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Getting my shop back together...

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Cochese View Post
    That particular item linked isn't available anymore I don't believe.
    It's a stock item in this area, shows 55+ available at each of my local stores. I do see they are listed at "not sold at this store" for the League City, TX store.

    The box stores do use different primary brands in different parts of the country, so the brand they stock in your area could be different, with a different SKU and item number.
    Last edited by woodturner; 12-31-2013, 12:42 PM.
    --------------------------------------------------
    Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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    • #17
      Originally posted by dbhost View Post
      Those look like a great idea, however nobody local to me seems to sell them. Home Depot shows them as an in store only item, not carried within 50 miles of me so they won't allow me to web order them. I could get my local Ace Hardware to special order some I bet... I should try that.
      Maybe not that brand or specific model, but any store that handles much in the way of electrical supplies should have them for around $1.00. Basically, any store that sells electrical boxes should have them, and Ace likely stocks them. If you need a lot of them, might be better to go to the local electrical supply store, they typically will discount them a bit.

      Your profile show League City, TX for location, and the Ace there shows them available (though at a higher price) in one to seven days:
      http://www.acehardware.com/product/i...ductId=1294722

      That's also a decent picture of how they are used.
      --------------------------------------------------
      Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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      • #18
        I am pretty sure I have seen these at my Home Depot. Just under a different name...
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        • #19
          Originally posted by dbhost View Post
          I am pretty sure I have seen these at my Home Depot. Just under a different name...
          Dohh - I read you post differently than I think you meant. I thought you meant you didn't have a local HD.....

          I see that they show the item not available in your location, but there are similar ones available at the League City HD. They seem to cost more, not sure why, maybe higher shipping costs, more restrictive local code modifications, something like that.
          --------------------------------------------------
          Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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          • #20
            Well I figured I would give you a quick set of shots / perspectives from my sketchup to show you what I am trying to eventually get to...

            Brief descriptions are...

            The normal isometric view I post of the full shop, then the overhead view which would allow a decent view of the floor plan.

            The miter bench view isn't completely accurate. In function I adjusted the height of the side cabinet to allow the table of the mortiser to line up with the table of the miter saw. That view also shows the rolling clamp rack stashed by the dust collector more or less out of the way. The workbench shows the same basic shape as the current bench, but redone with a fully laminated butcher block type top, 1.5" thick, and lower spreaders all the way on the base, with a fully enclosed lower section. The drill press detail shows at least one idea for how to deal with storage of my drilling accessories, AND the floor model drill press. I got lazy on the caster modelling, so just kind of wing it okay? The table saw workstation detail is VERY rough at this point. I have some ideas, but nothing is exactly solidly designed yet. The base / router cabinet as drawn at this time is basically a placeholder... I really have no clue. Same goes for the lathe base. I have it shown with a basic box of drawers attached to the spreaders. I can do that, but I am not sure it is the best plan. Still ironing that out. The detail of the wall mounted cabs above the lathe however, is pretty spot out, Just going to take the 2 existing cabs, connect them with cleats / shelves, and enclose the middle space with plywood doors... Also visible in that view is the tool stacker moved to the wall between the cabs and the RO system.

            When all is said and done, and not shown here is the rolling lumber cart, I want to be able to roll the lumber cart, table saw station, and workbench aside, and pull a car in the left garage bay if need be...
            Attached Files
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            • #21
              Okay so better late than never. The wood storage area. The shelf standards / brackets will hold wood up far enough away so that I can pull a car in, get in / out no problem if need be. The sheet goods / cutoffs cart will be on wheels and will be able to be rolled out of the way as needed.

              I am not sure if I shared the Sketchup for that cart here...

              The color completed model is HERE.

              The model with the cut sheet diagram, exploded view and completed view is HERE. Sorry no color on that one...
              Attached Files
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              • #22
                The wall is sanded except for the upper seam. That is still plenty wet and needing to set up. I have been carefully transferring stud location lines to the ceiling, however I must admit I am being far from particular about how well blended the sanded wallboard mud is. I am glad I don't make my money doing this. My attitude about doing the sheet rock is simply bad... I hate this work and wish I could have paid someone else to put up with it...

                I fear that when all is said and done, it will take me a year to get the drywall dust out of the filters, and off of every bit of equipment that is in my shop. Yuck...
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                • #23
                  It's amazing how much faster the work goes when your attitude about how perfect the joints / sanding goes bad...

                  I am in a hurry to get this done, and the grand total effect is... The wall is a garage wall. So dips and sways are acceptable...

                  However, I should mention to anyone else considering using it. Avoid the Speedwall brand paint at Home Depot. Coverage from this stuff was awful...

                  Anyway. Long story short, paint is on the wall and drying. Not going to bother with a second coat so bleed through will just have to show. I am more interested in getting the tool cabinets installed, tool stacker moved, and major machines moved into place...





                  The way it is right now, I am down right bone weary from working on this mess, taking down, fixing, and stowing the Christmas decor. Lots of my light sets are starting to go sour on me... I am probably going to let this sit until mid week next week to allow me to rest and catch up with everything else (Yeah like that is possible!)...

                  To top it off, I swapped out the old 1990s bright brass and glass chandelier in the dining room for a nice antique bronze 9 bulb unit that was officially one of LOMLs Christmas gifts... I have some minor touch up I found to do in the dining room once the new lights were installed...

