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Craftsman 150 drill press

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  • Craftsman 150 drill press

    Been looking for a few months to purchase a new drill press to replace the HF bench model. Happened across this 1963 floor model this weekend and am extremely pleased with my purchase. Looks like a Buick yet smooth a silk and capable of 20+ speed variations when equipped with the third pulley (not pictured) assembly. Added a counterweight system to raise and lower the table easier. Original owner had all the manuals and accessories. All in fantastic shape was just a bit dusty. May need a chiropractor after tear down and reassembly though.

    Harumpf!
    GrumpyDad
    Attached Files
    Harumpf!
    GrumpyDad

  • #2
    What's the swing of that model? (Its the number used to describe drill press capacity... its double the distance from the column to the drill axis center.)
    I love using a good and solid drill press.
    A really good depth stop is critical to me.
    Now what you need is a good woodworking drill press.table and fence.
    You can make one or buy one.
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-02-2020, 06:30 PM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • GrumpyDad
      GrumpyDad commented
      Editing a comment
      Dimension from column to drill axis center is 7.75". Have to select a table design as you suggest.

      Also was reviewing your quill stop comments from earlier posts just now.
      Last edited by GrumpyDad; 09-02-2020, 11:50 PM.

  • #3
    Nice find and it looks like it's almost in mint condition.

    Last fall, I moved my Ridgid 1550 out of the basement shop along with a few other heavy tools (Craftsman RAS and 33-gal compressor). It was a bit of challenge without help, but with the drill press I was able to lift the head off the column, move it to a bench and then down to the 2-wheel dolly. Lifting the head back up was somewhat more challenging though, as I just didn't have the strength on my own (hey, I'm an illustrator, not a stevedore). So, I ended up bracing the column against a table at about a 50-degree angle, got the head on and then swung it up into the vertical position, everything from there was okay.

    It was funny because I had no problem at all the moving and assembly of it fifteen years ago, must be the difference between 60 and 75 years old

    I think you'll find your newly-acquired DP a great addition to your shop!

    CWS
    Think it Through Before You Do!

    Comment


    • GrumpyDad
      GrumpyDad commented
      Editing a comment
      I thoroughly agree with your comments about re assembly of the head. Cast iron thing about 3/8" thick. I was struggling to balance and fit.

  • #4
    They're very top heavy. Really strongly suggest a good base for it, not the one it comes with, to prevent accidents.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • GrumpyDad
      GrumpyDad commented
      Editing a comment
      I have the base about 1.5" off the floor in a trolley with locking wheels. Now working on the table and lighting.

  • #5
    Regarding the base, I bolted mine down to a 3/4 x 24"-square Dri-Cor panel that I have used through my basement shop. While it now rests in the backyard shed, I left the base as it was just for that stability. I took notice of the mobile base in your photograph; may I suggest you put some kind of "out-rigger" boards on that, extensions that go out to the sides. As it sits now, if that starts to tip on you, those wheels will only exacerbate the instability and once it starts to go, you'll not be able to hold it up.

    CWS
    Think it Through Before You Do!

    Comment


    • #6
      I threw together a base until I can make something pretty. I like the idea of the Dri-Cor as a base material being that it is in the basement (slightly damp depending on season) on a slab floor. The foot of the thing is 18" x 24.5" cast iron.
      Attached Files
      Harumpf!
      GrumpyDad

      Comment


      • cwsmith
        cwsmith commented
        Editing a comment
        Hey, that will work just fine as long as the bottom piece is screwed into those side-piece two-bys. Only concern would be if your basement is wet, how long will that ply keep it's integrity.

        I mentioned the Dri-Cor, which I used when my DP was in the basement. After posting this morning, I went out to the shed to take some pictures (following post) of my DP table and realized I had removed that from the base when I moved it out to the shed. Right now, it sits on it's cast iron base. I think I figured that it was never going to get moved again, and it's pretty stable on it's own. As you will see in the following pictures, I've got it situated between my RAS and a steel tool cabinets, so it's not going any place.

      • LCHIEN
        LCHIEN commented
        Editing a comment
        That's an improvement but you have to bolt the DP base to the wider base to do any good!!!! Otherwise no benefit, maybe worse if you try and roll it around!

    • #7
      Here are some pictures of my DP table, which I purchase from Rockler. Not saying that's a recommendation as it's fairly expensive now days. Back then I think I paid about $150 with the table, fence, and attachments. It works quite well for my use, and I made a couple of modifications, primarily because I wanted to slide it on and off the metal-working table that the Ridgid DP was fitted with. As you can see, I simple cut a couple of pieces of scrap, and glued and screwed them to the bottom of the Rockler table. I have a couple of threaded inserts in the left-side piece where a couple of knurled bolts enable me to secure the woodworking table to the metal-working one. So, it's just a quick on and off process.

      Also something to note is that the Rockler table has a rectangular cut-out for use with an MDF insert which provides a new backing to minimize tear-out when you drill. That works, but I found myself not liking to replace those all that often. I figured that I rarely drill large holes, so I bored a single 5/16 th hole and plugged it with a piece of dowel. That's easy to replace as I simply drill it out, and glue another dowel plug into position. Primary reason to show you that is that when making your table, you may want to make some similar provision to ensure that you always have a solid backing of your stock when you drill.

      You might also note that I use my DP table as a support for my RAS, the tables align perfectly and I can adjust the DP fence to align with the RAS fence.

      CWS
      Attached Files
      Think it Through Before You Do!

      Comment


      • GrumpyDad
        GrumpyDad commented
        Editing a comment
        Really like the dowel rod idea. Also the idea of being able to quickly change/remove table. I do not like to mix metal drilling with wood because of the oil and mess.

    • #8
      if you haven't seen this look starting at post 34 in this thread: https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...ll-press/page2
      Loring in Katy, TX USA
      If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
      BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

      Comment


      • #9
        Hey GrumpyDad,

        Here is the quill stop I used for the Drill press mods I made, this clip is a split threaded clip - squeeze the black ends and it opens up spring loaded and will close securely around a 1/2"-20 tpi standard threaded rod. This is the master key to my drill stop. I have two, because it is also useful for setting the quill at a lower starting point when you need that.

        Aluminum Quick Quill Stop for Bridgeport Milling Machine Part

        https://www.ebay.com/itm/Aluminum-Qu...UAAOSwoIFdVmF0

        Click image for larger version  Name:	bridgeport quill stop 1.JPG Views:	0 Size:	20.1 KB ID:	840599Click image for larger version  Name:	bridgeport quill stop 2.JPG Views:	0 Size:	22.5 KB ID:	840600
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment


        • #10
          That looks to have been well taken care of. Almost 60 years old and looks like a brand new machine. Great find!
          Don, aka Pappy,

          Wise men talk because they have something to say,
          Fools because they have to say something.
          Plato

          Comment


          • GrumpyDad
            GrumpyDad commented
            Editing a comment
            Was just barely dusty. Even the table had no scarring or signs of having been touched with a bit. Original motor and all manuals. the worst thing I found was a large amount of spider debris on the under side of the base. Had to run some steel wool on the support beam/table and put a bit of protective oil on the freshly "sanded" areas.
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