OH at the time. My Dads Vega disappeared in the snow.... However, snow has not been a part of my adult experience other than travels... Actually come to think of it, I have only experienced snow where I live 5 times since 1980. 3 times in Houston, and twice in Oregon. Living at sea level, or close does that... Oh, and the first time it snowed on my in Oregon, I was driving home drom work, I felt like I was piloting the millenium falcon...
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