Simple DIY shop made items for use in the shop. What have you made? Part II

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  • #31
    Hank, 9/32" is a size just a hair larger than across the corners of the 1/4" hex bit (which is 1/4" across the flats). A 1/4" hex bit will NOT fit in a 1/4" diameter hole.
    That (9/32") not a snug fit but there's no slop. If you turn it over and shake it they will all fall out. If you don't shake I daresay most will fall out.

    Here's the dope: The geometry-based math says the distance across the flats is .250/Cos(30) which is .28865"
    Manufacturing being what it is there is probably some small radius on the corners.

    I measured a few just a minute ago and they run about .280-.285" probably because they break the sharp edge for that radius I mentioned.

    I suggested an Number series "L" bit at .290 will work. And a 9/32 is .2815" Remember it only touches at two or six points, not 100% of the circumference (like a round shank), so its not hard to get out even if its a pretty close fit. So I find 9/32 is quite good.



    I see I posted this project twice. Oh well. Getting forgetful.
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-07-2021, 03:15 PM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
      Hank, 9/32" is a size just a hair larger than across the corners of the 1/4" hex bit (which is 1/4" across the flats). A 1/4" hex bit will NOT fit in a 1/4" diameter hole.
      That (9/32") not a snug fit but there's no slop. If you turn it over and shake it they will all fall out. If you don't shake I daresay most will fall out.

      Here's the dope: The geometry-based math says the distance across the flats is .250/Cos(30) which is .28865"
      I measured a few just a minute ago and they run about .280-.285" probably because they break the sharp edge.
      I suggested an Number series "L" bit at .290 will work. And a 9/32 is .2815" Remember it only touches at two or six points, not 100% of the circumference, so its not hard to get out even if its a pretty close fit. So I find 9/32 is quite good.

      I see I posted this project twice. Oh well. Getting forgetful.
      IF my chart is right:
      I see that a "K" letter bit is .281" which is a minuscule less than the 9/32 / .28125". I would like it a bit snug and will probably use soft pine instead of ungiving oak or maple.
      The letter J is .277"
      7mm is .2765"
      17/64" would be way to small at .265625"

      One reason that I am looking for snug is that I have had some holders in which bits are loose in the holes and they "jump" out at the least bump in a tool box for me.

      OH I just thought of something - I'll look up those foam rubber 1/4" router bit holders. That might work. Or drill the holes all the way through different thicknesses of wood and line the bottom with magnetic rubber strips to hold them in.

      Lots of ways to do that. I'll keep thinking about this. Thanks for getting me started!
      Hank Lee

      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

      Comment


      • #33
        Well, if you want it to fit that close then some experimentation is in order.. Good luck. I'm going to predict that they won't be that uniform in measurements across the points due to differing amounts of roundover radius used on the corners from bit to bit to maker to maker.


        Magnet idea sounds good. You can even fine tune the magnet strength with a thin layer of plastic on top of the magnet. the thicker the plastic the less holding strength.
        Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-15-2021, 02:47 AM.
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment


        • #34
          I like the router stand and the bit holder. I need 3 of the bit holders. One for screwdriver bits and to one each for 1/4" and 1/2" router bits.
          Don, aka Pappy,

          Wise men talk because they have something to say,
          Fools because they have to say something.
          Plato

          Comment


          • #35
            Pappy, I find for router bits I drill 1/64th over size to make a slip fit in wood. Like 17/64th for 1/4" shank bits and 33/64ths for 1/2" shanks. I had to buy a 33/64th bit but hey it was worth it; most all of the 64th increment bit sets stop at 1/2" exactly. Cost about $10 bucks but I've used it multiple times for slip fit to 1/2" items. Nothing like the right tool for the job.

            Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-07-2021, 03:11 PM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

            Comment


            • #36
              ROUTER BIT VISE

              I posted this before separately but its a handy shop jig that takes but a very short time to make. Its very handy for holding router bit securely while you sharpen them, clean them, or change bearings or do other services. Router bits are sharp and small little non-convenient things to hold securely and take a whole hand to do it. Easy to cut your hand while fumbling with them.

              My final version (instructions and plans downloadable PDFs) can be screwed to the bench, clamped, or held in a larger vise.

