Finishing shop cabinets

Collapse
X
 
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • gjat
    Senior Member
    • Nov 2005
    • 685
    • Valrico (Tampa), Florida.
    • BT3100

    Finishing shop cabinets

    I haven’t posted in years but still visit regularly as all of you all are a wealth of information and experience…
    Im finally able to rework my 9x20 shop and want to replace my scrap lumber cabinets with the cheap HD wood cabinets.

    My question is what is the easiest quick finish for the wood cabinets so they don’t look like trash in six months from dirty hands? I’d prefer a wood finish instead of paint and don’t see the need for spending two months sanding for a fine finish. What successes have you had?
  • Slik Geek
    Senior Member
    • Dec 2006
    • 672
    • Lake County, Illinois
    • Ryobi BT-3000

    #2
    For shop purposes, I often use shellac. The easiest way is to use Zinsser Bulls Eye Shellac - since you might be doing a number of cabinets, it may be better to mix your own. It is easy to apply, has less obnoxious fumes, stinks very briefly, and allows quick finishing (doesn't require days). Just be sure to understand the date code on the can to make sure what you are getting is not old. I have found that my coverage is much less than claimed on the can, so don't skimp on the quantity. See Stumpy Nubs Youtube video on using shellac. His application technique (cotton cloth wrapping cotton balls) is good advice. Shellac isn't as durable as polyurethane, but is much quicker to apply.

    Comment

    • twistsol
      Veteran Member
      • Dec 2002
      • 2901
      • Cottage Grove, MN, USA.
      • Ridgid R4512, 2x ShopSmith Mark V 520, 1951 Shopsmith 10ER

      #3
      I have to concur with Slik Geek on the shellac. It is very easy to apply and with the exception of lacquer, the easiest to make repairs to if you do damage the finish in the future. Polyurethane is much tougher, but if you damage it, you are pretty much sanding it all off and starting over.
      Chr's
      __________
      An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
      A moral man does it.

      Comment

      • gjat
        Senior Member
        • Nov 2005
        • 685
        • Valrico (Tampa), Florida.
        • BT3100

        #4
        Thanks for the advice. I feel comfortable to go with the shellac. I’m not looking to make my shop cabinets into fine furniture, just better than the scrap wood storage I’ve lived with for 20 years. Two coats should be enough to limit greasy finger stains without making this stage into a months long project.
        I’m re-doing my shop now that I have the money and plan to retire in a few years. After the base cabinets, I’ll modify the electrical, paint or stain the concrete floor, possibly do something with the dust collection, build or buy an actual woodworking bench, and hopefully enjoy woodworking and tinkering instead of always making do in a makeshift shop.

        Comment

        • capncarl
          Veteran Member
          • Jan 2007
          • 3569
          • Leesburg Georgia USA
          • SawStop CTS

          #5
          For shop cabinets i prefer the look of painted cabinets. It brightens up the shop. As far as dirty finger prints, paint cleans up well, and if it is a messy spot that won’t clean you can always smear on another cover up coat on that spot.

          Comment

          Working...