Swapping machines on same receptacle?

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  • atgcpaul
    Veteran Member
    • Aug 2003
    • 4055
    • Maryland
    • Grizzly 1023SLX

    Swapping machines on same receptacle?

    I have 3 tools that need 220 (or 230 or 240, whatever)--bandsaw, tablesaw, and jointer/planer--requiring 15A, 20A, and 30A circuits, respectively. In my old shop the BS and TS were on the same 20A circuit with 12-gauge wire using 2 different plug types, and the J/P was added later and put on a separate circuit with 10-gauge wire. I didn't have to share that shop with cars so the tools just stayed where they were near their receptacles. I'll have to share my new shop with 1 car.

    I was going to operate the BS and J/P in that swing space as they're easier to roll. Do you see an issue putting the same 30A twistlock plug on both the BS and J/P so they can share the same 30A receptacle?
  • leehljp
    Just me
    • Dec 2002
    • 8479
    • Tunica, MS
    • BT3000/3100

    #2
    No, as long as only one runs at a time. It may not meet some codes, but you probably don't have them where you are. You will not be overloading the circuit breaker if running only one at a time. Just My opinion.
    Last edited by leehljp; 06-05-2022, 01:24 PM.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • mpc
      Senior Member
      • Feb 2005
      • 987
      • Cypress, CA, USA.
      • BT3000 orig 13amp model

      #3
      Are you suggesting "merging" power cords from two or more tools into one physical male plug end? So both tools would be plugged in at the same time? From an electrical point of view, that is no different than having multiple items plugged into a power strip or into an extension cord with a 3-outlet end. It is an unusual method; I would instead put twist-lock male ends on each tool's power cord and just plug one tool in at a time. I leave my tools unplugged until I actually use that tool; for the bandsaw I store the cord around the tension quick-release handle as a reminder to re-tension the blade before using the bandsaw. Plugging the tool in also reminds me to open the appropriate dust collector blast gate as my outlets are located part-way up the walls, just below the ducting and just below wall mounted cabinets.

      Or are you suggesting putting individual twist-lock male ends on the power cords for each tool? And thus only one tool at a time would be plugged into the outlet? The bandsaw would thus have a male plug end rated for 30 amps even though it draws only 15 amps. Big deal; all power cord ends must be rated for at least as many amps as a tool requires but being beefier/stronger is goodness. The fuse or circuit breaker on the tool itself should be sized/rated to match the tool's power requirements; that fuse/breaker should be rated no higher than the smallest wire conductor carrying the 240 volts as the smallest wire is the "weakest link" in the circuit.

      mpc

      Comment

      • atgcpaul
        Veteran Member
        • Aug 2003
        • 4055
        • Maryland
        • Grizzly 1023SLX

        #4
        Originally posted by mpc
        Are you suggesting "merging" power cords from two or more tools into one physical male plug end?
        No, definitely not.


        Originally posted by mpc
        Or are you suggesting putting individual twist-lock male ends on the power cords for each tool? And thus only one tool at a time would be plugged into the outlet?
        Yep!

        Originally posted by mpc
        Big deal
        OK, good. After I posted I realized we do this every day--plugging in lower power requiring devices like an electric toothbrush charger into a 15A receptacle--and don't think twice.

        Comment

        • Jim Frye
          Veteran Member
          • Dec 2002
          • 1051
          • Maumee, OH, USA.
          • Ryobi BT3000 & BT3100

          #5
          Yes, my shop is wired with a 120 VAC, 20 amp. 12 ga. circuit for tools and since all are rated for 15 amps., all has been well. The table saw can draw up to and over (at stall) 20 amps. and has tripped the breaker on occasion with the ShopVac plugged and running also. My only reservation for your circuit is powering the 15 amp. bandsaw on a 30 amp. circuit. Not sure what problem that might pose for the bandsaw motor if by some reason it stalls and the breaker doesn't trip. I'm no electrician and I haven't stayed at a Holiday Inn Express lately, so take my concern with a salt lick block.
          Jim Frye
          The Nut in the Cellar.
          ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

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