              I was inspired frankly by the $100 or so Woodpeckers bit vise and you have to buy separate ones for 1/2 and 1/4" shank bits.
              I didn't copy the little dish for holding parts... if you want one spend $3 at HF for their 4" magnetic parts holder dish. https://www.harborfreight.com/4-inch...c+parts+holder
              My design is
              Less than $1.00 in hardware costs with some scrap wood.
              Three ways to mount... screw holes, fence clamp hole, or F-clamp. The dowel bits on the bottom keep it from rotating when using a single clamp to hold it.


              Click image for larger version  Name:	fetch?id=785760.jpg Views:	0 Size:	74.6 KB ID:	845266

              Final version
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              detailed Plans and instructions:

              click on PDF files under attachments to download them.

              original thread https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...outer-bit-vise
              Attached Files
              Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-15-2021, 02:51 AM.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

              Comment


              • nicer20
                nicer20 commented
                Editing a comment
                @LCHIEN: The links to PDF files aren't working. FYI - when you get a chance to fix them. Thanks in advance.

                CORRECTION: Links in the article don't work but those under the photos are working. Leaving the original comment in place so someone else finding it later knows how to access them.
                Last edited by nicer20; 09-12-2021, 08:24 PM.

              • nicer20
                nicer20 commented
                Editing a comment
                BTW another cool application of that Rockler clamp. I have bought the set. Thanks LCHIEN.

            • #37
              TALL RIP FENCE USING FENCE CLAMPS

              I posted this as a BT3000 jig idea, but it works for any brand of saw needing a tall rip fence for cutting the ends of taller objects on the table saw. Can also be used for a tall router fence attachment.
              I did this recently because its so much easier than the t-nut method of attachment.

              More construction details for BT3x00 specific saw at https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...tall-rip-fence
              To make it even easier, just use a 1-3/4" Diameter hole or larger instead of the oval cut. with the bottom of the hole located at about the fence height level. Distance from the ends is not critical, a few inches, I used 5". Trickiest part is drilling a 3/8" hole from the bottom edge well centered to the plywood and intersecting the large hole.

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              Attached Files
              Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-16-2021, 10:48 AM.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

              Comment


              • #38
                Longer Crosscut Fence

                Here is a long crosscut fence I made - nothing as genius as Loring and others. But using similar ideas from you all. Especially used the Rockler clamps.

                Added sandpaper on the face to prevent the stock from sliding.

                One note - I thought using a taller than stock fence is better. It turned out I had to create notches on the back side for the Rockler clamps to sink in all the way and get flush with the main aluminum fence. Without those notches the fence was lifting at the bottom when I tightened the clamps.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • LCHIEN
                  LCHIEN commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Way to go!

              • #39
                Corner Clamping Set

                Also built these for helping me with assembly. Again not my design but saw it on Pinterest.

                The inside cuts are a little bit slanted as I used jigsaw and the blade probably bent. I am planning to use router with a straight bit and a guide to clean it up and make it straight. That way I think they will stay true when clamped to workpieces.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #40
                  I was looking through my photos and found something else I made back in May or June and forgot to post: Dovetail and Box Joint Jigs

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                  I used a MilesCraft template for that.
                  Hank Lee

                  Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                  Comment


                  • #41
                    Hex Drive Drill bit holder

                    just like the screwdriver bit holder a couple of posts back 9/32" (0.2815") was a snug fit. No drills would fall out when turned over, one drill would not go all the way down - its a hard wood.

                    I reamed them with an "L" bit (0.290") and they are now a slip fit. Theoretical point-to-point across a 1/4" hex is .288"

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                    Set cost $7.69 from HF.
                    Planned to use it with battery screwdriver to ream holes....
                    Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-13-2021, 02:46 AM.
                    Loring in Katy, TX USA
                    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
                    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

                    Comment


                    • LCHIEN
                      LCHIEN commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I use 95% of the time a set of 7 brad point bits 1/8" to 1/2" I keep ready access to the drill press. see post 11 in https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...-have-you-made

                      And I have two sets of brad point bits by 1/64thy in my tool box next to the drill press for closer tolerance holes.

                      I also have all kinds of sets... the 115 piece set for precision holes and sets with normal twist bits in 118 and 135 degree tips.
                      But brad point for most wood working.

                    • LCHIEN
                      LCHIEN commented
                      Editing a comment
                      These bits I got for convenience in hand drills where I change back and forth quickly between sizes. Don't have to open or close chucks much to change. Also was planning to use in electric screwdriver but that's another story.