                  Next weekend is going to have to be shop work, because the weekend after is going to be at my Brother in law's shop pulling the transmission from the truck and swapping in a new oil seal and torque converter. Ick...
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                  • #24
                    The second coat goes faster and covers better no matter what brand of paint.
                    DP
                    www.wardprobst.com

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                    • #25
                      Well the first coat exposed some flaws in my mudding I just couldn't live with. So on went another coat of mud where it was thin...



                      And while I was there dealt with my measurements, and realized something painful. My studs and the RO system tank don't line up quite where I expected them to. The anticipated gap between the cabinets just won't be there. But that is okay, The "Bridge" between the cabinets was simply fluff space anyway, and likely to collect junk I don't need...

                      Anyway, so I got the french cleats for the cabinets installed...



                      The mud around the sub panel is kind of thick. It makes up space for some poorly aligned drywall segments due to inexperience and hurry... The good thing though, after this sets, gets sanded, and a couple of coats of paint, it should allow the sub panel cover to sit flush against the wall...

                      I will probably set the second coat on the front part of the wall over the next couple of days, so I can have the tool cabinets hung by the weekend...
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                      • #26
                        Remodeling I have been suprised by how badly sheet rock was installed several times. I asked a builder about it and he pointed out that the standard practice is to hire young inexperienced guys with strong backs to put the wall board up. They are paid by the square foot and just bang it in place. Then the skilled finisher shows up to tape and mud.

                        So I doubt you did anything worse than a typical "professional" would have done in drywall installation. Fortunately, it is possible to make bad drywall installation look OK with mud. But it is easier to mud if the gaps are reasonable and the drywall has nothing really bad to be covered up.

                        I was talking to a guy at work just yesterday about finishing drywall. I hope to get to that stage soon on an extra room in the attic. I think a big secret is to not expect much from the first coat of mud. If the screw heads are mostly hidden and the tape is buried, it is time to wait for it to dry. It won't look like much until after at least one more coat. At least mine never does. He wants to keep messing with the first coat which doesn't work well at all.

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                        • #27
                          Well, aside from the issue around the sub panel, which is a combination of sub panel not installed square / supported on both sides. I should have added a support stud to the other side just for the box! aside from that though, I didn't get my measurement from the ceiling and adjoining wall quite right, so I ended up having to patch the sheet.

                          Along the main seam is simply making up for the depression naturally in the edge of a drywall sheet. I got the taping knife out and went back over it with a light skim coat, that shouldn't be a problem at all once dried and painted...

                          What is absolutely frightening, is I do have a room that was re sheet rocked professionally after I bought the house. (The middle bedroom was trashed so I had it redone when I first bought it). Aside from the fact I am taking longer, and I am not putting any texture on my wall, I can honestly say I am doing a better, more careful, albeit MUCH slower job than the professionals. The pro came in, hung the rock, taped and did the first coat of mud in one day, then came back a few days later did the second skim coat and sprayed on the texture...

                          The decision to scoot the cabinets one stud closer together was one that I am going to have to live with. It was more of a priority for me to get the tool stacker to this side of the shop, without interfering with the outlets, than it was to have the bridge between the cabinets. However, This DOES give me a nice gap to run a dust collection drop between the cabinets, so no harm / no foul...

                          Depending on how things go tonight, I need to wrap Christmas lights back onto their spools, and move a grapevine buck and doe closer to some light so I can inspect for broken / burnt bulbs and repair, then break down and re-pack into their boxes. The buck needs some metal repair to its tail... The wind blew it over and broke the tab off this year... Oh well. Anyway, once that is done, I can get after the wall painting the front half with a second coat...
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                          • #28
                            And now that I look at the photos... I need to either skim coat that main seam by the panel a bit more. I can't really sand it down as I would be in the tape VERY soon here... Ugh.

                            I guess I am spending more quality time with the taping knife tonight...
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                            • #29
                              Especially for small jobs, I like to use the type of compound that comes dry. I don't like mixing it but I like the fact that it dries a LOT faster. I have some 20 minute that you can sand in an hour to 2 hours max. So if I need a couple more coats, it is not a couple more days. When I've used mud from buckets, it didn't even always dry in a day. The dry stuff also keeps years without getting mold in it.

                              Anyway, if I only need a little, I put a little water in the mud pan and just mix it there. Mixing is a hassle but the whole mudding experience is a hassle so it only adds a little more to the otherwise unpleasant task. Others report success using a paint mixer in a drill. I bet that is a lot faster but it also seems like it would give me a lot more to clean up. If I needed a full mud pan or more, I might go find the paint mixer. My recent mudding has been little patch jobs. For that, dry is the way to go IMHO.

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                              • #30
                                I am going to have to try the dry / mix it yourself variety on my next batch. This particular job is using up a mess of mud though, so I am not that worried about if this stuff will keep. I never knew the dry mix dried faster though...

                                That would come in handy. The seam by the ceiling took 3 days to dry enough to sand. Ugh... I was thinking about putting a box fan up in the shop and blowing at the wall to dry it up faster... Temps are dropping here again, fast... I didn't pay attention. I got off lucky and pipes didn't freeze, but I should have run the heater in the shop last night!
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