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things I forget to do in the shop, revisited.

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  • things I forget to do in the shop, revisited.

    Just revisiting some old threads about things to do when working and then done working for the day.

    1. Turn on the air cleaner (off is not a problem as it has a timer)
    2. Put on the ear muffs
    3. Pull the plug when working on/setting tools MS, Router, BS, DP
    4. Change to a ZCTP when making TS vertical cuts and the vice versa: forgetting to change to the stock throat plate when making bevel cuts.
    5. Lock the DP table after changing the elevation. It doesn't rotate usually using a bit once you've started the bit it won't swing on you but the deal is that when the lock is loose the table sags a bit and the spot where the drill bit center hits the wood moves a few thousandths and the hole is no longer perpendicular.
    6. Set bandsaw upper guide height just above workpiece
    7. Start the vac or DC for the tool I'm using
    8. Change the RPM speed of the DP to the appropriate speed
    9. Put side shields on the safety glasses I wear
    10. Shut down the air compressor when I leave for the evening
    11. Turn off the laser on the Miter saw
    12. Release bandsaw tension after use (some people say this isn't necessary). I don't have a quick release.
    13. Close and cap the glue
    14 turn off the lights and lock the door

    A couple of other threads:
    https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...-for-the-night
    https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...p-when-working
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 01-07-2019, 02:45 AM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

  • #2
    About 10 PM last night, LOML and I heard a noise coming from the shop. Suddenly I remembered I had left the air compressor on, AND I had left the line switch to "open". Air had seaped down and it cut on. . . . The air compressor is air tight TO the line switch, but from there, there are small leaks, particularly at the end interchangeable fittings and somewhere in the recoil air line. So it leaked down over 8 hours enough to come on. I often leave lights on without thinking, particularly if I leave out of the shop during daylight.

    When I am working on most of my tools, I don't know why, but I started, a couple of years ago, to almost always unplugging before working on them. Cordless tools - I remove the battery before working on them - except when changing bits on the cordless drill - or corded drill.

    I sure dislike having to change the speed on the DP and usually leave it on the 700 range, but I learned last week just how much better it drills in metal at slower rpm. I got some Tap Magic and it sure does help.

    Off topic, but tool related: get the best you can afford, or at least quality tools:
    And, in working on my router table yesterday, I needed to drill some recessed forstner holes for the router top face plate levelers; I pulled out my Freud forstner bits and they were so much better than the cheap TiN forester bit.
    Last edited by leehljp; 01-03-2019, 11:40 AM.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

    Comment


    • LCHIEN
      LCHIEN commented
      Editing a comment
      8 hours is NOT a big leak.

  • #3
    I have compressors in both the shop and the garage and have done that before. The garage is directly beneath the master bedroom and when it kicked on at about 2:00 am one time, my wife and I bolted upright in bed. I don't forget that one anymore.
    Chr's
    __________
    An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
    A moral man does it.

    Comment


    • #4
      I leave my compressor on at all times. It has an auto drain, and I use air pretty regularly, so I don't want it empty. Leaving the line open though, causes us to wonder, "What the heck is that??" Just loud enough to notice, quiet enough to be confusing.

      Comment


      • #5
        My larger air compressor is a Craftsman 33-gal oil-less. It has never held air well and I keep it unplugged except on those rare occasions when I need it. It is so loud in use that my neighbors would be calling me if it ever came on in the evening!

        I keep all of my tools unplugged, out of habit. In addition, I double-check both the saw and drill press to ensure that the rotation is free and clear before I plug them in. Nobody goes into my shop except for me, but I'm always puttering with something and I never know if I've forgotten and left something where it shouldn't be. When I was in high school, I took metal shop and one day I turned on the big machinist lathe, only to fling the chuck key across the shop. In the previous class, some clown had stuck the key in the chuck, on the back side and I didn't notice it. It's a wonder that someone didn't get hurt (like me). I always checked everything closely after that.

        There are lots of little dangers in a shop, and also lots of little inconveniences. One thing I have never been able to do with any great success is be totally organized. I've probably spent more time looking for something that I know I have, just had, or used just yesterday... why I can't find it now is quite frustrating. One would think that I would learn a lesson. My excuse of course is: "A creative mind is a messy mind!" Sounds good, but then I know that I'm NOT THAT creative!