                    • nicer20
                      nicer20 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Ok. Thanks for the insights. Added brad point bits to my ever growing shopping list :-)

                  • #42
                    Router Edge Guide

                    Made this simple one for my small handheld router. The small piece is cut to align with the center of the bit.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • LCHIEN
                      LCHIEN commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The only reason for the hinge is so it won't get lost? Just a strip of wood the right width can be set down and then removed will work next to any straight edge.

                      Have you seen these straight edge guide clamps that clamp to wide pieces and tables? https://aax-us-east.amazon-adsystem....3-935c7b59e870

                      https://www.amazon.com/Emerson-Tool-...4225066&sr=8-7

                      https://www.harborfreight.com/50-inc...ide-66581.html
                      Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-15-2021, 12:37 AM.

                    • nicer20
                      nicer20 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes I agree about the hinges keeping the piece along the edge instead of loosing it or having to search for it. Just makes it quick to grab and set.

                      I will take a look at those clamps you sent. Had a quick look.

                      Thanks

                    • LCHIEN
                      LCHIEN commented
                      Editing a comment
                      HF has a 24" for $14 and a 50 inch for $20

                      https://www.harborfreight.com/50-inc...ide-66581.html

                      Not used them but cheaper than Amazon or Rocker.

                      Clamped to the workpiece, They work great for router and or circular saw or jig saw straight cuts. Make good temporary router table and drill press table fences as well. Can even make a fence on your work table top. With no above the table protrusions to get in the way.
                      Some have guide base plates that slide on them that you attach saw or router for guided cuts that can't drift wide.
                      Last edited by LCHIEN; 10-15-2021, 12:48 AM.

                  • #43
                    Originally posted by leehljp View Post
                    I was looking through my photos and found something else I made back in May or June and forgot to post: Dovetail and Box Joint Jigs

                    Click image for larger version Name:	Dovetail and Boxjoint 2.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	132.9 KB ID:	845449
                    Click image for larger version Name:	Dovetail and Box Joint.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	132.3 KB ID:	845450

                    I used a MilesCraft template for that.
                    I looked up the Milescraft template you mentioned.

                    One thing I am not clear is why they sell a template to make a box joint jig that then can be used to make a box joint? Can they not make a template that can be used as a jig directly? What am I missing here?

                    Thanks in advance.

                    NG

                    Comment


                    • #44
                      Originally posted by nicer20 View Post
                      I looked up the Milescraft template you mentioned.

                      One thing I am not clear is why they sell a template to make a box joint jig that then can be used to make a box joint? Can they not make a template that can be used as a jig directly? What am I missing here?

                      Thanks in advance.

                      NG
                      Several reasons:
                      1. The half template is cheaper than a full template, and with the template, several half or full width box joint or dove tail jigs can be made - over and over.

                      2. I don't do much but on occasion I need a good box joint, and am VERY careful, that said, I have read numerous times from professionals, it is a matter of time before a single slip of the router and a box joint or dove tail finger is messed up by the bit.

                      3. Full width aluminum box joint and dove tail jigs are expensive compared to the Milescraft.

                      After making those in the picts above, Peachtree Woodworking offered their Aluminum system for $99 and I jumped on it.
                      https://www.ptreeusa.com/rtr_jigs_dovetail_wiz.html

                      The Milescraft template was only $39.95 (IIRC) while almost every other aluminum was at least $140+ and more when I bought the Milescraft. So when the Peachtree jig came out at $99 for a few days in mid July, I jumped on it immediately. Now I have two sets. . . . I just have to find some time to use them now.

                      BTW, here is the link to the extras that I got with the $99. I don't think it can be bought for $99 now.
                      https://www.ptreeusa.com/edirect_071721_dove.htm
                      Last edited by leehljp; 10-14-2021, 08:19 PM.
                      Hank Lee

                      Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

                      Comment


                      • #45
                        Everyone here is getting too serious with this stuff.
                        I like to make things that are useful and not too complicated and require little measurements and skills. No plans or drawings are needed, just a sketch on the back of your hand with a ball point pen is ok. Sometimes the fit doesn’t have to be great and if it doesn’t slide together a couple of raps with the hammer makes it fit great. The locking fixture must be easily fitted, simply hog out a hole until if finds the mating hole in the other side, then beat a bolt through the hole. No finish is needed, just squirt some cheap caulk on to help weatherproof it and cover up the splinters!

                        Click image for larger version

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