        Loring's list pretty much covers everything that I usually try to do. Overall, I think I'm pretty attentive, but wait, did I leave the lights on again... better go check!

        CWS
        Think it Through Before You Do!

        Comment


        • #6
          I lucked out on a ridiculous deal during the manufacturing downturn. Someone put a brand new on the pallet Eagle 5HP 60 gallon up for sale for $325. I must have broken every traffic law getting there. I can stand next to it running and still hear my neighbor's oil-free 6 gallon almost 100 yards away.

          I know I will never remember to do a bunch of things AFTER needing the machine. My routine is to check the machine before I use it. The shop closes down as-is, and I clean before I work. I guess part of that is that the shop often becomes the whisky and cigar hangout after getting work done.

          Comment


          • #7
            Ah, the 14 signs of ageing! I often do one or more all the time. Two nights ago, I awoke in the middle of the night convinced I had neglected to loosen the tension on the band saw and then worried that I wouldn't remember to check it in the morning.
            Last edited by Jim Frye; 01-03-2019, 07:33 PM.
            Jim Frye
            The Nut in the Cellar.

            Comment


            • #8
              I'd regularly forget about the compressor and in the winter, my ceiling mounted shop heater.

              I used my track saw about 8 months ago but that's the last "woodworking" I've done. I use my cordless drill so little it hasn't needed charging in months.

              We found out our next post will be in Central America after several months back in DC for language training. We will miss this place, but I'm looking forward to having "regular" power again and the possibility of a garage and a yard to maybe make stuff again and the idea of actually forgetting about something in the shop is now appealing again.

              Comment


              • #9
                I've got the lights and fans all connected to wifi controllers now, so when I'm done, I tell my watch "Hey siri, close garages" and everything turns off and the doors close. Otherwise guaranteed to be lights on and fans blowing all night.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
                  several months back in DC for language training.
                  that's some quick learning !
                  Ken in Cincinnati

                  Pretend this line says something extremely witty

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I was sitting in my shop with my radio/ear muffs, safety glasses and dust mask on facing my disk sander, totally focused on what I was doing when my wife got home. What does that have to do with things I forgot to do in my shop?????? When she pressed the button on the garage door opener so she could drive her car in the house garage she pressed the wrong button and opened my shop roll up door. The problem was I had accidentally pushed my metal assembly cart against the shop door. When the door lifted it picked the cart a couple of feet and dumped everything on the cart on my back, giving me quite a scare. I never heard it coming, probably 25 lbs of the unusual clutter that usually resides on the cart raining down on me. Now I make sure I turn the breaker off to my shop garage door opener.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by capncarl View Post
                      I was sitting in my shop with my radio/ear muffs, safety glasses and dust mask on facing my disk sander, totally focused on what I was doing when my wife got home. What does that have to do with things I forgot to do in my shop?????? When she pressed the button on the garage door opener so she could drive her car in the house garage she pressed the wrong button and opened my shop roll up door. The problem was I had accidentally pushed my metal assembly cart against the shop door. When the door lifted it picked the cart a couple of feet and dumped everything on the cart on my back, giving me quite a scare. I never heard it coming, probably 25 lbs of the unusual clutter that usually resides on the cart raining down on me. Now I make sure I turn the breaker off to my shop garage door opener.
                      Yikes! And you know even though the wrong button was pressed, you can't raise hail either.

                      I had all manner of stuff leaning up against my garage doors (we never used the garage for the cars). I had one incident like that and the openers stayed unplugged for 10+ years. When we sold the house, I was so happy the openers and the remotes were still working.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by capncarl View Post
                        I was sitting in my shop with my radio/ear muffs, safety glasses and dust mask on facing my disk sander, totally focused on what I was doing when my wife got home. What does that have to do with things I forgot to do in my shop?????? When she pressed the button on the garage door opener so she could drive her car in the house garage she pressed the wrong button and opened my shop roll up door. The problem was I had accidentally pushed my metal assembly cart against the shop door. When the door lifted it picked the cart a couple of feet and dumped everything on the cart on my back, giving me quite a scare. I never heard it coming, probably 25 lbs of the unusual clutter that usually resides on the cart raining down on me. Now I make sure I turn the breaker off to my shop garage door opener.
                        it is both funny and sad at the same time

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